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Where is the best place to buy bearings on the net?

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  • Robert Jones
    replied
    Jim, as i said in an earlier post, I had dealings with awbearings. I ordered through phone calls and e-mail. There was a mis-communication and I got a set of bearings that were wrong, another phone call and they accepted the return and sent me the correct part all within a couple of days. Their prices were good and the service was good. The little glitch was my fault. If I need bearings in the future, I'll deal with them again, Bobby

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  • Jake
    replied
    Rich,

    You are exactly correct!

    The original question got sidetracked to suppliers by some people, but here is an explanation of why I asked where to buy bearings on the internet (please read original question).

    I live in a small town and there are only two companies that supply bearings here - and one is strickly wholesale. Since I do not buy a lot of bearings, the retail company doesn't really want to go out of their way for me. They quoted me a price for the bearings I wanted for approximately $560.00. Other retail companies that are around 400 miles away from me quoted a prices ranging from $295.00 to $308.00. And this is for the exact same bearings! So you can see the local company couldn't care less about my business. The six month delay was just talk. The owner of this company is happy to sell me anything he has in stock for reasonable prices but special orders ....... It's his company and he can run it anyway he pleases!

    I called Timken and they said that the bearings I needed were in stock and that I should be able to get them between four and ten days. Even overnight if I wanted!

    Since I had to purchase these bearings from people I haven't done business with I thought I'd check with the group to see if any of them bought bearings over the internet. If the companies they suggested sounded good maybe the price could be beat and I could save an additional 7.75 percent by not having to pay state and local taxes.
    Just practicing free-enterprise.

    Anyway, I knew the above information before I asked my question about the internet to the group but I did not think I had to explain every little detail nor did I think that it would be an attack on local suppliers.

    Rich, thanks for your explantion and also to those who provided me with the names of companies on the internet.


    -Jim

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  • Rich Carlstedt
    replied
    Time Out Guys !
    Don't confuse ball bearings classifications with tapered roller bearings !
    With ball bearings, you have classes 1,3,5,7,9,with 9 being the best and in that ascending order !
    With Timken "tapered roller" bearings, you have 4,2,3,0,00, with 00 being the best and in that order
    With Timken "tapered roller" METRIC bearings,
    you have K,N,C,B classes with "B" being the best.

    A class 3 Timken is a better than average bearing and if ordered as a "matched set", as most precision bearings should be,it may take some time.

    If you can't wait, you may ask if the cones and cups will be marked (copper [email protected] high point)and get seperate cups and cones and still be class 3, but probably not as good as a matched set...but far better than a class 2

    Most "world class" bearing houses can search and find them somewhere.....

    For what it's worth :
    Ball bearings were invented in Europe, so most of them are Metric in size.
    Roller bearings were invented in the States and so are mostly inch sizes !

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  • Thrud
    replied
    Agreed. I would say more onus is falling on the merchants to insure the consumer gets the right product. Caveat Emptor - nay, say I, nay - Caveat Venditor (Seller beware) and scientia potentia (knowledge is power)

    Any mispelled Latin I blame on the Jacobs 18N that keeps getting in my way - bad chuck!

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  • docsteve66
    replied
    There is little need to accept BS from any one. That includes Doctor, Lawyer, Merchant, chief. Too many very fine books, catalogs etc. And with the advent of the net?

    Dig it out!!! Crevat Emptor!! (I need to dig out a spelling book- but I dont hunt up specs on cheap parts either)

    Leave a comment:


  • JCHannum
    replied
    I have dealt with a lot of bearing houses and power transmission suppliers in the last 40 years or so. Most have excellent backup technical support. The sorry state of the economy is putting well trained, knowledgeable people into these positions.
    The guy behind the counter may not always be the sharpest knife in the drawer, but he can usually pass you on to someone else. Just ask.

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  • Oso
    replied
    Then you are in good shape. A lot of the suppliers here don't know how to spell "engineer".

    Doesn't mean you can't get good service, just that you are likely to get the runaround on something "special" like a higher class of bearing. I suspect the part about "substitutions" is a result of personal experience!

    Always best to assess the competence (and interest) of a supplier before taking their advice about something which is of high importance to you , but no consequence to them. People's interest in making sure to give the best advice depends on their degree of "buy-in" to the problem, as well as their capabilities and understanding............

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  • Thrud
    replied
    Oso:

    I think the level of competence here in Canada is outstanding. The places I have dealt with are exceptionally well trained by the parent company (Koyo, SKF, Timkin, etc.) and most are professional engineers - a pleasure to deal with. Their knowledge of bearings, and how to care and feed them, and proper installation method required for specific bearings is outstanding.

    They also stand behind their products 100% Something that is sorely lacking from most places these days. I must give credit where it is well deserved...

    [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 07-04-2002).]

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  • Oso
    replied
    AS far as the "local idiots", That was nearly a quote from comments on the Chaski board, but it accurately describes a number of places I have dealt with.

    Following was posted by Forrest Addy, who has forgotten more about bearings than most folks will ever know.

    "When it comes to spindle bearings and precision grade bearing do not go to a bearing supply house and expect knowledgeable support. You'll be lucky or you have to educate them. Once in a very great while I'll need a precision grade bearing. If there's any doubt about the local outfit's ability to get me what I want, I look in Thomas Register for manufacturer's phone numbers. I try to order direct after consulting with their precision bearing department and settling on details. If they have an exclusive arrangement with a local supplier, fine. Let the order be processed through them as a strict paper shuffle. Just don't let the local guy make any substitutions to "...save you a few bucks." "


    [This message has been edited by Oso (edited 07-03-2002).]

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  • Thrud
    replied
    Speaking of bearings, I read a neat story about a double cup two cone bearing (EE325286DW-C2) made by Koyo. It was in an Ipsco 2HI 48" rolling mill in Regina, SK. The mill crashed (the roll broke in two) and the bearing survived. That would not be that big a deal except it was first installed in 1969 and overhauled in may 1991, the crash was in 1998. The bearing is still going - rolling 250,000 tons of steel per year.

    Want to pull a Bart Simpson? Phone the bearing house and tell them you need a price for two for your "big lathe". I are such a stinker...

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  • mbensema
    replied
    I did a check of internet bearing suppliers including AW Bearing and found they were about 30% higher then my local dealer for the bearings I need for my customers. Don't know if the same would hold true for lathe bearings, but I would prefer to deal with a local guy who is going to help me when I have questions and I can run over to the store to look at something if I need to.
    If the first one tells you 6 months, go to one that will do the leg work to get it for you in a couple days.

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  • docsteve66
    replied
    Sorry- I deleted my comments. Dave said it nicer than I.
    Steve

    [This message has been edited by docsteve66 (edited 07-02-2002).]

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  • Thrud
    replied
    Oso:

    It would not be fair to call all of them "Local Idiots" - the majority of bearing suppliers here in Edmonton have people with Engineering degrees selling the product. Maybe this is a local anomaly as there is lots of heavy oil field activity including the two Tar Sands projects in Ft. McMurray. We also have Lumber and Paper mills and the National Nano-Technology Center is being built here in Edmonton. The guys I talk to really have their **** together.

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  • Oso
    replied
    On other boards it has been mentioned that if you get the exact identifying numbers from the manufacturer, and basically just use the local idiots for collecting money and receiving the shipment you do much better.
    Most bearing houses look it up in a book and then give you a blank look if they don't see it. Anything except what they have in stock "is a special and will take a long time".

    Leave a comment:


  • abn
    replied
    You could always try McMaster Carr...they'll order most anything if they don't have it

    www.mcmaster.com

    My local supplier is Bearings and Drives, they are not on the net that I know of but they will ship...they're at (626)443-0251 or fax for a quote at (626)443-3438

    You could also call Timken and and ask for a list of nationwide or major distributors in an area one shipping zone away from you so UPS ground would be cheap and essentially overnight.

    Leave a comment:

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