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Inherited Tools - Photos

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  • Inherited Tools - Photos

    Hi guys,

    My grandpa was a machinist and my dad just sent me all his old machinist tools.. I bought an enco 3 in 1 machine about six months ago and am very new to using any of these tools..

    They look very old, but very high quality.. Anyone have any insight as to the age of them? Most are starrett.. One has a patent from the 1890's stamped into it..














    Thanks,

    Mike

  • #2
    That is a real treasure trove of tools. Wow. Many of the Starrett designs were manufactured with virtually no changes for many years, such as the 12" tri square you have. I have the same one in 12" and 6". I think they still make that design.

    What really suprises me is the tachometer. I have the exact same tachometer.

    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      What a tremendous inheritance Mike, use them well and give them the respect they deserve, cherish and maintain them well.
      Ken
      Ken.

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      • #4
        Wow, what are the chances of that evan? Do you use it often?

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        • #5
          I second the remarks of Evan and Speedy. Those are more than just tools, they're a legacy. Don't be afraid to put them to use. By the looks of it, you have at hand now the necessities for meeting most your needs. I would especially second Speedy's remarks about giving those tools the respect they deserve. I inherited several very nice tools from my father when he passed on - many Starrett and some Mitutuyo. Among those tools were some Starretts my father had inherited from his father, including a combination square made in the late 1800's.

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          • #6
            Yes thats very, very nice. Lovely

            ------------------
            Gene
            Gene

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            • #7
              Mike,

              I have used the tach occasionally and it is very accurate. For the most part it is really a collectors item. It is quite a coincidence that you have one too as they seem to be quite rare. I have not been able to find anything about it or like it on the net.

              The most unusual thing about it for a mechanical tach is that it reads up to 12,000 rpm.

              [This message has been edited by Evan (edited 12-15-2004).]
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eB...category=42606

                If intersted in the tach, someone has one on ebay right now..

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                • #9
                  I would guess mid 30's to mid 40's. I have a Starrett Catalog from 1938 that shows the leatherette cases and the fancier style of casting on the square. Many of the Starrett tools are the same today, and have had the same catalog number for over 100 years.

                  As far as I know, Jones Motrola is still in business. A very similar Jones Motrola tachometer was available from McMaster Carr a couple of years ago. They were quite a step up from the mechanical revolution counter most machinists had.

                  The nicest thing about these tools is the link to your grandfather, they still work, and measure the same as they did for him. I have some of my grandfather's tools, and use them in his memory. Many of my other tools came from estate sales or auctions, and I was fortunate to meet the previous owners. These tools are more important to me than any new tool that could replace them.
                  Jim H.

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                  • #10
                    That's a fine collection of valuable tools. I just hope they don't end up on ebay.

                    By the way, if that's San Marcos, Texas - Hi Neighbor!

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                    • #11
                      Dont worry about these ending up on ebay, they are part of my history and will be passed on to the next generation! I just wanted to see if anyone could id them age wise..

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                      • #12
                        You are lucky. That's a fine collection.

                        Ditto on Speedy's comments.

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                        • #13
                          What a wonderful legacy to receive. I wish I had some of my Grandfather's tools to remember him by.

                          On a side note, in that first pic, there's several "fish tails" used for setting up and checking threading tools. I have to get me one of them.

                          John

                          ------------------
                          Pursue Excellence and the rest will follow.
                          Pursue Excellence and the rest will follow.

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                          • #14
                            Mike,
                            That's a terrific collection you inherited! I have some of my Dad's tools which look to be the same vintage as yours. He working in the late 1930's. One piece that really caught my eye was the drill point gage in the envelope marked National in the first photo. I have my Dad's too. Very handy checking drill points. What I really treasure is when he drops by while I'm working and using his old tools. This never fails to bring out some story about a job, a co-worker, or how the tool was acquired and at what cost. I just kick back and listen, even if I heard it countless times before. There will be plenty of time to get the job done... I just hope one of my kids picks up the bug.
                            Enjoy,
                            Bob

                            [This message has been edited by Bob-O (edited 12-15-2004).]

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                            • #15
                              That is a wonderful collection of tools, what a great legacy to leave for a son and grandson From the sound of it Metal
                              chips must get in the blood and alter the genetics. How many of us had fathers and grandfathers that worked with and loved heavy metal.

                              I also have my father's old tools. Yes they are valuable but more than valuable they are priceless. Every time I pick one up to use it brings back memories of all the good times we had together. Then I stop to wonder and think about what he worked on. B29's, and the Enola Gay was only one of the
                              many that he helped to construct.

                              Ross
                              GUNS Don't kill people
                              Drivers using cell phones do.

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