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  • radial arm saw repair.

    First of all it seems radial arm saws are like shapers and becoming extinct. I was asked about a repair to a rockwell delta radial where the nut for the travel leadscrew is stripped. It is a 5/8 l hand 8tpi thread. The nut seems to be aluminium.
    What would they they used in the day. Would ali not be a bad choice of material. Would a repair in brass be feasible as pb is too expensive.?

  • #2
    Is this the height adjustment? The ali or perhaps Mazak part would be easy to cast and last through the warranty. Brass would be fine. You might be able to make it longer if there is room to give more wear surface. It is a zero precision usage unlike a lathe leadscrew and backlash not important either. I expect nobody ever thinks of lubrication on the reasonable basis that it would gunge up with sawdust however candle wax and ptfe chain lube are options.

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    • #3
      I bet brass would last better than the original. I wish tool makers would use more of it.

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      • #4
        I don't think radial arm saws have become extinct, I think it's the people that use them are what is becoming extinct.

        Now here is a saw that has become extinct.

        JL...............

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        • #5
          Could one use the evanut for this or would the stresses be too high.?

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          • #6
            I've been using my Craftsman 10" RAS since the early 60s . Made quite a few devices for it in the years since to make precision adjustments possible. If there are other "dedicated" RAS users interested it the devices let me know. I'll be happy to elucidate. :-)
            ...lew...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
              I've been using my Craftsman 10" RAS since the early 60s . Made quite a few devices for it in the years since to make precision adjustments possible. If there are other "dedicated" RAS users interested it the devices let me know. I'll be happy to elucidate. :-)
              ...lew...
              I grew up using a RAS. My dad still has it. When I needed a saw for a project a friend who was helping me convinced me to get a table saw. At first I was not a huge fan, but the two of us went through it and set everything up properly. His dad was a cabinet maker and furniture restorer, and its what he was used to. I still wanted my own RAS, and when I had the extra cash I bought one. A 230V 2HP 12" Delta. I bought it brand new and it was not cheap.

              I use the table saw all the time. A few weeks ago I unplugged the RAS, and rolled it out of the way because I never use it, so I could use the spot for a new metal cutting vertical bandsaw.
              *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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              • #8
                My old Rockwell 14" RAS had a bronze nut, so I think brass/bronze would be fine. This is most likely for the height adjustment,which isn't a precision screw anyway. If you were closer I would loan you my 5/8-8 thread tap.
                I just need one more tool,just one!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                  I don't think radial arm saws have become extinct, I think it's the people that use them are what is becoming extinct.

                  Now here is a saw that has become extinct.

                  JL...............

                  Agreed. The ole' swing saw. Never ran one but I bet dangerous.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
                    I've been using my Craftsman 10" RAS since the early 60s . Made quite a few devices for it in the years since to make precision adjustments possible. If there are other "dedicated" RAS users interested it the devices let me know. I'll be happy to elucidate. :-)
                    ...lew...
                    I've had mine since 1977 and use it all the time so please elucidate away
                    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                    Lewis Grizzard

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                    • #11
                      My dad used one in his construction company, and he kept it for all the years afterwards. I have it now, but have converted it into a sliding head drill press. My friends dad still uses his RAS.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #12
                        I think the radial arm saws were aimed at the construction industry. Take it to a job site and cut your lumber on it. The advent of the chop saw put an end to that because they were smaller and easier to drag around. Then the radial arm saw was a product that had no home as it's light construction did not provide the accuracy needed for a shop saw.

                        The radial arm saw had and has a bad reputation for poor accuracy. This was due to a flimsy table that would flex in every direction. I purchased one (a Craftsman) for my last employer where I needed something for making wood projects there. It was almost a bad mistake because when I tried to set it up per the manufacturer's directions, it simply would not hold the settings. What I discovered was that when I moved it, even an inch or less, between the various steps in the set ups, the table would twist due to the uneven concrete floor and my previous adjustments were completely lost.

                        My solution was to add leveling feet to the legs and TYING IT DOWN TO THE FLOOR SO IT COULD NOT MOVE. That did it. It set up perfectly and I could make cuts that were completely square and accurate. And it retained that accuracy for years until it had to be moved to another location. It was in a location where there was some space and I added side tables so it could handle 8 and 10 foot long lumber and, with a helper, full 4' x 8' sheets of plywood. It was a great set-up. I would put one in my personal shop, but there is no room for it. I now use a track saw as my first choice for large work and a table saw for smaller stuff.
                        Paul A.
                        SE Texas

                        Make it fit.
                        You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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                        • #13
                          I'll admit a soft spot for RAS's. I have a Delta 12", a Dewalt 12", a 14" Dewalt with a long output shaft for a dado head, and my favorite, a 22" Black and Decker/ Dewalt.

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                          • #14
                            My Dad has a Craftsman RAS that he bought in the early
                            70’s, he sold it, and then later found the same
                            one and bought it back. The people that had
                            it modified the wiring because they couldn’t
                            find the key, but my dad knew exactly where
                            the key was because he had taped it to the
                            under side of the table. He said well here’s
                            the key, the people never looked underneath
                            the saw. Of course who would think to look
                            under the saw for a key?
                            He now uses it in his canjo making business.

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                            • #15
                              I think machine tools are only as dangerous
                              as the operator. You need to familiarize
                              yourself with the machine, know its
                              capabilities and limitations, and remember
                              safety first.

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