Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Curb Find of the Week - 15,000 W Generator

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    Originally posted by v860rich View Post
    That sol. is there to cut fuel to the jets when the ign. key is turned off.
    They want to cut the fuel off when the key is turned off just for the reason you mention, stop flooding as the engine coasts down.
    You've probably heard these small engines back fire when they are turned off?
    That sol. stops the back fire, also the o-ring you mention isolates the jets from the fuel in the bowl so the sol. can do its job.

    THANX RICH
    Precisely!

    Kind of an after-thought to the intrinsic cause of the phenomena, lean jetting and high idle speeds.

    Reminds me of the solenoid actuated dashpots used on early emission compliant carburetors whose solenoid would totally close the butterflies upon switching the ignition off so that the engine would not run-on when shutting down.
    None of this is a problem with FI since all fuel is shut off when the key is off.
    Small engine carb designers thought of this little enhancement about the same time in order to be EPA compliant and keep customers happy.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by v860rich View Post
      That sol. is there to cut fuel to the jets when the ign. key is turned off.
      They want to cut the fuel off when the key is turned off just for the reason you mention, stop flooding as the engine coasts down.
      You've probably heard these small engines back fire when they are turned off?
      That sol. stops the back fire, also the o-ring you mention isolates the jets from the fuel in the bowl so the sol. can do its job.

      THANX RICH
      Yeah very nice that's actually an improvement as many just cut the spark and not only semi-flood the engine but dilute the cylinder bores lubrication... it's a little more expensive to do things this way as cutting spark is dirt cheap, that's kinda why im so surprised to see this on such an entry level genset...

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by v860rich View Post
        That sol. is there to cut fuel to the jets when the ign. key is turned off.
        They want to cut the fuel off when the key is turned off just for the reason you mention, stop flooding as the engine coasts down.
        You've probably heard these small engines back fire when they are turned off?
        That sol. stops the back fire, also the o-ring you mention isolates the jets from the fuel in the bowl so the sol. can do its job.

        THANX RICH
        The "at rest" position of the solenoid is retracted - unless it is stuck. If your theory is correct, then shouldn't the "at rest" position be to close off fuel with the ignition is off and only open when power is applied?

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by SLK001 View Post
          The "at rest" position of the solenoid is retracted - unless it is stuck. If your theory is correct, then shouldn't the "at rest" position be to close off fuel with the ignition is off and only open when power is applied?
          That would make the most sense to me also --- unless it's a time delay that just uses power for a certain amount if time then disconnects - if it didn't then it would kill the battery in short order...

          Comment


          • #65
            But does it run??
            I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by Seastar View Post
              But does it run??
              Also does it produce power and how well regulated is the output?

              Comment


              • #67
                Just a "heads up " pay attention to the main jets when you pull and clean them,
                most of these engines use asymmetrical jetting. Get em backwards and they're
                not happy.
                Dave

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by SLK001 View Post
                  The "at rest" position of the solenoid is retracted - unless it is stuck. If your theory is correct, then shouldn't the "at rest" position be to close off fuel with the ignition is off and only open when power is applied?
                  I haven't seen every anti-afterfire fuel solenoid out there, but everyone that I did see was extended by a spring.

                  When the key is in the run position the windings of the solenoid retract the solenoid's pintle tip allowing fuel flow through the carb. You can check the operation of the solenoid by simply applying 12V power to the terminal, if it's functional it will retract when power is applied.

                  Briggs & Stratton had a problem with after-fire in the muffler upon shutdown due to unburned fuel entering the exhaust system when the ignition was shut off, as these engines have a relatively fast idle speed. The use of the fuel shut off solenoid solved the problem.

                  Like I said, haven't seen them all but depending on orientation of the tip in relation to normal fuel flow thru the carb, the spring should keep the fuel flow circuit closed and only allow fuel flow thru the carb and into the engine when it is energized.
                  Remember this does not impact the carb's float, needle and seat function, it only controls fuel flow internally.
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                    Yeah very nice that's actually an improvement as many just cut the spark and not only semi-flood the engine but dilute the cylinder bores lubrication... it's a little more expensive to do things this way as cutting spark is dirt cheap, that's kinda why im so surprised to see this on such an entry level genset...
                    I'm pretty sure that a $3000 15,000 watt gen set is NOT entry level. THIS is entry level:



                    BTW, my Predator brand genset ($700) also has an auto fuel cutoff. I kind of prefer turning the fuel off by hand and running till it starts to run rough to empty the carb, but it is nice to never forget it.

                    Dan
                    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Seastar View Post
                      But does it run??
                      Haven't got that far yet...

                      Today, I was going to change the oil (probably not enough hours on the filter to change). It only holds about 1.5 quarts of oil, so I put an appropriate container to catch the oil. Here's what came out:



                      I didn't have the second container ready for use, because, hey, it only holds 1.5 quarts. After the first GALLON, I thought that I was going to need a "bigger boat", so I plugged the outlet up and fetched another pot. I estimate about 7 quarts came out of the engine (probably mostly gasoline). It had the viscosity more like gasoline than oil. This explains why I got so much "blow back" thru the carb inlet when cranking. I'm glad that it didn't start up on me - it would probably have killed me in the resulting explosion!

                      Since I took out so much "non-oil", I figured that I should replace the filter. I'll pick on up tonight at wallyworld.

                      Saga continues...

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by SLK001 View Post
                        Haven't got that far yet...

                        Today, I was going to change the oil (probably not enough hours on the filter to change). It only holds about 1.5 quarts of oil, so I put an appropriate container to catch the oil. Here's what came out:



                        I didn't have the second container ready for use, because, hey, it only holds 1.5 quarts. After the first GALLON, I thought that I was going to need a "bigger boat", so I plugged the outlet up and fetched another pot. I estimate about 7 quarts came out of the engine (probably mostly gasoline). It had the viscosity more like gasoline than oil. This explains why I got so much "blow back" thru the carb inlet when cranking. I'm glad that it didn't start up on me - it would probably have killed me in the resulting explosion!

                        Since I took out so much "non-oil", I figured that I should replace the filter. I'll pick on up tonight at wallyworld.

                        Saga continues...
                        Wow!!! that's crazy,,, only thing that comes to mind right off is say a little prayer that your main seals are hanging tough - it's not just the fact that gas can turn them to jello, it's also the fact that you tried to start it with that much fluid in the crankcase,,, hydrostatic lock can work both ways,,, in fact that's the reason never to overfill any engine is you can blow the mains and then have to replace them,,,

                        the fact that your engine was not leaking this all out is a good sign but not a guarantee that they are ok, for one the flywheel can stop a main seal from popping out of it's bore --- only to wear itself through the casing once the engine does get running... keep yer fingers crossed...

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Willy View Post
                          I haven't seen every anti-afterfire fuel solenoid out there, but everyone that I did see was extended by a spring.

                          When the key is in the run position the windings of the solenoid retract the solenoid's pintle tip allowing fuel flow through the carb. You can check the operation of the solenoid by simply applying 12V power to the terminal, if it's functional it will retract when power is applied.

                          Briggs & Stratton had a problem with after-fire in the muffler upon shutdown due to unburned fuel entering the exhaust system when the ignition was shut off, as these engines have a relatively fast idle speed. The use of the fuel shut off solenoid solved the problem.

                          Like I said, haven't seen them all but depending on orientation of the tip in relation to normal fuel flow thru the carb, the spring should keep the fuel flow circuit closed and only allow fuel flow thru the carb and into the engine when it is energized.
                          Remember this does not impact the carb's float, needle and seat function, it only controls fuel flow internally.
                          What Willy said!
                          I have seen some of these where some one cut the plunger off the sol.

                          THANX RICH
                          People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by SLK001 View Post
                            Haven't got that far yet...

                            Today, I was going to change the oil (probably not enough hours on the filter to change). It only holds about 1.5 quarts of oil, so I put an appropriate container to catch the oil.
                            After the first GALLON
                            <snip>

                            Saga continues...
                            That much fuel in the crankcase usually means the float has sunk, or the Viton tip of the needle has rotted away (damn ethanol!). I would do a thorough rebuild using the boiling method- a lot of small engine carbs have check valves or other parts that don't react will with solvent cleaners. Blow out with no more than 15 psi of air- nothing makes you feel stupider than launching some unidentified-but-critical part into deep space with high pressure.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              15psi ? seriously?? that wouldn't clean a babies diaper... lol

                              sometimes the needle and seat can actually be in perfect condition --- but it's the nature of leaving the fuel on for years that can mess up the best of system as the carb is vented and is in slow evaporation mode, trouble being is it's VERY slow so there's no cleansing of the needle and seat - it's new fuel intake demand is more like a seepage and some of that is so slow it does not even make it too the carbs bowl, and that builds up barnacles inbetween the two components,

                              this repeats and over and over then all the sudden you don't have a seep - you got a weep - and the weep can't peep so it turns into a steep,,, now you got a gallon and a half in the crankcase after a few years,,, of course - yeah all other possibilities can happen too, toss the float in some gas and see how it does , depending on the style but it should be roughly 3/4 of it's mass sticking out of the fuel...

                              Look at both the needle and the seat with a magnifying glass and try to pick out defects be it viton tipped or not,,, once cleaned if they look good and have no wear you should be good to go... you can rebuild allot of carbs without even ordering a kit, well - might not call it a rebuild but a cleaning and prime directive accomplished which is to just get the POS running and back in dependable service.


                              iv rebuilt 1,000s of carbs with 150psi and never launched a part,,, oh - I know "my day is a coming" lol

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Willy View Post
                                It's important to remember that some folks can be pretty wasteful before labeling them as a thief. I scored a very nice Husqvarna riding mower a couple of years ago because the previous owner thought it was shot. Much like the genny, it had a gravity fed carb with a petcock to shut off the fuel. We all know how religious everyone is about turning them off when shutting down.

                                Same thing as the OP's experience but they did get it running a few times with by now a crankcase full of gas and oil. Needless to say it ran like crap and spewed out gas and oil from the breather, all over the machine and into the carb like a cat puking out a hairball in order to save itself from gagging.

                                An oil change and a good clean up and it ran like new. Previous owner wanted nothing to do with it cause it looked like a rotten sack of potatoes, so yeah I stole it off of him for twenty five bucks. We were both happy.

                                ...........
                                ..........

                                If it's got an engine on it and it doesn't run, expect it to be out on the curb, most folks simply turf it because it's over their heads and they just want to put it behind themselves and move forward.
                                Remember what I said earlier? Exactly the same reason I got that almost new Husqvarna riding mower for next to nothing.
                                Gravity fed systems usually have a petcock and I'll bet yours was left on, hoping the the fuel pump and float needle would stop the fuel flow. ALWAYS turn the petcock off when not in use. It's not if, but when, doing otherwise will cause exactly this problem. It looks like you have one just where the fuel line comes out of the tank, be sure to use it. Probably explains why you too scored this unit, most folks simply do not know why it's there.

                                Motorcycles have always used a petcock for this very reason. When folks started to forget those, M/C manufacturers started using vacuum operated petcocks to make it idiot proof.
                                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X