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OT: Sad day in aviation: Collings B17 has crashed

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  • #16
    Sad.
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
    You will find that it has discrete steps.

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    • #17
      I had the pleasure of riding in the Nine-o-nine three years ago. I won't say that it was a great experience. I'll let the picture speak for itself.


      That's my reaction shortly after take off from the Livermore, Ca airport. I'd waited 4 hours for the flight.

      Some pictures of the plane...

      A view of Concord California from the navigator/bombardier's seat (a couple thousand feet up)


      How about a couple of videos of my flight? The first one is the 909 taking off just an hour before my flight. Totally unedited. It's only 30 seconds. I can't get the links to show up as video, so you will need to click on the link to view.
      https://imgur.com/dJtR5sS
      The second one is the side gunner's view during a takeoff. 60 seconds.
      https://i.imgur.com/BwNzTHI.mp4

      It's a miracle that any of the passengers survived. Note that all of us were sitting on the floor on thin cushions. When we took off there was a person in the bombardier's seat as well.
      Last edited by danlb; 10-03-2019, 11:00 AM.
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

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      • #18
        The only warbird I ever rode on was a PBY Catalina, out of Miami. Remember it very well to this day. Be ashame to make them all static displays.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RB211 View Post
          Reports of the #3 engine taking a dump. I have no idea on a B17 how much that would affect climb out with 13 people on board.
          As to the question about flying these things still, let me ask a question as a rebuttal. Should we still run steam locomotives or make them all static displays?
          On the news last night they had the pilot saying he wanted to return due to #4 engine,,,

          either way, i never thought just losing one engine on something like this and with such a light load would be such a factor, I think they stated they had 900ft when things shot craps...

          it is very sad indeed

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          • #20
            Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
            On the news last night they had the pilot saying he wanted to return due to #4 engine,,,

            either way, i never thought just losing one engine on something like this and with such a light load would be such a factor, I think they stated they had 900ft when things shot craps...

            it is very sad indeed
            It's puzzling, perhaps the prop didn't feather and created a lot of drag. No idea what really happened. Flying those things is an entirely different world than what I am now used to. I am spoiled by insane amounts of excess thrust. An engine out for me is a non event almost. Used to instruct multi-engine in light reciprocating twins and an engine out was a very critical thing that was life and death. Sad day for aviation.

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            • #21
              There are four of us in our 70's who try to do bucket list things together and we were considering catching a ride when they were at Oxford Airport.
              I think doctor appointments, etc. got in the way this time so it was not to be.
              Rather chilling anyway but I'm reminded of an uncle's superstition.
              He flew for American and had several of his own but always cautioned "never fly in a plane that's been in an accident!".

              Prophetic?
              Hard to say but 17's flew in worse condition than 909 was and with less experienced pilots.
              I have some pictures of a 17 flying over our house some years ago...with a puzzling addition in one shot.
              I'll get them posted.
              Len

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              • #22




                In the second photo...what the hell was that below and behind?!
                Len

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
                  In the second photo...what the hell was that below and behind?!
                  A drone

                  Sorry George lol

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                  • #24
                    they will stop flying them when one too many has crashed.

                    anent the comparison with steam locomotives - steam locomotives are made from more robust material, and altitude is not a variable.

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                    • #25
                      They'll probably stop flying them when it's no longer economically viable to due so. I imagine most of those old warbirds are kept in the air primarily by passionate volunteers, and when those start to dry up, and move on... it will no longer make financial sense to keep them up. If more people try and keep them out of the sky I'm sure that would only speed up the process. Hopefully that doesn't happen. I love the old flying history, and it's very unfortunate that this one crashed and people lost their lives. Wishing a speedy recovery to the others who were injured.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post

                        In the second photo...what the hell was that below and behind?!
                        That's perplexing - did you try blowing it up?

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                        • #27
                          The Collins foundation gives rides at events to help support the effort. I recall my flight was a around $500, and for around $1000 I could have flown in a P51 Mustang.

                          They do it because they love it.

                          Dan
                          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                          Location: SF East Bay.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                            That's perplexing - did you try blowing it up?
                            It just gets pixelated.
                            Looks like a fire hydrant!

                            Those photos are literally just seconds apart but no hint of it in the first pic or the last.
                            I asked the neighbors if anything was found. The houses aren't all that far apart but thick oak forest all around.
                            They hadn't detected anything unusual.
                            And those trees are too tall for anyone to toss anything in the air.

                            It's my first UFO over dry land.
                            Len

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post

                              In the second photo...what the hell was that below and behind?!
                              I first thought: a runaway flying pig balloon from a Pink Floyd concert, but on second look perhaps a bug.
                              George
                              Traverse City, MI

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                                A drone

                                Sorry George lol
                                But was it below 400ft AGL?

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