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Silver soldering+ Parkerizing

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  • Silver soldering+ Parkerizing

    A friend has a Colt 1911. It is the Parkerized model. The front sight has been replaced with an aftermarket one that fits rather loosely in the original hole. When he first put it on he used a center punch to try to 'peen' the sqaure pin on the sight to tighten it up and hold it in place. Well that didn't work to well, as the first time it got bummped, it came loose.

    Now the question. He wants me to silver solder it back on. What will the heat of brazing do to the Parkerizing? I have some 1200 degree easy flow that I would use for this. I don't want to ruin the finish if this is to hot.

    I used some Sta-Silv to hold it in place for now. It feels pretty secure, but I don't know how much heat and shock it can take. One other thing, if it means anything, it has been ported.



    ------------------
    Gene
    Gene

  • #2
    Parkerizing is a form of oxidizing metal, and heat will affect it.

    You might look in Brownell's catalog, they have staking tools that will do a much better job than using a centerpunch. Silver solder is the ultimate fix, but repairs to the finish will be needed.
    Jim H.

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    • #3
      Is the sight the correct one?

      There are narrow and wide tennon front sights. Sounds like a narrow one may be in a wide slot.

      A dovetail front sight would also take care of the problem with a little machining.

      James

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      • #4
        The heat of EasyFlo silver solder will damage the finish, but not to a great extent. The damage can be minimized by quenching in oil while still red hot, be careful of the flames from the oil. It WILL be noticible, a difference in color (slightly blacker) and obvious. The best solution is a new sight, get the correct width tennon (there are three widths made, from 1/16" to 3/32" to 1/8") and a propper staking tool. Best to take to a compentent gunsmith, the tool is expensive, make sure he has one.

        Your soft solder fix should work OK, I used to do that long ago and they held well if done correctly, no damage to the finish either.

        Installing a dovetail sight is annother good fix, requires a special cutter available from Brownells ( http://www.brownells.com/ )and fairly expensive. This is the latest "new" rage for .45 Auto fans.
        Steve

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        • #5
          Thanks for the advice. I kinda thought it might damage the finish.

          And as far as the width, that looks like it is the problem. This sight looks to be 3/32 and the hole is 1/8.

          What I'll do is see how my soft solder job holds up. If it doesn't we'll get the right size. The guy has a jig and staking tool. He just couldn't find it.

          Thanks again for the advice, and Happy New Year.


          ------------------
          Gene
          Gene

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          • #6
            Topct, If that is the Sta-Sil that uses the Sta-bright flux your in luck. If its the stuff I have used in the past (low temp/low silver content) its about 5x stronger than the normal lead/tin solder. I have used it soley for the purpose of soldering front sights onto muzzle loaders, none have come loose, its plenty strong. Most of my barrels are bright finished but some are blued thats why I used the low temp solders, the bluing stayed just fine. Not having ever used it I would venture a guess that you will cook the park off at 1200 degrees. I just wanted to let you know that I have had good luck with the Stay Bright Silver solder for front sights. Uncrichie...

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            • #7
              Reference to the last post, "not having ever used" refers to 1200 degree silver solder. Uncrichie...

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              • #8
                If you are going to put a 3/32 peg in a 1/8 hole you will have little hope of getting the sight in straight or centered. Your best bet is to aquire a new sight and install correctly.

                ------------------
                Paul G.
                Paul G.

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                • #9
                  amen, Paul
                  Jim, By the river enjoying life...

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                  • #10
                    uncrichie, that's what it is, good stuff. I have been using it for years to solder on the ends of motorcycle cables.

                    Paul, that's the problem alright. Hopefully my fix will hold it on. But if it doesn't, we can get the right one and stake it in place. In the meantime, 'no damage done'.

                    ------------------
                    Gene
                    Gene

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