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Noting a Higbee on a blueprint

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  • Noting a Higbee on a blueprint

    What is the typical accepted way to specify a Higbee on a blueprint? Is a simple note stating "Higbee on start thread" acceptable? I would like all of my prints to be as universally understandable as possible as I am currently being forced to sub out work.

    For those of you wondering, a Higbee is cutting back the start of a thread, generally with a small diameter rotary cut, until a full profile thread is reached. They help prevent cross threading and are tolerant when connecting with dirty threads. Higbee’s are generally found on fire hoses.


  • #2
    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Joel:

    For those of you wondering, a Higbee is cutting back the start of a thread, generally with a small diameter rotary cut, until a full profile thread is reached. They help prevent cross threading and are tolerant when connecting with dirty threads. Higbee’s are generally found on fire hoses.
    </font>
    Easy,just put the above on the print I know what a Higbee end is and I even thought you had gone English for a second there Sounds like something one of Alistair's soccer houligan friends would say

    I just need one more tool,just one!

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    • #3
      Aye, you don’t ave to get bloody insulting there ya big lassie.

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      • #4
        Higbee, oh, ok. Thought ye mighta meant the Hibees fer a minute there
        Hibs aka Hibernian FC, mortal enemies of Hearts.

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        • #5
          Weren't the Higbee's locked in a long standing feud with the McCoys?


          Oh, my bad.....that's the Hatfields.

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          • #6
            Safest way is to define the feature on the drawing unless there is a specification that defines the feature then call out the spec.

            ------------------
            Neil Peters
            Neil Peters

            When on the hunt, a broken part is better than no part at all.

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