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  • voltage regulatuor

    I am trying to repair my can am 400. Is it hard to build a full wave regulator rectifier.. The magneto output is 12 volts and 60 watts. There are Six small coils in the magneto.One is a charging coil ones a trigger coil and then the four others are lighting coils. One group of two appear to go to the electronic box and are hooked to a white wire . The other two are seperate running to a yellow black wire and in the schematic turn into a orange wire, and the last one to a yellow wire. These last two run to the lighting wiring. Wow I wonder if anyone can understand all this. I am almost ready to have ny 1980 vintage enduro out for a ride but I need the lights opperational. Any help from the forum will be greatly appreciated. Thanx Mike (Auds Old Man)

  • #2
    Full wave rectifers are easy to build. Just do a search on the net. search for "rectifier schematic". You can build one with 2 diodes and a few caps. You can also buy them cheap in a package from any electronic store. A 60 watt one will be a bit more expensive. You may just want to build it. I am at work so can't send you a schematic. If you can't find a schematic let me know and I will send you one.

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    • #3
      .

      [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 09-02-2004).]

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      • #4
        With a center tapped transformer, two diodes will make a full wave rectifier. Can you show a schematic of this Audrey? It sounds so convoluted that it peaked my interest.

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        • #5
          .

          [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 09-02-2004).]

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          • #6
            You don't.

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            • #7
              Ok, it is not a bridge rectifier but it is a full wave rectifier.

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              • #8
                Yeah, you don't have a full wave bridge rectifier with two diodes, but you do get full wave output with two diodes and a center tapped winding. I had a similar problem with my sister's bike once where there wasn't enough output from the alternator. Was a bad ground connection from the 'y' winding to frame.
                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                • #9
                  http://www.tpub.com/neets/book7/27b.htm

                  http://www.tpub.com/neets/book7/27c.htm
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                  • #10
                    Ok, you've got the rectifier and the voltage down to about 6 volts. What are you electronic wizzes doing about the regulator? Add that in and the voltage will end up at about 4 volts! That should really help with lights and battery.

                    You shouldn't need any gizmos for the light circuit. Run the lights through a fuse and straight ac output from the mag. 5 amps is not going to be a lot of light anyway.

                    You're going to need more than 12 volts to charge a 12v battery. How did you measure the mag output? It's going to be AC so you need to measure using an RMS meter. For a 12v battery, you'll need at least 15v on the AC side. For a 6v battery, you'll need at least 8v on the AC side. (Just in case--some of the old bikes ran 6v)

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                    • #11
                      Use a shunt regulator. An NPN power transistor with a zener diode with current limit resistor connected to the base is all you need.

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                      • #12
                        Evan: The zener in your circuit will not function due to the base voltage (around 0.7) of the transistor. Also, a shunt regulator would draw significant power if the unregulated source has some amps behind it.

                        The circuit below will give you an output of approximately the zener voltage PLUS another 0.7 volts. Also, it does not waste much power. To select a power transistor, resistor and zener, you gotta know how many amps you want out.



                        Den

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                        • #13
                          In Evans circuit, swap the zener and resistor around.
                          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                          • #14
                            You could do that too but because it's a shunt regulator, when no current is being drawn, you're asking the circuit to dissipate all 60 watts or so.

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                            • #15
                              OR: Control the pass xistor with a volt. regulator.

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