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  • ot-Glue question

    I am in the process of refurbishing my camera, and I've gotten to the light metering system. One of the light meters is glued to a glass optical block, which is glued to the prism of the camera for the viewfinder. However after 30 something years the glue has wasted away, and I need to reglue the glass block to the prism.
    Which glue should I use? I was thinking Cyano crylate or 5 minute epoxy. I have the epoxy now, but need to wait til tommorow to get the cyano.
    Im not too concerned about needing to recalibrate the light metering system since I need to do that anyhow.

  • #2
    Bill I am not sure but would think that it would take a special glue. I glued some glass into a tube with some epoxy and after a time it broke loose. I believe the problem was the different temp. expansion ratio of the glass and metal.
    Charlie
    Don\'t ask me to do a dam thing, I\'m retired.
    http://home.earthlink.net/~kcprecision/

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    • #3
      Be extremely careful to ensure everything is absolutely clean, especially of fingerprints if you use cyano-acrylate glue. It gives off fumes that will react with any organic material in the vicinity such as fingerprints and will turn them a very visible white which cannot be removed. Clean all surfaces with ethyl alcohol and a cotton ball (real cotton, not synthetic). If you are doing this with the components in the camera then don't use cyano-acrylate glue.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        Thank you, I used a white type of glue, like elmers but different. It was a moot point, as I had the top cover removed from my camera, the rope and pulley system for the lollipop indicator for use with the light meter popped out, springs undone, and chaos ensured.
        I would have an easier time rebuilding a car engine than I would figuring this thing out without a service manual.
        So Its all back together, all the light seals replaced, and now its a 100% pure MANUAL camera. I have a sick feeling in my gut,but atleast it wasn't a nikon or canon I messed up.

        [This message has been edited by BillH (edited 12-13-2004).]

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        • #5
          Look on the bright side, 100% manual SLR is perfect for astrophotography.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            I was going to suggest Rear View Mirror adhesive but it sounds like you have it under control.

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            • #7
              I was going to suggest a camera repair shop! Oh well!

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              • #8
                Dave, your suggestion is still valid, lol.
                Hey, comming from this group of people, arent we all Do it yourselfers? Just the way I am. I'd sooner track down a service manual and figure it out myself. Thats how I learned to fix and build computers, got sick of being at the mercy of some one else.

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                • #9
                  Yeam which is why I refrained from saying anything, but cameras are one of the few things I know to leave to the pros. But thats experience talking too.

                  Dave

                  "Experience is an unusual teacher in that it gives the test first and the lesson after."

                  "While experience teaches fools, it does not necessarily follow that the fools are getting any wiser."

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                  • #10
                    You can buy optical glues from Loctite or from optical suppliers like Edmund Optical http://www.edmundoptics.com/ the optical grade glues are special and do not obstruct light transmission like most adhesives would. Cyanoacrylates will not work and will degrade from moisture in the air.

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                    • #11
                      There is some good information about 1/2 way down this page:

                      http://www.laserfaq.com/slf/laserclp.htm

                      "Experience isn’t the best teacher, only the most memorable"
                      Location: North Central Texas

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                      • #12
                        Laserfag OOPS!Thats laserfaq

                        [This message has been edited by wierdscience (edited 12-14-2004).]
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          Microscope lenes and other compound lenses used to be put together with something called Canada Balsam, which is just what it sounds like. Might be available from a lab supply house. In use, it was applied sparingly and the pieces wrung together. If there were no bubbles, the glass assembly was put back in its housing and you were done. If there was a bubble, it was slipped apart recleaned and tried again. It's gooey stuff and the process isn't hard at all.
                          George

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