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  • Removing rust

    I have a metal box of Collets that was given to me. Probably50 of them for my Rivett tool room lathe. Some have a light coat of rust. What would you think would be the best way to remove the rust? Being stored in the metal box, probably was a bad idea. I sprayed them with light oil when I got them. I was thinking maybe 2000 wet and dry paper. Any thoughts? Stan

  • #2
    Degrease, then Evaporust.

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    • #3
      yep... no abrasive, unless you don't care about them. When you take them out of ER, wash in warm water then immediately spray with CC 3-36. The CRC will displace the water and leave an oil film. If you let them dry they will flash rust.

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      • #4
        I normally like the ER for more items.

        Collets not so much. It doesn't sound like you need that heavy rust removal.

        I have bought some collets that were just shady with red. No big deal. Give them a nice drink of whatever oil you like and drain off the oil and lightly tumble with walnut shell media.

        Thats what I do, dont hold me to it . JR
        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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        • #5
          I wouldn't wash them after Evaporust. If it's left on, it prevents further rusting quite well.

          Alternatively, in place of Evaporust, you can use diluted phosphoric acid solution (like Phosphoric Acid Cleaner from Home Depot or concrete cleaning/etching stuff) to achieve the same result. It will be less expensive, especially, if you dilute it with water.
          Last edited by MichaelP; 09-12-2019, 12:46 AM.

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          • #6
            I use vinegar - cheap and safe. Here are some rusty bolts and nuts I derusted that way. Not pretty, but they are functional. I've also had good results using various grades of ScotchBrite. Only very mildly abrasive.





            I used the same method to clean up a rusty micrometer:


            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

            Paul: www.peschoen.com
            P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
            and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

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            • #7
              Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
              I use vinegar - cheap and safe. Here are some rusty bolts and nuts I derusted that way. Not pretty, but they are functional. I've also had good results using various grades of ScotchBrite. Only very mildly abrasive........
              Agreed. For the cost involved and the results obtained, simple everyday white vinegar is at the top of my list too. Just a couple of weeks ago I used vinegar to derust a couple of wedges I found at a local scrap yard like the one pictured below. They were as badly rusted as anything I have ever seen and a couple of weeks submerged in vinegar removed all the rust and left behind a soft blackish coating that was easily wiped off. They came out as clean as if they were sand blasted.

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              • #8
                Boil them, turn the rust into bluing.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 1937 Chief View Post
                  I have a metal box of Collets that was given to me. Probably50 of them for my Rivett tool room lathe. Some have a light coat of rust. What would you think would be the best way to remove the rust? Being stored in the metal box, probably was a bad idea. I sprayed them with light oil when I got them. I was thinking maybe 2000 wet and dry paper. Any thoughts? Stan
                  Stuff like that with just a light coat of rust, I soak a kitchen scouring pad (plastic, not metal) in oil and rub them over with that. Theres a bit of patina left, but thats no harm.
                  'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                  • #10
                    Can you post pictures? Are they three or four jaw?

                    Evaporust tends to react badly with high carbon steels. It might also dull up any remaining smooth surface. I'd be careful with those collets and wouldn't jump too fast.

                    Dollar Tree sells stainless pot scrubbers that are surprisingly gentle. They are my go-to for mechanical removal of rust. They won't work so well for the threads, slots and bores. Avoid the copper ones, they're hard and scratch.

                    CRC 3-36 does work well for storage of tooling. It is very light, and when it evaporates it leaves a protective coating. A friend says it even even protects the anvil on his cheap garage vise. I've done similar tests with blocks of metal in the garage with good results. I bought my gallon from Zoro for about $30 (free shipping after $50). They also have an email signup promo where you get a 15% coupon for signing up.

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                    • #11
                      I can't believe the way that mic came out. Must be the surface rust did not pit the surface.]

                      I've seen things where surface rust forms so rapidly and looks pretty bad but causes no harm to the surface below. Must be the case with the mic.


                      JL.............

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                      • #12
                        The nice thing about chemically removing the rust is that it only removes the rust. The good metal is not touched. This can lead to some noticeable pitting but dimensionally if the pitting is not extensive it won't affect the operation and trueness of the collets. It just puts a little more pressure on the "plateaus" between the lower pitted areas. Looks bad but mechanically very usable. So the proper method for something like a collet. By no means use any sanding to remove the rust. And live with any stained areas rather than remove the "stains" which is actually light pitting. Removing the stains by sanding the metal with anything other than the finest of grits will remove enough metal that you risk the collets not being as true as they could be. And even then if the stain does not come away with only a light cleaning up with super fine grit paper I'd stop and live with it.

                        A while back I removed light rust from a swap meet find. The body and complete cutter set for a Stanley 55 plane. I opted for Evaporust because I knew it would not try to re-rust the parts like stronger acids will do. Also I liked that I only needed to dunk the parts overnight to get the job done rather than a few days like I'd seen with vinegar when used for anything but the very lightest of rust.

                        If you use vinegar to remove the rust I'd give it a wash in mixed up solution of baking soda to aid with neutralizing any acid left in any of the pitting. Then rinse well, flush with WD40 or some other water displacement product and then dip in a good quality lighter oil.

                        I've done some rust removal with vinegar myself and found that the items tried to flash rust again when simply rinsed and set on a towel to dry before oiling them. I used the same method with the cutters as they came out of the Evaporust what with being a bit paranoid... Rinsed well, lightly dried with a towel and laid in a tray then showered with some WD40 every four or so new "damp" cutters. After that they were wiped off and oiled with regular oil and put into a little container still wet with oil until I need a particular shape. They were still good when I needed a cutter a few months back for a wood working project.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
                          Stuff like that with just a light coat of rust, I soak a kitchen scouring pad (plastic, not metal) in oil and rub them over with that. Theres a bit of patina left, but thats no harm.
                          +1. I ended up with a box of white scotchbrite pads (finest I believe). I'll soak one in Kroil or PB Blaster and scrub a little, no good metal removed. If that doesn't cut it I'll go to regular scotchbrite, still doesn't seem to phase good metal. If there are high spots I hit with a stone or file.

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                          • #14
                            For jobs like that, I like to get the oldest, most worn-out kitchen scrubbie (scotchbrite) that I can find. So worn out that it maybe even has holes in it. Soak the part in very light machine oil while scrubbing. Continue till the oil runs clear. Cheap generic baby oil does an amazing job at this.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                              Cheap generic baby oil does an amazing job at this.
                              USP grade mineral oil (cheap at big box stores) is the same stuff, without the smell.

                              I especially prefer it when sharpening, for when I cut myself and it gets into the wound. Sharpening oils are typically low grade dark nasty mysterium.

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