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Leblond Regal 15x30

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  • Leblond Regal 15x30

    Can anyone shed some light as to the age of this machine? Any features that are desirable or undesirable compared to other models/years? I'm told it was used in a university setting and the ways are "like new." It comes with a Hardinge collet chuck, and a new import 3 jaw, but not much else. No steady, follow, taper attachment, etc... It's a 3hp 3ph unit, and I think it's just about the ideal machine for my space (garage shop so power and space start becoming issues if I go any larger). Should I jump on it if the condition is as he says? Or should I hold out for a better model?





  • #2
    Need more info - your location, price, intended use, budget?

    Are you able to eval the machine under power? Do you have experience evaluating lathes? That is an L0 spindle taper, which is typical for Regals. It is not as common or as convenient as a D1-6, but it is not scarce.

    http://www.lathes.co.uk/regal/page5.html

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    • #3
      SE Pennsylvania, price is $2850. Budget is undefined, I just want the right machine. Intended use is side work and various personal projects, so about as general as it gets. I can always turn down or outsource large work, but I would hate to deal with an underpowered, worn out, or Ill equipped machine, since it will be a very long term purchase.

      I can run it under power and have experience rebuilding and running lathes, but it’s a 5 hour drive and I want to get as much inout on it as I can. Thanks.

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      • #4
        If the ways are ok, machine sounds good and all the head stock gears are ok (that is the weakness of the Regals) then that is an amazing price for a LeBlond IMO.

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        • #5
          You are in a good location, with a good budget, so you should be able to find just about any lathe in a bit of time. The question is, which one?

          The long drive does make the inspection more challenging.
          Last edited by Glug; 10-15-2019, 11:27 PM.

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          • #6
            If you obtain the serial #, it's build date can be determined. You might be able to confirm it's first owner.

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            • #7
              a company i worked for had a 15x30 2 15x60's and a 21x120 they are good machines , i did alot of hard turning on the 15x30 it was a pleasure to run.
              also the ways are removable you can have them ground, scrape the saddle and be running again
              Last edited by coldformer; 10-16-2019, 03:30 AM. Reason: spelling

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              • #8
                $2850 sounds fair, no?

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                • #9
                  where's the steady rest?
                  at least for me, that would be a deal breaker

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                    where's the steady rest?
                    at least for me, that would be a deal breaker
                    Unfortunately no steady rest...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by maverick302 View Post
                      Can anyone shed some light as to the age of this machine?
                      I have a 13" LeBlond Regal that was made in the WW2 war years (forgotten just when); that 15" one looks to be a much more modern design. I'd guess from the mid-50's, or maybe even the 60's.

                      I think I paid $1800 for mine. It included both 3 and 4-jaw quality chucks, taper attachment, and a steady rest ...and I think a dead center for the tailstock.

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                      • #12
                        Do not take their word on the ways. They do wear, even the wider ones on those Regals. You will need to measure them and have drop dead cutoffs. The gears too. It takes quite a long while to test every single thread and feed.

                        The wear is often hard to see in photos. I have a friend who has a somewhat newer version of that lathe. I sometimes forward him similar machines that may go cheap at auction. Often he writes back that the machine has a lot of way wear. I've asked him to take a peak at this thread. Scraping the ways, etc, is a complete non-starter, in terms of hassle, effort and especially cost.

                        Another way to evaluate wear is to look for smoothing of edges on the top of the apron and saddle, from metal sliding and wearing. Based on that, I'd say that lathe has seen quite a lot of use. It looks like the paint has been selectively touched up.

                        There appears to be a huge chunk missing from the compound. I think I see uneven wear on the ways, suggesting they may be quite worn. It appears that the apron oil sightglass has been painted over - not a good sign.

                        The lack of a taper attachment and steady is a concern. $2850 is closer to top dollar for your area. The distance will add significant time, hassle and cost - especially hauling it in typical late fall weather. It is fortunate that Leblonds are fairly common. They are good machines.

                        It is nice that the Sjogren collet chuck is present, but I only paid $100 for mine. $200-$300 is more typical. An original steady is much harder to find.

                        With the info I see here, I would pass.

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                        • #13
                          It seems short to me, by the time you put a drill chuck in the tailstock and maybe a drill there won't by much room left. And it won't turn a very long shaft between centers either. I know most work is near the chuck but I would want a longer lathe.

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                          • #14
                            Hi,

                            Buy it. That price would be doubled for me. Had one that size, mine was made in the early 60s. Stout and powerful for its size.
                            If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by maverick302 View Post
                              SE Pennsylvania, price is $2850. Budget is undefined,

                              I can run it under power and have experience rebuilding and running lathes, but it’s a 5 hour drive and I want to get as much inout on it as I can. Thanks.
                              In Pa this month you have three power plants being auctioned and scrapped, plus numerous other industrial auctions. I'd look around a little more. If the machine is at Bid-Equip, I'd pass.

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