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Doing Radius on O-1

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  • Doing Radius on O-1

    I have to put some radius's on O-1. A mild curve is all I need, but I need to know a formula for speed and distance. Any one have something to determine the rate of sped verses the rate of travel? The O-1 is not hardened, the curve is only 1/4" radius.


    Thanks,

    Jerry

  • #2
    I think I need more info to understand what you are asking. Are you grinding the shape? what is it about rate of speed VS rate of travel? Is it a corner rounding end mill?

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    • #3
      I am using a corner rounding end mill to do this radius.

      It looks like:

      http://anvilsandinkstudios.com/corne...ingendmill.jpg

      I need to know what speed I should use to make this.

      This a learning thing, as well as making a new hammer plate for my power hammer.

      Jerry

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      • #4
        Machinery's Handbook should have the recommended surface speed for O-1 (70 sfpm?), but you might want to back off on that a bit. I may be wrong but would calaculate the rpm using 60 sfpm and a 1/2" diameter (for the 1/4" radiused cut).

        Mike
        Mike Henry near Chicago

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        • #5
          The finish you get with this type of radius tool is usually on the rough side, crank your speed up on the final very light cut with slow feed for a smooth finish.

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          • #6
            "This a learning thing, as well as making a new hammer plate for my power hammer."


            How about some pics of your power hammer?

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            • #7
              Here is my power hammer and the smith who built it for me.

              The hammer is now in a wooden box with 250 pounds of sand to deaden the vibrations. I am doing a few more mods to it, just haven't had the time to do them.

              http://anvilsandinkstudios.com/airhammer.html

              Jerry

              [This message has been edited by jfsmith (edited 11-28-2004).]

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              • #8
                Okay, I think I see how it works. The cylinder raises the weight. The hammering action is by the weight plus a boost from the air cylinder? How heavy is the weight?

                What I don't quite understand is with those fairly small air lines how can you get enough flow to run the thing rapidly? Seems like the smallish cylinder exhaust line might even slow it down?

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                • #9
                  <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">crank your speed up on the final very light cut with slow feed for a smooth finish.
                  </font>

                  wouldn't doing this prematurely dull the cutter over time as it would do more rubbing than cutting?

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                  • #10
                    Dr.

                    Try this website:

                    http://www.geocities.com/zoellerforge/hammer.html

                    Mine can go really fast, the air lines on the valves are rated as good as the normal compressor hoses. When I run fast, it's at 125psi.

                    The purpose is to strike the surface, not compress the billet into nothingness.


                    Jerry

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                    • #11
                      Derek wrote;
                      "wouldn't doing this prematurely dull the cutter over time as it would do more rubbing than cutting?"

                      Not really, I am talking about going from 250 rpm to say 400 rpm on the final cut. My radius cutter in the size mentioned by Jerry is over 20 years old and still going strong, it’s not used very often mind you.

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                      • #12
                        Al,

                        That is what I want to know 400 rpm is ve3ry do able.


                        Many thanks to all,

                        Jerry

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                        • #13
                          If you want a very fine finish on the job from the radius cutter, use about 400/600 revs and you CLIMB MILL with the cutter, taking off maybe 0.001" to 0.002"thou on the LAST cut. Use a slow feed rate when climb milling so NO grabbing the job and stuffing things up. Use care and your brains and you will get a NICE finish every time.

                          radish

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