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making hammers + other stuff

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Thanks Thrud. The bodyman in question did indeed appreciate it. Liked the heavier-than-usual heft, and I put a better polish on the faces than any of his high-dollar commercial hammers could ever hope for.

    It won't stay polished, of course, but the bodyman isn't the type trying to make perfectly smooth, non-bondo, no-filler invisible seams either. It's mostly straight repair/insurance work and a bit of custom work.

    For regular hammers, I've gotten a handful of ball-peens of various sizes from the local pawn shops for around a dollar apiece. Pop on a new $4 handle from the hardware store and sand off the oogies on the face, and you have a nice $5 hammer.

    Doc.

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  • Thrud
    replied
    Very nice hammer Doc - good polish on the faces - hope the lucky slob that got it appreciates the effort - I know I would...

    Nice Hammers George.

    I have about 40 hammers right now - I think I need some more. Good hammers are a bitch to find these days - so are hickory handles for that matter.

    One of the handiest hammers I have is a Nupla with interchangable faces - I turn Pure Aluminum (dead soft) and bronze faces for it along with plastic as I need them. I have not made lead faces yet, put I plan on making a mold for it. I use copper hammers quite a bit - mostly on copper assemblies (don't ask) - I turn the heads as required.

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Just made a hammer over Christmas as a gift.

    (Link to post.)

    I drilled it, then used an endmill to turn the round hole into an oval. After that, I just clamped the head in the vise longways (gripping the faces of the hammer) and tilted it sideways a bit (pure eyeball, that-looks-bout-right) and milled the edges of the oval into a slight taper.

    Then I clamped it in the vise t'other way and again just tilted it by eyeball and milled the ends of the oval into a taper.

    It was rough, ugly and nasty, but I cleaned it up into a reasonably smooth hourglass shape with a rat-tail file. Didn't take long.

    Then I set the handle in with epoxy and the wedges. I doubt it'll ever come out.

    Doc.

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  • Eric Nelson
    replied
    I use these all the time. Both Rawhide Mallets and Rawhide Hammers as well as the Copper Mallet and Copper Hammers.

    McMaster-Carr, MSC, and ORS Nasco carry them. J&L sell them online at Amazon as well.

    http://www.garlandmfg.com/mallets/products.html

    ------------------
    ERN

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  • ibewgypsie
    replied
    Mount a index table on your lathe for a real simple ball-maker...

    Works, I can post a pic when I get a chance to take some...

    David

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  • Derek13
    replied
    And how do you secure it? Just a snug press fit? Also how do you make the ball end of the ball peen hammer? I'm interested in making one of those as well

    Also i havn't machined much (well any really) copper... What are the general 'rules' for machining it the best? Is it much like aluminum or more towards steel? Or a different method all together?

    [This message has been edited by Derek13 (edited 05-25-2004).]

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  • G.A. Ewen
    replied
    Derek,
    I bought the handles before drilling and milling the hammer heads. Just measured the handles and made the holes for them smaller so that I had to file the handles to the right size with a rasp.

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  • Derek13
    replied
    G.A Those hammers look great! i'm curious though how to get the handle to fit nice and tight into the head of the hammer? I'm very interested in making a copper, or brass hammer with a wood handle simliar to yours. I know you said to drill it out then widen with endmill... but how do you get a nice snug fit?

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  • coles-webb
    replied
    Wait for the next storm and blame the storm and then "offer" to clean up the mess and cart away the debris for her!!!

    Mike

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  • sandman2234
    replied
    I wonder what my Mother-in-law would say if she found out I cut down her Crepe Myrtle to make a hammer handle?
    David from jax

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  • lynnl
    replied
    The subject of hammer handles is near and dear to my heart. And my favorite by far are the octagonal hickory handles. They just feel soooo good in the hand! One of the simple, but great joys of life is holding a hammer handle, sweat-burnished by years of use.

    On a similar note, I like to make my own handles for files and such. And I've found that the wood from Crepe Myrtle is superb for that purpose. It's incredibly hard and dense grained. Almost as hard as dogwood. It has a nice, subtle pinkish color. Don't know if that's used as an ornamental shrub in the northern climates, but it's very common here in the south.

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  • G.A. Ewen
    replied
    I made these hammers 3 of 4 years ago. Drilled a hole in the center and then made it oval with an endmill. I purposely left them without any taper thinking that by the time the heads became lose it would be time to re-face them. They have not come lose yet . So much for well made plans .

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  • ibewgypsie
    replied
    Brass faces, UHMW faces, brass cone hammer (stretching) Leather bags with sand in them.
    My 6 feet of railroad iron, my steel table, my wooden forms..

    A torch bottle cap makes a good beater to rough shape sheet metal with. Just weld a pipe to it.

    I love hammers. It is a good way to relieve frustrations, beat the crap outa it. My English wheel can not fix the mess I make sometimes. I quietly throw them pieces away.

    David

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  • moldmonkey
    replied
    If you want to spend the extra money you can buy a replacement Nupla fiberglass handle from MSC. They are great looking and are epoxied in. Imade a nice BFH from some 2" brass hex and a short Nupla slugging hammer handle. I have also made lots of steel hammer handles,put on a nice knurl, a piece of brass in the end, round it off. The brass is pretty and is nice for light taps.
    Never can have too many hammers.

    Jon

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  • x39
    replied
    Do it in a lathe. Hold the part on a face plate, determine the offset, drill and bore one side of the taper using the compound rest. Then turn the part end for end on the face plate, so it turns on the on the centerline of the next offest, and bore away. There will be a slight scallop where the two cuts meet, this can be removed by centering the part and taking another cut, or by using a Dremel. I hope this description makes sense to you, I've used this method many times with good results.

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