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  • ulav8r
    replied
    Same jib idea as above, but add a leg on the end to support during a lift. Might need to be removable to get out of the way after use. Use a 2' square base on casters, 2 inch pipe upright to wedge under end of jib.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Looking at the pics, I see a concrete block wall. That will hold a lot of weight.

    So....think of a library.....a track set high on the concrete wall, and a guide track set into the floor (might need some chipping there.....)

    A vertical "A" frame running on the floor track, with a beam across that runs on the wall track.

    A hoist runs on that cross beam. From teh pics it looks like it could then cover most if not all the machines.

    If the floor track is not possible, you could just run to the opposite wall and amother wall track. But that makes your beam need to be deeper. Might not clear both the Bridgeport and that wall cabinet.....I'd move the cabinet, but........

    At least the Bridgeport is on the side of the shed with the high side of the roof.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hmm Dave, I believe thats an X-ray of a Woman!
    Notice the wide hips, and how the can is positioned.

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  • ibewgypsie
    replied
    Ohh my..

    http://poetry.rotten.com/potatoes-n-...-n-jelly-1.jpg

    Bet that sounded like a honda when he passed that.. Haruumph...



    [This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 10-02-2004).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Jaymo
    replied
    Those glorified pallet jacks with masts are called stackers.

    Am I correct in assuming that an engine hoist would not work?

    Wouldn't need counterweight if outriggers/loadwheels are used.

    Leave a comment:


  • moldmonkey
    replied
    John-8 foot reach. Yeah, that would get real tippy. (Is that a word?)

    Everybody keep the ideas coming. I think we all suffer from not enough space and a need to move heavy things.

    Jon Bohlander

    Leave a comment:


  • ibewgypsie
    replied
    Didn't you post a similar ideal on the "helpful hints section"

    A crane on a bridgy.. or did it die a untimely death? A one foot crane w/swivel mounted on machine and foot that supports a light I-beam is probably what you need. Steady, and strong and able to swivel out of the way. I saw aluminum Ibeam on one lathe for a rig like this.

    I liked the pedal car w.lift.. I have a real wrecker in the yard, My shop truck has sat since I moved it here.. A real shop truck has a crane on the back.

    ------------------
    David Cofer, Of:
    Tunnel Hill, North Georgia

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike W
    replied
    I am glad I work in the electronics field. I have a come along to lift the 200 pound vacuum tube. Not needed with transistors.

    Leave a comment:


  • ARFF79
    replied
    John, Ever think to use a "Sky Crane/Hook" ? It used to be advertised in Enco catalogs among others. It attatches to the rear of your lathe bed and is good for up to around 750 lbs if my memory serves. it is removable and the photos in the ad used to show several burly men fighting with a large shaft(varying diameters,4"-8" by about 40" long)followed by one person loading the same shaft with the hook.
    I also seem to remember an HMS or Projects article where some one made up something similar that fit in the lathe bed to aid in chuck removal and placement. It also was mountable on his milling machine bed.

    Leave a comment:


  • zl1byz
    replied
    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by John Stevenson:
    Mould, That is neat. They list 2 tons for this, how do they stop it tipping over ?

    John S.
    </font>
    Yes seems to defy the law of physics doesn't it John

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Mould, That is neat. They list 2 tons for this, how do they stop it tipping over ?

    To use an form of jib crane from the rear I need to have a reach of about 8 foot to lift from in front of the lathe.
    Half a ton at 8 foot is some serious leverage and to be right it would really have to lift 2.2 times this for a safety factor.

    I think this does away with any design that uses an unsupported beam.

    My answer would be to get more room but that's not possible either.
    I still have a Bridgy CNC and that grinder I stole off Alistair outside under sheets and I bought another drill grinder today.
    I allready have a Brierley drill grinder so I thought with dark nights approaching if I got another one I could breed them

    John S.

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  • moldmonkey
    replied
    John,

    At work they talked about buying a heavy duty cart with a crane for lifting and moving mold cavities and cores. Your idea reminds of that. I tried to do a search for it. No luck but i did find this. Half way down is a rotatable shop crane. Something like that on a smaller scale might do the job.

    http://www.aiplen.com/crane.htm

    We do have a die cart like several people have shown. They are handy especially as a portable, height adjustable worktable but do have a nasty habit of rolling away as you slide the part off.

    [This message has been edited by moldmonkey (edited 10-01-2004).]

    Leave a comment:


  • WJHartson
    replied
    John,I have seen some of the pro stock racers use sonething similar to what you are looking for to remove the engines from the cars. They have a pocket mounted on the wall of their trailer that will accept an I beam and lock into place with a pin. I think the beam was aluminum. The other end of the beam want to a leg structure outside the trailer. They had a small electric hoist mounted on the I beam via a trolley so they could lift and roll the engine from the car outside the trailer to the inside of the trailer. The hoist and trolley didn't take up much room overhead IIRC about 8 to 10". The hoist was rated for 1000 pounds and the beam was about 12 feet long, longer than you need. The engine was moved into position on a wheeled cradle which is like your stand to support the rotor.

    I also have a boom that attaches to a forktruck. It is rated for 250 lbs but may be good for some ideas. See pictures.




    Joe

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  • ibewgypsie
    replied


    David Cofer, Of:
    Tunnel Hill, North Georgia



    [This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 10-01-2004).]

    Leave a comment:


  • ibewgypsie
    replied


    HUH, won't this work? We used to always cut a hole in the ceiling and call in a crane.

    [This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 10-01-2004).]

    Leave a comment:

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