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  • Climb cutting

    I have heard of climb cutting and saw a post about it. I don't get it? What is it and how does it work. Am I correct in assuming that it relates to milling?

    Thanks for your patience.

    Bob

  • #2
    Climb cutting is when the work feeds into the tool in the direction the tool is turning. Got it? OK, imagine a plain milling cutter on a horizontal milling machine. As you look at the end of the cutter it is rotating counterclockwise, and the work is feeding from left to right. Normal feed is from right to left, ie, the work feeds INTO the rotating teeth. With climb cutting the work feeds WITH the rotating teeth. Climb milling produces a smoother finish, but, because the work tends to be "pulled" along, it also requires a hefty machine to do it. Most non-CNC type mills aren't solid enough to permit climb cutting. Some even warn vehemently against doing it...will void warranties and such. I do it anyway...after making the final pass on a piece in the normal direction, I reverse the feed and do a climb cut WITHOUT CHANGING ANY SETTINGS. This way only a thou or two comes off and that the machine can handle. Gives a nice smooth finish.

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    • #3
      Backlash on the leadscrew get you into real trouble when climb milling. It will push and pull on the axis which isn't locked and cause the machine to sound like it's going to fall apart. With difficult to machine aluminum, I find climb milling works better but you have to go really slowly to prevent the chatter and vibration, unless as bdarin noted you have the machine to handle it.


      Albert


      [This message has been edited by Rotate (edited 06-18-2002).]

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      • #4
        As stated eloquently already, climb milling produces better finish, less chatter, and ejects the chips better - what was not stated was that it takes more horsepower as a thicker bite is taken out initially. Its biggest disadvantage is control of the work piece. It does require a solid machine - don't try this on a non-CNC machine. Doing so is apt to break the tool and damage the workpiece. Wood workers call this the "Hungry Way" of feeding the router or shaper. It has a tendency to throw the boards across the room, or into your testicles, or much worse.

        Conventional milling or routing has feed against the bit rotation. It it easier for backlash laden feed screws to control this as the force against the feed removes any backlash. This method requires less horsepower to mill the same cut the "Hungry Way" but often recuts chips several times as the tool does not cleanly eject the chip and it gets caught and recut again. This is part of the reson the finish is worse. The other reason is the initial cut starts as a scraping and grows thicker towards the end of the cutting cycle - opposite of Climb Milling. Conventional milling dulls the tools faster because of this.



        [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 06-18-2002).]

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        • #5
          You are all correct. However, Climb cutting is not as difficult or dangerous as you make it sound. I have done it and will continue to do it on manual mills remember these things:

          1. 4 flutes or more
          2. Very light radial depth of cut
          3. Raise the surface footage and decrease the chip load.
          4. Finish cuts only
          5. Do not use a roughing end mill.
          6. A high helix emill will work best.
          7. If you have to ask what climb cutting is do not try it yet. You need to put in more time at the mill so you can become more familiar with the physics involved.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the info.
            I have done this before, but didn't know what it was called. I did most of the tricks you mentioned but, learned by trial and error, but that's the fun of the hole thing.

            Their is nothing more rewarding than to figure something out on your own, and then hear from the experts you were on the right track!

            Bob

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            • #7
              Works good doesn't it Bob? Be careful there are some things you don't want to learn by trial and error. I have scars to prove it. Good luck

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              • #8
                C.Tate

                Yes. I am very saftey conscious. Almost lost my life four years ago. After a long rehab, I learned something-YOU CAN"T BE TOO CAREFULL!
                You have to take a little chance once in a while but you need to think it through.

                Bob

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                • #9
                  One thing that will help if you want to do climb milling is to snug up the table locks to a point that you just feel some resistance. I would not do this too often as it can effect ware on the table locks.
                  Charlie
                  Don\'t ask me to do a dam thing, I\'m retired.
                  http://home.earthlink.net/~kcprecision/

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                  • #10
                    C Tate.

                    Well said.

                    Did you get you new/used CNC lathe yet? I also talked to Mitutoyo today at an open house. He told me the that all the machines sold by B & S including the Leitz CMM and the Starrett use the same software (a package made in France). The Mitutoyos have three different softare packages: Japanese, US, and Canadian. He claims the Canadian package is the best of the three versions and includes auto measurement based on solid 3D models. Very nice - runs off a Dell Pentium 4.

                    If you are interested in a Okuma LC40 4 axis CNC 18"x40" Lathe with a side lift up conveyor and OSP3000L Control ($24,900 Canadian F.O.B. Edmonton) email George Chornohus [email protected] or 780-431-3406.

                    Thought you might be interested. George will tell you its condition.

                    Dave



                    [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 06-19-2002).]

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                    • #11
                      Thrud,
                      The job feel through we no longer need another machine thanks all the same. We have settled on a Zeiss CMM it is DCC and uses Calypso software.It has ceramic granite construction and automatic feature recognition. It is shiny too.

                      Thanks CT

                      Bob,
                      Nothing wrong with a calculated risk its the uncalculated ones that jump up and bite me in the behind.


                      [This message has been edited by C. Tate (edited 06-20-2002).]

                      [This message has been edited by C. Tate (edited 06-21-2002).]

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                      • #12
                        CT
                        Calypso - that's the French Software I could not remember. That is a good machine - keep the monkeys off it!

                        Dave

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                        • #13
                          I having one of those days again - nothing is comming out "shiny" - except my head!

                          Oh, to not be senile and push the wrong button - dang!



                          [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 06-20-2002).]

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                          • #14
                            Thrud,

                            Excuse my spelling now and in the future. I don't have spell check available when using this board and my spelling is horrible. I used to try hard not to embarrass myself but gave up after I turned thirty. Now I just apologize and continue on.

                            [This message has been edited by C. Tate (edited 06-21-2002).]

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                            • #15
                              C. Tate:
                              No apology required nor expected. I was just excited to see the word "Shiney"! I like Shiney, shiney is good, not shiney bad! I spell wrong too - I blame my fat fingers for not listening, but then realise they have no ears and have an excuse. I wish I had a good excuse...

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