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Rebuilding my Alcosa forge

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  • Rebuilding my Alcosa forge

    I bought this forge in the eighties, for next to nothing, it was ex school and the throat plate had rotted out.I got a new one made, and it all went into a damp shed for 20 odd years, now it's out, rebuilt and proud!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMiFMp8q2fs

  • #2
    Nice presentation. Thanks
    Illigitimi non Carborundum
    9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade. Now I boil oil

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    • #3
      Nice. Is that a state of the art blower speed control on the right at 2:42?
      "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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      • #4
        Thanks chaps! Yes, it was state of the art blower in the fifties and sixties, but you still see them at the side of most alcosa forges in blacksmiths and farriers shops. This one is from a school and has seen little use, up till now that is!

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        • #5
          After many years of using a bottom blast forge, I built a side blast out of pipe and have never been happier. The constant clinker problem with a bottom blast has disappeared with the side blast - it still forms but below the air pipe so I can forge for long periods of time without constantly cleaning the fire.

          Nice job on restoring your forge...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by HWooldridge View Post
            After many years of using a bottom blast forge, I built a side blast out of pipe and have never been happier. The constant clinker problem with a bottom blast has disappeared with the side blast - it still forms but below the air pipe so I can forge for long periods of time without constantly cleaning the fire.

            Nice job on restoring your forge...
            Thank you! I think that bottom blast is mainly a US thing, and side blast a British one. I have certainly never seen a bottom blast in the UK, and didn't know they existed till seeing them on forum pics! My cousins son is a knifemaker in leeds, and I made him a bottom blast out of the top of a propane cylinder, so It was bottom blast by default really, but it worked for him, using charcoal, till he had made some money and bought a propane one. Thanks for your kind words!
            Phil
            https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKf...XltBjj7MWtdjWA

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            • #7
              I had the sound off so apologies if this was covered in the film, but what is the orange coating you used? Between the ash, water, and heat, I would think it is an extremely challenging environment for a coating.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hermetic View Post
                Thank you! I think that bottom blast is mainly a US thing, and side blast a British one. I have certainly never seen a bottom blast in the UK, and didn't know they existed till seeing them on forum pics! My cousins son is a knifemaker in leeds, and I made him a bottom blast out of the top of a propane cylinder, so It was bottom blast by default really, but it worked for him, using charcoal, till he had made some money and bought a propane one. Thanks for your kind words!
                Phil
                https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKf...XltBjj7MWtdjWA
                I think the bottom blast came about because they were cheaper to make in bulk and easier to carry about (more portable). After about 35 years of standing next to an anvil, I have come to believe the side blast is a better design for general work.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
                  I had the sound off so apologies if this was covered in the film, but what is the orange coating you used? Between the ash, water, and heat, I would think it is an extremely challenging environment for a coating.
                  It is old fashioned red lead paint, the brown is a rust converter based on phosphoric acid. The paint on the body of the forge will probably be ok, the paint on the canopy, where all the heat will be, is anybody's guess!! if it peels, it peels. All the finishes are designed for metal, and I know the brown phosphoric acid stuff is good with fairly high temps, and I wont be using it every day. The flue canopy is connected to a manifold with powered heat extraction, so it would not get as hot an a "nomally aspirated" one. The problem is one of "once I have a paintbrush in my hand, there's no stopping me" Thanks for the interest and kind words to all!
                  Phil
                  UK

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