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OT: Sad day in aviation: Collings B17 has crashed

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  • I have read that in "general aviation", the majority of engine problems occur within 50 to 100 hours of a significant overhaul. One could ask "what kind of overhaul increases the chance of an engine problem?", and I am told that the answer is "most of them".

    The story seems to be that whenever you mess with an engine that has been running, there is a chance of fouling something up. And unless there are two people working and cross-checking, mess-ups may easily go undetected until the aircraft is flying.

    A "poor safety culture" would tend toward things being left undone, and mess-ups being undetected, lack of testing, etc. And maybe the boss-man (presumably an A&P with inspection cert) instructing the mechanic to not do something, omit a check, etc.

    BTW, the lnk to the FAA report is to Scribd, which requires you to sign up with them to see anything.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 03-26-2020, 08:11 PM.
    CNC machines only go through the motions

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    • @ J Tiers "BTW, the lnk to the FAA report is to Scribd, which requires you to sign up with them to see anything."

      I'm able to see all 7 pages of the document without payment - maybe this is my one and only freebie?

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      • Originally posted by tlfamm View Post
        @ J Tiers "BTW, the lnk to the FAA report is to Scribd, which requires you to sign up with them to see anything."

        I'm able to see all 7 pages of the document without payment - maybe this is my one and only freebie?
        I tried it a third time, and that time it did indeed let me see the text. Go figure.....
        CNC machines only go through the motions

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        • I read that report too. So sad that someone used safety wire to restrain the cable from the magneto to keep it from shorting to the head. They inadvertently caused the short that they were trying to prevent. The second magneto on that engine was barely working.

          It's amazing that the plane felt like it was running smooth enough to take off.
          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

          Location: SF East Bay.

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          • Well, I'm both sad and very angry to read this.

            But glad that I got to fly in both of these bombers when I did.

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            • Being from the era of the B-17, I can only remember seeing one in the air and one on the ground. The WWII war birds are in a league of their own. It is sad to see one of the few left destroyed. I was unable to read the story of this crash, so I don't know if those on board was lost or not. Sad day in aviation history.
              _____________________________________________

              I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
              Oregon Coast

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              • {Reactivating old thread}

                The NTSB has released its report on the B-17 crash at Bradley Airport, Connecticut on Oct 2, 2019.

                Press release:
                https://www.ntsb.gov/news/press-rele...20210413a.aspx

                Report (PDF download; 24 pages, 5.6 MB):
                https://u7061146.ct.sendgrid.net/ls/...glEDEnmwS8Q-3D

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                • My father, Roy Ostling, grew up in Seattle. After graduating from UW with a BSME he started working for Boeing in 1937. His first year was spent on the drawing board in the Red Barn (Plant 1). When WWII production ramped up he worked on the B17, and after 1941 he was a supervisor. He retired in 1977 after forty years at Boeing.

                  In 1992, at age 77, he learned about the restoration project of 42-29782, a B17-F. He drove down to the Museum of Flight, introduced himself, and asked if they needed additional help. They were quite surprised -- for a year or more they had been poring over blueprints, almost all of which had Roy's approval signature. They were quite happy to have him as a consultant to the team. He went there at least once a week until the first flight, in 1995.

                  He never flew on a B17 during his career. As far as I know, neither did the three other Boeing engineers, carpool neighbors in our Magnolia neighborhood. He could have flown on the restored plane, but he chose not to.

                  He did get three coffee cups for his sons. Here is the one I see every morning before facing the new day. I just rinsed it out so it is wet. (Nobody in Phoenix bothers to dry anything.)


                  Click image for larger version

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                  Last edited by aostling; 04-16-2021, 12:21 AM.
                  Allan Ostling

                  Phoenix, Arizona

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