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  • Picked up a drill sharpener

    An old drill sharpener. It's an M1, but I believe the chucks are from an M2. Seems like a heavy duty drill doctor. I'm curious to see if it cuts any better than one.


  • #2
    Wow! That's a nice one. Even has the "Instruction Manual". We're waiting to see a sample of it/your work!

    Comment


    • #3
      back when I ran a tool room we had a m3 which you could split the points with. I kept all the drills sharp for the whole company. I have a darex 2600 in my own shop it does up to 1" bits.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sweet. I have had an M1 for 30 years and they are the best. Two chucks let me sharpen 1/16" up to 3/4", I screwed up and didn't get the bigger chuck. The chucks you have are a bit different to the standard M1 chucks, the guide cams are a different shape. Will they work OK????? let us know.

        P.S. they are definitely NOT a drill doctor. which can't hold a candle to them. Why Darex stopped making these is a mystery. They where replaced by the Drill Doctor which is nowhere as good.
        Last edited by loose nut; 09-20-2019, 11:01 AM.
        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

        Southwestern Ontario. Canada

        Comment


        • #5
          We had a similar machine at the shop I worked in for over 20 years. In it's lifetime I would bet it accurately sharpened thousands of drills. No one ever complained about the quality or dependability of the machine. I tried to buy it when the shop closed, but unfortunately it was stolen before I could get it.

          Because I needed a sharpener in a hurry I bought one of the original Drill Doctors, now known as the "classic" model. It worked OK for about 5 years, but in the long run began to wear because of it's plastic construction. Several years ago I replaced it with a Black Diamond model 65 similar to this one:
          https://www.ebay.com/itm/Black-Diamo...AAAMXQh5JRko4k

          The model 65 was originally sold to the military. It's similar to the model 75, but uses a 3 phase 1/3 hp motor. It's a far better machine than either of the Darex machines, but sells for nearly $8,000.00 new. I was able to get mine for less than 1/10th that price. A local shop had purchased it as part of a lot at an auction when a National Guard maintenance facility closed. He didn't really want it, but since it was part of the lot he won it went to his shop. It spent 5 years setting covered in the corner before he decided to sell it to me.

          I was a bit surprised that the machine was in like new condition when I got it. When I enquired as to how much use it had gotten the answer was NONE. Why the maintenance facility ever bought the machine is a mystery since the building never had 3 phase power. It came with a complete set of collets for 1/8" to 3/4" drills, 2 new grinding wheels, and a wheel dresser. Since I've had it it's sharpened in the neighborhood of 1,000 drills.

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          • #6
            I got a Darex E85/90 end mill sharpener at a good price at an auction years ago; seems to be a well made and precise. Unfortunately it did not have the air spindle with it, which I knew nothing about at the time I bought it. As a result it has just sat gathering dust and taking up space.
            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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            • #7
              Why Darex stopped making these is a mystery.
              The same reason why a lot of tool room gear has also gone away I suspect. Higher wages and specialty skills needed for those that run a tool room shop. And replaceable carbide inserts for tooling and even drills when looking at larger sizes. And the common drills up to around 5/8" getting lower in price. And the specialty machines needed to sharpen them rising in price. What did a Darex cost at the end of the production? And how long did it take to sharpen a $3 drill bit? And the cost of such drill bits when purchased in bulk? DO the math on this and I don't think it will take a whole lot of time for an accountant to realize that it's cheaper to pass out new tooling and inserts and sell the used parts as scrap compared to keeping a skilled and well equipped tool room shop running.
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

              Comment


              • #8
                I would appreciate some explanation of how it works. I see a cam but not clear what moves where. Doesn't look too hard to make if it is a good principle of operation.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                  The same reason why a lot of tool room gear has also gone away I suspect. Higher wages and specialty skills needed for those that run a tool room shop. And replaceable carbide inserts for tooling and even drills when looking at larger sizes. And the common drills up to around 5/8" getting lower in price. And the specialty machines needed to sharpen them rising in price. What did a Darex cost at the end of the production? And how long did it take to sharpen a $3 drill bit? And the cost of such drill bits when purchased in bulk? DO the math on this and I don't think it will take a whole lot of time for an accountant to realize that it's cheaper to pass out new tooling and inserts and sell the used parts as scrap compared to keeping a skilled and well equipped tool room shop running.

                  Add to that volume users that do sharpen drills usually send them to a vendor that does them considerably cheaper than it would cost to have them done in house. When we were backed up to the wall with work we would get new drills from the stock room a 10 pack at a time. The dull ones would go into a box. If time was available for the lowest paid person in the shop they would sharpen the bits in their spare time. If that person was busy they went to the vendor.

                  The only downside to the vendor was the turn around time. When drills were sharpened in the shop any finished ones would immediately go back to the store room. When done by a vendor, the entire order was completed before any were returned. Sometimes the order included a few hundred end mills as well as several hundred drills. They weren't returned as finished, but rather when all were finished. That could sometimes be a couple weeks or longer.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                    And how long did it take to sharpen a $3 drill bit? .
                    If your in the zone, with a smallish drill bit, about 45 seconds, less if your doing a bunch. A little more for larger bits that require more grinding on a larger surface.

                    Originally posted by Baz View Post
                    I would appreciate some explanation of how it works. I see a cam but not clear what moves where. Doesn't look too hard to make if it is a good principle of operation.
                    You set the drill position in the chuck on the device on the top of the machine, it orients the cutting edges in relation to the cams. Next you put it in the sharpening fixture and position it against the wheel, which can be moved side to side and in and out. Rotate the chuck with your hand and the cam, moving against a roller on mine this one is different, oscillates the chuck in two planes so you sharpen the cutting edge and generate the relief. Hard to explain but easy to use.

                    These type of machines have been around for a very long time.
                    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ….If your in the zone, with a smallish drill bit, about 45 seconds, less if your doing a bunch. A little more for larger bits that require more grinding on a larger surface.....
                      But it's not just about the time actually used to grind the bit. A commercial shop has to include all the other time needed and related to the full job from collecting the dull drills, getting set up, post sharpening handling to return them to the tool storage and any paper work related to the job. Add all that in and it drives up the time per drill by some amount.

                      I'd say that the reality of the situation in today's world is more as related by projectnut in the post before yours.

                      Now don't get me wrong. If I could find a Darex grinder like this for a couple or three hundred bucks my wallet would cause a sonic boom from whipping it out so fast. But that's me by myself running a home shop as a hobby. I don't have to justify things to a financial department...… Yeah, I'm single too so not even THAT "financial department...
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                        Sweet. I have had an M1 for 30 years and they are the best. Two chucks let me sharpen 1/16" up to 3/4", I screwed up and didn't get the bigger chuck. The chucks you have are a bit different to the standard M1 chucks, the guide cams are a different shape. Will they work OK????? let us know.

                        P.S. they are definitely NOT a drill doctor. which can't hold a candle to them. Why Darex stopped making these is a mystery. They where replaced by the Drill Doctor which is nowhere as good.
                        Pin lines up the same. I found an M1 picture on eBay with the original chuck, profile looks close, I'm going to give it a try, read the manual lather today, see if they work, and report back with the results. Crossing my fingers.



                        Last edited by junkaddict; 09-20-2019, 05:28 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I bought a Darex after a hand sharpened 47/64 drill cut oversize and scraped 6 clutch assemblies that were to be reamed and had many man hours in them already. Most of the time I would do the dull bit box in one session at about a minute per drill.

                          I got the Black Diamond sharpener in our shop at the junk yard for $189! Took about $300 to put it top condition.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                            But it's not just about the time actually used to grind the bit. A commercial shop has to include all the other time needed and related to the full job from collecting the dull drills, getting set up, post sharpening handling to return them to the tool storage and any paper work related to the job. Add all that in and it drives up the time per drill by some amount.
                            These machines where not built for a big commercial shop but for small operations and mostly home shops, so while everything you stated may be true in a big operation it doesn't matter to the intended market.
                            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                            Southwestern Ontario. Canada

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The whole M-series thing hinges on the chuck(s). If you don't pay strict attention to keeping them clean and oiled, they will freeze up on you. Since they are no longer supported by Darex, that puts you SOL.

                              When the chucks work, the Ms are great machines.

                              metalmagpie

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