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What a MESS!!!

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  • What a MESS!!!

    I served my community as fire chief for a few years back in the 70's and learned from that experience that a carefully planned program of fire prevention is much better than an aggressive program of fire suppression. As a result I have a dozen or so Kidde ABC fire extinguishers located around my shop.

    This morning I knocked one of them off its mounting on the side of my toolbox and the top broke off and if there is a better (worse) way of making a grand mess I have yet to discover it!! That #%& stuff is everywhere and it sticks to the bottoms of things as well as the top. I expect to still be cleaning it up next summer.

    So if you have fire extinguishers, and you should, make sure they are mounted securely.

    At least it wasn't a fire.

  • #2
    I have a two pound Halon in my basement shop. No mess. Too bad it can't be refilled.
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    • #3
      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
      I have a two pound Halon in my basement shop. No mess. Too bad it can't be refilled.</font>
      I run a halon fire suppression system in my race car. Why can't you refill your system?

      Wayne

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      • #4
        Since Halon is illegal to manufacture portable Halon extinguishers may not be refilled.
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        • #5
          Wayne, I run Halon supression in my car also. We can't get them refilled up here. Can you guys down there? I really don't ever want to use mine but with blown alky you just never know!
          Russ
          I have tools I don't even know I own...

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          • #6
            Last I heard there was still sufficient Halon to refill extinguisers for the immediate future. Has that changed?
            I have one in a formula car.

            But, there are several good alternatives to dry powder extinguishing agenst.

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            • #7
              I made up a few holders for fire extinguishers used on boats a while back using pvc pipe .
              The type of holder with the the stap around the extiguisher would let go with a good bang from a wave and the thing would then be loose-
              I got the appropriate sized pvc pipe -fitted a ply wood plug in for the bottom and screwed the lot to the bulk head ,extinguisher dropped in from the top.

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              • #8
                I had a similar experience, I had just arrived at the race track in North Carolina and was getting the motorcycle out of the van. Needless to say the van was stuffed with everything you need to race for a weekend and I tripped over something and in an attempt to not drop the bike I was pinned against the side of the van, unfortunately I landed on the fire extinguisher and set the darn thing off, now picture this...the back end of the van is open and all this white powder is gushing out the back I couldn't see a thing and everything in the van including me is getting covered in powder I can't see a thing finally I push the bike to the other side and roll out the back of the van coughing and hacking up white powder completely white from head to toe. By this time about ten other racers had converged at the back of the van to see the show, can anyone guess what ten motorcycle roadracers did to help their buddy who was in trouble...you guessed it one started to clap his hands and the rest fell to the ground laughing. What a great bunch of guys!!!!
                (Just when you think life can't get any worse the EX Wife says "well that was pretty stupid don't you think?") Thats why divorce costs so much... because it's worth it!!!!

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                • #9
                  Halon is still available. But, at least in Canada it is restricted to uses where there are no reaasonable alternatives such as aircraft engine fire suppression systems. Also, the price will make your eyes water. The current going price in the US for pure Halon is around $75 to $80 per pound. Halon is highly restricted under the Montreal Protocol.
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                  • #10
                    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by torker:
                    Wayne, I run Halon supression in my car also. We can't get them refilled up here. Can you guys down there? I really don't ever want to use mine but with blown alky you just never know!
                    Russ
                    </font>
                    While I have not had to have mine refilled yet, I do know of others that have had theirs done with little problem. Having said that, I must admit that the sanctioning body I road race with has been "encouraging" us to move away from halon.

                    I didn't realize you guys were in BC until I checked the profiles. That makes sense as I sometimes get hassled when I cross the boarder heading toward mission.

                    The border guys occasionally give me some grief about the halon bottle. They also seem to take note of the large NRA stickers on the side of the car...

                    Wayne

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                    • #11
                      What are you racing wayne?

                      Rob

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                      • #12
                        Joel knows more about this,but I suspect the Halon ain't actual Halon anymore.

                        I have had opertunity to use several of the newer dry exstigushers,none worked any better than a garden hose,which was what I resorted to after they failed.Absolutely none worked better than c02.

                        And yes the yellow and white crap stuck to everything,particularly carbuerators.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          While the manufacturing of Halon was banned in 1994, Halon was stockpiled and is being reclaimed and recycled. There are 2 types of Halon, both are CFCs; Halon 1211 (discharges as a liquid), or Halon 1301 (gaseous), and they are indeed generally rechargeable, at least here in the states.

                          There are some extinguishers made with the newer ozone friendly “Halotronâ€‌, but I know little about them. I would think that if they were really effective and practical, we would probably all already be using them. If anyone knows anything about them, please post.

                          In addition to having the amazing ability to ensure that every square millimeter of surface area in your shop has seen at least some deposit of tiny white particles, dry chemical extinguishers are rather corrosive to electronics. On the other hand, they are quite effective on most types of fires and affordable enough for everyone to have several interspersed around the house and shop (you DO don’t you?). Co2 is a lot cleaner and works great, but they are only recommended for B&C fires (B- flammable liquids and gasses, C- energized electrical equipment). It is best to have both types on hand if possible.

                          Good luck with the clean up Randolph.

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                          • #14
                            I was welding on a leaking hydraulic tank on a $500,000 garbage truck, it cought fire and burned up the air-brake lines for a few seconds, we sprayed the powder crap everwhere .it made a massive mess, the water pisser was the one that did the best and the powder made the mess.

                            the truck was a rapid rail garbage truck, it goes 4x4 on the dump every day , but is a high dollar unit.(cameras in the rear and the works)

                            I know about fire fighting, its not funny at all.

                            the best small fire killer is a blast from an air hose, It's save a few folks from big time nightmares in the shop.

                            this is a nice link,

                            4.0 Fire Safety.

                            4.1 Fire Extinguishers. Fire extinguishers shall be suitable for the three classes of fires common to machine shops:

                            Class A Combustibles (paper, wood, cardboard)
                            Class B Liquid fuels (solvents, oil-based paints, gasoline)
                            Class C Electrical fires
                            Class D extinguishers for flammable metals shall be supplied if determined appropriate by the Fire Prevention authority.

                            4.2 Storage and Use of Flammable Liquids. Flammable liquids shall be managed in accordance with the University of Guelph policy Flammable, Combustible, and Pyrophoric Materials.

                            4.3 Oily Rags. Oily rags shall be kept in approved waste containers. Such containers shall be emptied daily.

                            http://www.uoguelph.ca/hr/ehs/machine.htm


                            [This message has been edited by tattoomike68 (edited 11-27-2004).]

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                            • #15
                              Just install an AFFF dispenser. No worries. JRouche
                              My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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