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A new life for old metal

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  • A new life for old metal

    I am driving my wife to despair, buying 'stuff' for my workshop; we were at an auction last week , no tools or machinery, but at the back looking forlorn and slightly worse for wear was this jerry-built lathe. 'Mmmmm' says I, maybe that is my indexer I am planning to build. There was nothing else of interest there so I left an absentee bid and headed home.
    Are there any suggestions out there of the ways it can be modified.
    The centre height is 100mm, h/stock is 300mm o/s and 180mm i/s, the t/stock is 210mm , the wee chuck is 80mm and the jaws open up to 50mm; of course it is pre metric but my tape isn't
    I am thinking of using it complete on a sub plate or reversing the headstock arrangement to accomodated a centre and the chuck, or a mandrel set up with the indexing disc located outboard .
    Does anyone recognise this small part of engineering history ??
    Here are some images for your perusal(??).


    Is my wife correct, am I just a sad case who surrounds himself with junk If so, who or what needs to go first
    What do you think???
    Seasons Greetings to all, Ken

    [This message has been edited by speedy (edited 12-03-2004).]

    [This message has been edited by speedy (edited 12-05-2004).]
    Ken.

  • #2
    I think a local school has one of those set up, but with a longer "bed" and uses it for wood turning. works good to.


    Samuel

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    • #3
      Do you like the well balnced mix of timber and steel used in its' construction??
      This lathe also came with the support bracket for the rest, maybe I will find a use for that also.
      Ken.

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      • #4
        the garden lathe ,lol. I love it

        you can make anything you want from it.

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        • #5
          Wow, an old gap bed lathe! I wonder if the insert still fits?
          What could be better than being in the garden and pursuing the metal hobby at the same time. Hey, I bet you could use that to peel carrots and potatoes. You could also roast a turkey on it if you set the bed on fire. Looks like there's room for about a 5 or 6 pounder to be turned. Ya might have to make up a 'back gear' to slow it down enough.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            So!, the gap is missing aye?, it was sold as complete and in good working trim, was I stitched up??
            So the consensus is to utilise it as the backyard garden rottiserie, complete with variable speed treadle .
            What concerns me is the potential loss of the bed from combustion and the size chicken that can be 'swung' in this rottiserie. I could fan force flame grill from overhead though?? ( damn, more work !)
            Ken
            Ken.

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            • #7
              You need to get the chuck key out before someone gets hurt. lol

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              • #8
                It would be a great old tool to see in new paint and in working order. The headstock bearings might be fine even after all these years. Look at some of Alistairs machines. Now if you don't have the space, just pass it up. It is a "Pig in a Poke" and the kind of thing you might put a $20 bid on and just walk away and hope you don't win. On the otherhand, once you get it turning you can easily burnish off the rust on the turning parts and paint the rest and be happy to own it and use it once a year or so for those tool post grinding jobs you wouldn't do on your other lathe. I'm sure most of us have collected worse. You might just be the only one crazy enough to bid on it!

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                • #9
                  Hey Darryl, you can see that the lathe also has a second gap, note the 1/2 joint, ha ha.
                  There are no identifying marks to be seen anywhere. Is the lathe recognisable to anyone??
                  And the OSH prize for safety goes to Mochinist for noting my flagrant disregard for workshop safety The prize is two weeks in an iron cage of your choice to protect yourself from yourself and others in the work environment.
                  The sad thing is I possibly was the only bidder ( I shall ask Les ) at $50 NZ, it had a $60 reserve .Hey, it also has a small 1/4 hp motor that might work
                  The headstock bush is fine and the tailstock, although rusty, feels good also The rust will disappear when boiled in TSP then treated by electrolysis, Yeeha!!as new steel.
                  Now I'm enjoying the piss takes but does anyone have suggestions for the indexer idea??
                  Seasons Greetings, Ken

                  [This message has been edited by speedy (edited 12-04-2004).]
                  Ken.

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                  • #10
                    Given up on the Myford then?

                    Allan

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                    • #11
                      Hey, I bet you could use that to peel carrots and potatoes. You could also roast a turkey on it if you set the bed on fire

                      Thanks. That's the hardest I've laughed in a few days now

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                      • #12
                        Your'e all so cruel!!
                        If it had been an Asian lathe it would have stayed put at the auction( do Asian lathes last as long??)
                        I like to consider that I have rescued a piece of engineering history of tremendous significance from the crap heap
                        The Myford has given up on me and is packed away till after the house is painted ,also
                        I have been told by a higher authority that I am not to buy any more machinery LOL... yeah right!!
                        cheers Ken

                        [This message has been edited by speedy (edited 12-04-2004).]
                        Ken.

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                        • #13
                          Speedy this will make a nice little woodworking lathe which, I am sure it was designed for.If you clean it up(which will ba a pleasurable occupation of your time) I am sure it will be a nice little worker. Never mind what anyone says the headstock and tailstock both look well made and strong when this is done up comments will be very different,I would replace the wood to your own dimensions good luck and keep buying .Alistair
                          Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                          • #14
                            I meant to say that is or was not the original length of it if you look at the picture of the right hand side behind the tailsock you will see the wood has been cut shorter recently,and a small block added to bring it up to bench workable height.you could keep it this length or make it slightly longer if you wish will make spindles and bowls etc nicely Alistair
                            Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                            • #15
                              My son has a relative of this lathe in his basement and uses it for wood turning.Got some big bucks for turning 4 copies of an old porch post for an architech.The posts were 8 1/2ft long. 1/2ft longer than anyone elses fancy lathes!! His is mounted on two 2-1/2inch by 10 inch oak timbers,12 feet long.Don't think there's any name on his either. He uses an old 1/2hp motor.

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