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  • 110 vs 220

    I got a 1 hp motor for my Rockwell 10 lathe. It's a 110/220 reversible. I know that it'll draw more amps at 110 but hooking it up to 220 is no problem. Which would be the best route? The only reason I'm thinking about 110 is because I'll need to buy a 220 breaker and pull some wire for 220. With 110 I can just plug it up. Pros/cons of each?
    Thanke
    Hooking it up to the reversing switch is gonna be fun. Have to study on it awhile...

    ------------------
    Hoffman in Warner Robins Ga
    Techno-Anarchist

  • #2
    I think you will find that with the lower amperage for a given conductor size you will run cooler. I have had motors which consistently tripped the temp protector while 110, but have never been a problem with 220.

    Ed

    ------------------
    ELB
    Ed Bryant

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    • #3
      Go with 220. The amperage will be cut in
      half and the motor will live longer. When
      wires get hot, you're wasting power too.

      Comment


      • #4
        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by maddog:
        Go with 220. The amperage will be cut in
        half and the motor will live longer. When
        wires get hot, you're wasting power too.
        </font>
        I'm not argueing against the better way, which is the 220 hookup...

        No matter which way a motor is hooked up, the current that flows in and the voltage across each coil INSIDE that motor is EXACTLY the same. In the 110 volt hookup two coils are in parallel and in the 220 volt hookup they are in series. The result is that the voltage across each coil in both hookups is 110 volts. In the series 220 hookup the same current flows in each coil because they are in series. In the parallel, 110 hookup, once again same current flows in each coil but twice that current flows in the parallel combination.

        But there are no differences in current, voltage, heat, etc. in any single coil inside the motor.

        As for Ed's statement, he is likely right because the double current had to flow in the wires between the electric pole and the motor. By Ohms law, the voltage drop in those lines is the I * R. The resistance is the same for the same size wire (most houses and commercial buildings use #12 for most common circuits) but the current is twice as much with the 110 volt hookup. So the voltage drop is twice as much. More power is lost in the wires leading to the motor. More important, less power is available at the motor so it can stall easier. Stall = more heat (in wires and in motor), more current, and tripped breaker.

        Use 220 if possible. It is the better solution. That's why they have it in the first place.

        Of course if we are talking about one Amp vs two, then the above may be moot.

        Paul A.
        Paul A.

        Make it fit.
        You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

        Comment


        • #5
          If you want the machine up and running in a hurry you can wire it up 110 and watch it go. Just pull wire and run 220 as soon as possible. As bad as you've apparently got the bug (and being in the profession you know there is no pill for it), you'll be needing a 3ph converter eventually and you'll definitely want 220 for that.
          If you were me:
          220 to shop, 110 outlets 48" high every 3-4 feet, rotary phase converter, and more lighting than an operating room.
          You might want to run the 220 and/or 3ph lines thru conduit inside the wall so you can more easily change the wiring layout later (inevitable).

          Comment


          • #6
            If the Lathe was originally wired for 110v then I probably would just wire the new motor in and make chips. You will get a little more power and the motor will run a little cooler with 220v power but you probably won't be able to tell the difference. If you take heavy cuts you can realize a little more power from the 220v source otherwise the lathe works the same. Thechnically, 220v is the best choice.

            Comment


            • #7
              Here by code the absolute max you can run on a dedicated 110 circuit is 30amps.Since your motor will draw at least 10 [email protected] and may in fact spike to 40amps or more on startup,that 30amp circuit will be loaded with just the lathe.That said there is still nothing wrong with a 110 setup,so long as the wire is up to the task.

              [This message has been edited by wierdscience (edited 11-23-2004).]
              I just need one more tool,just one!

              Comment


              • #8
                The current in the windings in the motor is the same for 120 or 240 volts. With 120 volts the windings are paralled and in 240 volts the windings are connected in series. Same curent. The big savings comes in reducing the power drop in the supply lines. (Amps squared times the resistance)

                JRW

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you run a new wire, I'd suggest at least 6 gauge, but 4 preferably.

                  Amperage goes fast when you get into machines!

                  First a lathe, then a welder, then...****, you can't run them both at the same time.

                  we have a 200 Amp for the house, then a 60 A subpanel in the garage and I wish I had more. Had I not got everything for free (ok, less than 10 dollars), I would have put in more.

                  -jacob

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What I did was run 10-3 to quad boxes 48" up the wall every 4' so I have the potential for 220 at any point if needed... cost wise only a few pennies more pre foot. I'd go with the 220 wiring on the motor. Remember you should never load a circuit more then 80% of it value for safety. Far better to run more circuits then to chance a fire behind a wall.
                    Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I just got my studio redone;200 amp service,ran six 220 lines for my table saw,big drill press,die filer,wood lathe,big buffer,big band saw,dust collecter,planer,small buffer line,soon a big compressor and even AC! I know many things can be done with 110,but so much more versatile is 220,anyway you can help our machines do their processes,you will come out ahead. That goes for 3phase or 440 for the more serious machinists in this group.Just my two cents,something like electric power;stretch your self to get up to the next step,it will pay off.
                      Dick Stack-Hillsdale Art Metal

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Paul Alciatore:
                        I'm not argueing against the better way, which is the 220 hookup...

                        No matter which way a motor is hooked up, the current that flows in and the voltage across each coil INSIDE that motor is EXACTLY the same. In the 110 volt hookup two coils are in parallel and in the 220 volt hookup they are in series. The result is that the voltage across each coil in both hookups is 110 volts. In the series 220 hookup the same current flows in each coil because they are in series. In the parallel, 110 hookup, once again same current flows in each coil but twice that current flows in the parallel combination.

                        But there are no differences in current, voltage, heat, etc. in any single coil inside the motor.

                        As for Ed's statement, he is likely right because the double current had to flow in the wires between the electric pole and the motor. By Ohms law, the voltage drop in those lines is the I * R. The resistance is the same for the same size wire (most houses and commercial buildings use #12 for most common circuits) but the current is twice as much with the 110 volt hookup. So the voltage drop is twice as much. More power is lost in the wires leading to the motor. More important, less power is available at the motor so it can stall easier. Stall = more heat (in wires and in motor), more current, and tripped breaker.

                        Use 220 if possible. It is the better solution. That's why they have it in the first place.

                        Of course if we are talking about one Amp vs two, then the above may be moot.

                        Paul A.
                        </font>

                        I was referring to the wires feeding the
                        motor. duh! When those wires get hot, they
                        dissipate some power that the motor would
                        otherwize get. (lower voltage = motor stall
                        = burned up windings)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Wouldn't 220, being half the amperage, be easier on the switch contacts?

                          bc
                          BC

                          If ya wannit done your way ya gotta do it yourself.

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