Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT Video editing

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OT Video editing

    I have tried dozens of these free ones and the trial versions of others and ALL of them go on and on about how easy it is to assemble the various bit and all the grand other crap that can be done with special effects. I can do that part with any of the ones BUT NONE of them seem to even mention the case of separating a 3 Gig file (from a VCR tape) into the dozen or so separate categories and naming them, saving them to a folder so they can be sorted as to subject so they can then be put together. There can be on one tape, for example; National Parks, family reunions, flower gardens, weather pictures, etc .
    So does anyone have a suggestion for a program that will be able to extract all these pieces and store them with suitable names and dates such as to be able to re-combine in like subject groups for then burning to DVDs?????
    Thanks for any ideas.
    ...Lew...

  • #2
    You're asking what's the right video editor- assuming that you're past the point of needing to get the information on the tape transferred to a workable computer file. VCR to computer is probably a pretty straightforward input card, and some of the supplied software does at least work to get the job done. From there, I'd sure like to have a decent program to work the files with. There are definitely better programs out there, free ones too, that easily outdo the software that comes with the Windows versions.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

    Comment


    • #3
      The last time I ran into a similar problem, it was a 4 GB video file from a cam-corder. I found that the editing program that I used was reading the whole file into memory for speedy editing. Unfortunately, I only had 4 GB of RAM, so it did not work very well.

      I chopped the file into 4 parts using the split(1) linux program*. Then I was able to edit each piece, marking the parts that I wanted to stitch together and saving them to disk for merging later.

      The best solution is to find a video editing program that does not try to read the whole file into memory.



      Dan

      * There may be a windows program that splits files into equal parts .
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

      Comment


      • #4
        I had a program called hi-split and hi-join, that seemed to work well for me.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a program for video editing from Grass Valley called Edius Workgroup. It will do exactly what you want to do with folders and such. It isn't cheap but it is capable. It is used by TV stations for their news program video editing. Grass Valley being big in the TV station broadcast world.

          They do have a trial version you could use I think. They have a lower level package also that will do what you want and it only costs a few hundred dollars I think. If this is a one time thing then the trials will work for you.

          What computer system do you have for doing your video editing? Lots of memory is crucial.

          Do you already have your VHS tapes captured to digital media as in a harddrive? That will be your first step.
          Location: The Black Forest in Germany

          How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

          Comment


          • #6
            I use my MacBook Pro, running MacOS, using Final Cut Pro X.
            Yes, I actually am recommending a Mac, and Final Cut Pro X...
            If you want to use Windows, people like Sony Vegas? for the price. Mac has no issues with file size. Fat32 file systems have issues. So either switch to NTFS or what ever Mac uses.
            It is super duper easy to take your giant multi gig source file in Final Cut Pro X in the project file and pull snippets off of it and drop them onto the time line.
            My old 2013 MacBook pro has no issues editing 4k source files. I plug in an external HD for storing all my source files.

            Comment


            • #7
              "...separating a 3 Gig file (from a VCR tape) into the dozen or so separate categories and naming them, saving them to a folder so they can be sorted as to subject so they can then be put together."

              A basic method of doing this would be to make a copy of the original file with Windows File Explorer and giving it a new name that reflects the part of it you are going to keep. You can also create a new folder for it and similar clips and put it in that folder. Then open it in any editor and cut off the material that is not part of the segment you are creating. This could be as easy as trimming the beginning and the end of the file. Then save what is left. Repeat this for each of the segments of the original file that you wish to save individually.

              Of course this involves two programs, File Explorer and your editor. Most editors will allow you to copy parts of a video track to a new track and then saving that new track by a new file name. So you could disassemble a large file into segments totally within the one editing program. I would look for the more traditional editors that have their roots in the professional ones. Many of the "easy to use" ones that are promoted by the popular video platforms will make this more difficult. Look for things like a "time line" and the ability to make and use multiple tracks.

              As for organization, that is probably totally up to you. Some of those popular editors may have this as a built in feature, but it is probably just creating file folders on your hard drive (or cloud) just as you can create them with File Explorer. And, if anything, using File Explorer yourself probably gives you more control. And you can probably mix the methods. The better, professionally based editors, will probably not have that feature as it is unnecessary and can be confusing.



              Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
              I have tried dozens of these free ones and the trial versions of others and ALL of them go on and on about how easy it is to assemble the various bit and all the grand other crap that can be done with special effects. I can do that part with any of the ones BUT NONE of them seem to even mention the case of separating a 3 Gig file (from a VCR tape) into the dozen or so separate categories and naming them, saving them to a folder so they can be sorted as to subject so they can then be put together. There can be on one tape, for example; National Parks, family reunions, flower gardens, weather pictures, etc .
              So does anyone have a suggestion for a program that will be able to extract all these pieces and store them with suitable names and dates such as to be able to re-combine in like subject groups for then burning to DVDs?????
              Thanks for any ideas.
              ...Lew...
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
              You will find that it has discrete steps.

              Comment


              • #8
                Paul,
                Did you ever run into or use Edius in any of the TV stations where you worked?
                Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                Comment


                • #9
                  BF, I looked into those TV ones WOW $$$$ Not for me . Thanks. :-)
                  ...lew...
                  PS Paul I can't find any thing called File Explorer on my pgms.
                  ..lew..
                  Last edited by Lew Hartswick; 10-11-2019, 02:16 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    How many tapes do you have to do? Is it just one or many?
                    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      No, sorry. I did not. It looks like a more recent offering from Grass Valley. Grass Valley has been in the professional TV field for a long, long time and I have worked in places that used earlier products from them. And, of course, they were THE place to go to for the analog video switchers that almost every TV station that was a TV station used for decades for their productions.

                      Edius is probably a top notch product. the first release was in 2003 and they are up to V9.10 so it appears to be a healthy product. It seems that some versions are quite reasonable in price. But then I am familiar with five figure prices.





                      Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
                      Paul,
                      Did you ever run into or use Edius in any of the TV stations where you worked?
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                      You will find that it has discrete steps.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        PS Paul I can't find any thing called File Explorer on my pgms.
                        ..lew..
                        Lew,

                        If you have Windows it has been called by various names. It is simply the program that lists the files on the hard drive. I have it in tool bar that pops up at the bottom (or top or side if you moved it there) of a Windows screen. It shows up as a file folder. It has been in every Microsoft operating system. It started as the "Dir" or Directory command back in the days of DOS. It has been called "My Computer" and a host of other names.

                        Apple also has it and probably with a similar multiplicity of names. It has been a while since I used an Apple. Phone and pad operating systems try hard not to have this in an obvious place because most users don't understand it and can get into trouble with it, but I suspect it is still there in all of them. Access to the files on the various disk (and other types of) storage devices is almost the first thing that the developers of a computer's operating system create. Every computer I have ever used that had disk storage had such a program.
                        Paul A.
                        SE Texas

                        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                        You will find that it has discrete steps.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I found quite a few articles on how to convert VHS tapes to digital format that can then be edited on a computer with any of many software packages that range from free to a hundred bucks or so:

                          If you've got a mountain of unlabeled youth soccer games and bar mitzvah compilations from 1989 threatening a VHS avalanche in your basement, it may be time to fast-forward into the 21st century. Professional VHS-to-DVD transfer services...


                          The best ways to digitally transfer and store all your old analog VHS home videos.




                          I have a simple app called "Video Editor". I have also used an app called "Power Director", as well as the "Windows Live Movie Maker", but I think it has been discontinued and blocked from use on Win10.

                          Depending on video file format, it may not work to simply split long files into shorter segments. One of my backup programs split some of my larger raw video files into shorter (100 Mb?) segments, and they could not be opened and viewed until stitched back together.
                          Last edited by PStechPaul; 10-12-2019, 04:18 AM.
                          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                          USA Maryland 21030

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Lew, which program(s) do you have or like? It is a simple process to do what you want actually. The area where most of your media is stored for use in the editor is called the bin. Load your file into the bin and then left click and drag it to the timeline area. After it is on your timeline start from the beginning of the timeline and press the I key. That will mark the segments in or start position. Then play the timeline(usually the spacebar is the start and stop of the play back)until you come to the end of the section you want to separate from the file. Then press the O key on your keyboard. That sets the out or end point of the clip you will save. On all my editors I press F11 to bring up the export dialog box. You will then pick the file format you want to save the clip in and this is important, make sure you check the box to export between in and out points. Then click export and it will bring up a save box dialog. Navigate to the folder you want to save the file to, for example, National Parks. Then just hit save or export and you are done. Go back to your editing program if you are not already there automatically and delete the in and out points on your timeline. On mine I just have to hit the X key. You will see the highlighted part of the timeline you just exported return to the same color as the rest of the timeline. Then just go through the tape and repeat. You can do all the segments for say, National Parks first or you can go through the file start to finish and just export to what ever folder you make for each topic. National Parks, Weather, Flowers, etc. etc.. There is normally a batch export ability in most editors. This would allow you to go through your timeline and select and export all the same theme and then export all the clips in one go. This save time if you have a lot of files. You can hit the batch export button and then go have dinner. You will need to make the folders ahead of time you will nee. They are made just like any other folder you make on your computer. You select which drive you want to save to and then create the individual folders or create a master folder and sub folders for each category.

                            If you need me to break it down even more let me know........you can do it I am sure.
                            Last edited by Black Forest; 10-12-2019, 12:28 PM.
                            Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                            How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              For cutting out unwanted video portions I use Windows Movie Maker, from Microsoft. Simple, easy to use, lacks many of the wonderful features you may need later in the editing process, but also free and can be quickly downloaded and put to use. I do not think Microsoft supports it anymore.

                              If you cut some portions out, you can save it to a project, then go back to your original (unclipped) video, do the same thing over again until you get precisely what you are seeking. When you have separated the original into the required segments or projects, you can output them into various various formats.

                              There is lots of support out there for this rather basic product. Its simplicity is key to its popularity.

                              Dan
                              Salem, Oregon

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X