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Machining tonight

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  • Machining tonight

    I'm working making parts for my CNC mill. I thought I would show how a lathe can build a mill, in part. I did show some of this before but this has a few extra touches.

    In this pic I am squaring up a couple of 1/4" aluminum plates by fly cutting them with the lathe. They are about 6" by 8" and I am machining both at once. The compound on the SB9 has been removed and a 1 1/2" steel block has been bolted in place with an aluminum fence to clamp the parts to.

    The fence has been aligned to about ~.0002 per foot, basically no movement of the dial guage (the fence extends about a foot to the right of the pic). I want these parts as square as possible. I spent a lot of time aligning this because the fly cutter is cutting on the front swing down and the back swing up. This way I can get almost eight inches of cut from a 4.5" travel. The cut at the back needs to line up with the cut at the front when it meets. It does, within a tenth or so.

    I am using my power crossfeed that I made using a barbeque rotisserie motor and a mag clutch. Because the cutter is cutting on both sides it took me a while to figure out how to sharpen it. I have it pretty good and it works well, excellent finish. The cutter is mounted in a 1" x 1" steel bar stock block held in the 6" four jaw.

    Another item in this pic is how I can cut these plates without any chatter. Clamped to the plates are a couple of blocks of lead. This dampens any vibrations completely by increasing the mass and lowering the resonant frequency a lot. The cut is very clean. So far it is working very well. I am making good progress but the mill will not be done until much later next year. I do have a tendency to get a bit carried a way. So be it.

    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

  • #2
    Evan...you are one patient man! I like the flycutter idea. BTW...how do you hold the cutters in the bar? Is it a round hole with a setscrew pressing it back or a little more sophisticated?
    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

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    • #3
      Very good Evan think the lead idea is the tops , will remember that one ..thanks
      All the best....mark

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      • #4
        Yep, just a 1/4 x 20 set screw in the end of the bar.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          Thanks for sharing Evan.

          Now this is what makes this Home shop machinists forum worth it's weight in gold.

          Posts like this is what this is all about

          "EDUCATION"

          Please keep the updates of your projects coming. Great stuff to learn...

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          • #6
            Ha...Evan showed us the lead trick before. I use it a lot now. Have a chunk that I put on the end of my boring bar. I also clamp a couple pieces to plates that I square up in the mill that are sticking up too far. I just make them out of wheel weights...melt them in an old cast iron pot...use the wifes lil' garden rake to pull off the clips and crap and pour into a mold. Funny how lead will dampen vibrations more than steel.
            I have tools I don't even know I own...

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            • #7
              Yep, I have showed it before. There are a lot of new people on the board and stuff like this bears repeating. I have noticed a distinct lack lately of plain old machining project posts so I thought I would put one up.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                Really...good call Evan! It still amazes me, the things that you do on that ol'SB. That's why I get a little cranky with the newbies that think gear head, dro,cnc,blah,blah is what it is all about! Basic machining principals are the real depth of machining...even if we chose to ignore it sometimes.
                I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                • #9
                  Neat! Thanks for posting, Evan. I'm going to try the lead weight trick on my Myford. One thing that I learned recently when milling on my lathe is to screw the 9" faceplate onto the spindle nose so that it adds mass/inertia as I'm milling. It made a world of difference and I believe Forrest Addy had mentioned in a post that mass is everything when it comes to milling.

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