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36 inch Ciincinnati SHAPER 1968,what werer they thinking?

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  • 36 inch Ciincinnati SHAPER 1968,what werer they thinking?

    The guy on youtube ,fireball tool shows a beautiful 1968 shaper. I was working in tool and die shops starting in the late 50s.NO ONE AND I MEAN NO ONE WAS USEING A SHAPER ANYMORE.They sat in the corner gathering dust. So why was Cincinatti machine company wasting resources and space making these monsters in 1968 and WHO was buying them.I allways wondered when was the last shaper made in the USA? Yes ,I made some nice highschool projects and some weird long skinny jobs on them in the shop.I also learned to square up blocks of steel and use shaper hold downs. So I do know what they can do. The guy in the video sumed it up best,saying "you can make almost anything on a shaper ,except money"Edwin Dirnbeck

  • #2
    They must have been supplying via contract some company or government agency. My night school shop has late model 28" hydraulic Cinci, power downfeed, etc. One student took "home" $700 in finished parts at the end of a 3 hour class, so they can still excel at some tasks. His employer was more than happy to pay him for the work.

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    • #3
      I was using one commercially at my job in the early '80's. Mind you, it was in this third world country they call "Canada". And while I operated the turret lathe I thought about how I might run it using the recently released 8080 microprocessor. They are still making new shapers in India, right now, this very minute. NO ONE AND I MEAN NO ONE IS USING MANUAL, NON-CNC, LATHES AND MILLING MACHINES ANYMORE"... (Except me?)

      Yeah, whatever...
      "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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      • #4
        Hi,

        I think the Chinese would be happy to sell you a new shaper also, well at least before the whole tariff thing anyway.

        I would run a planer when needed back into the late 2000's. Those are even more obsolete than a shaper. I would use it to square up 6 and 8 foot heads for plate shears. At least I could bolt a small milling head on to it sometimes and get some decent use out of the thing. I could run 3 or 4 different jobs while it ran unattended.
        If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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        • #5
          So at 16 in 1976 I was working in a shop, not a tool and die shop, but they specialized in custom fasteners of all types. We used shapers to make large(like 6" across flats) hex bolts and nuts. I worked there for a few college summers and visited years after, they were still using shapers to make hex fasteners.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
            I was using one commercially at my job in the early '80's. Mind you, it was in this third world country they call "Canada". And while I operated the turret lathe I thought about how I might run it using the recently released 8080 microprocessor. They are still making new shapers in India, right now, this very minute. NO ONE AND I MEAN NO ONE IS USING MANUAL, NON-CNC, LATHES AND MILLING MACHINES ANYMORE"... (Except me?)

            Yeah, whatever...
            You are absolutely incorrect.
            There is a machine shop near me that is still running manual lathes, manual mills, and so on.
            His big lathe in the back is still running flat belts, to boot. !!!!
            Sorry to bust your bubble.........

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            • #7
              The demise of manual lathes and mills has been predicted for 30 years at least,but every year it seems there is yet another company entering the market selling them.
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                The shaper is one of the few machines that can pay for itself with one job.
                Mike
                Central Ohio, USA

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                • #9
                  Hi Everyone,

                  I just did this last week. I needed to cut a chunk off of a 3 X 5/8 inch piece of titanium. As far as I'm concerned, the shaper was ideal for this. Used a cheap HSS cutoff blade and cut halfway. Flipped the part, and did it again. It made quick work of it and the HSS blade didn't even show any wear, much unlike the Sawzall blade I first tried.





                  The last time I used it was a few years ago when I was roughing slots for what was to become QCTP tool holders. I finished them with a dovetail cutter. This allowed me to save my expensive cutting tools for the finishing.

                  https://youtu.be/VRt7lrcHvio
                  Last edited by jhe.1973; 09-18-2019, 02:36 AM.
                  Best wishes to ya’ll.

                  Sincerely,

                  Jim

                  "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                  "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                  Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

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                  • #10
                    OK, I got a question, I am not a really good machinist and I have to ask.
                    In the picture job posted above, and, if a shaper is a old outdated machine with no purpose, then how would you make the same cut with a modern mill or lathe?

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                    • #11
                      You are absolutely incorrect.
                      I shoulda put /sarcasm tags around my remark. LOTS of manual machines in use as far as I know, and I don't think they're going away just yet either. (And I love my shaper too!)
                      "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                        I shoulda put /sarcasm tags around my remark. .....
                        I thought your facetiousness was pretty obvious.
                        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                        • #13
                          I have never used one, so what is the point? Is it just that a shaper would just be a lot slower than a milling machine? But then, can't a shaper be started and left to finish the job while the machinist is doing other things? Kind of like sawing a large size of stock with a horizontal band saw? That would be efficient use of the machinist's time.

                          Or is there a reason why that is not true?



                          Originally posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post
                          ...<snip>...

                          The guy in the video sumed it up best,saying "you can make almost anything on a shaper ,except money"Edwin Dirnbeck
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                            OK, I got a question, I am not a really good machinist and I have to ask.
                            In the picture job posted above, and, if a shaper is a old outdated machine with no purpose, then how would you make the same cut with a modern mill or lathe?
                            If I had a horizontal mill with the power to keep a sturdy saw cutting I could have used that. Of course that means using a more expensive cutting tool. Titanium glazes (surface hardens) quickly if you don't have a very sharp tool and keep it cutting w/o sliding on the surface. Stainless and some tool steels act similarly.
                            Best wishes to ya’ll.

                            Sincerely,

                            Jim

                            "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                            "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                            Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have a 24" shaper built in 1980. I bought it from the original owner that used it to cut keyways. He told me he didn't think it had 100 hours on it total. I believe him. I use it to clean up the surface of a big round 2" thick disk I keep on my work bench. I use it as an anvil, a welding table and various other jobs. When it gets dinged up I just put it on the shaper and sit in the lotus position and hum ummmmm. I really like to watch it and that justifies owning it. I also use it to put keyways in various things.
                              Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                              How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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