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16ga punch update (photo)

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  • 16ga punch update (photo)

    Thanks to your help I put together a crude but workable punch (nibbler) for 16ga steel windmill blades. All I had for steel was 5/16" X 1 1/2" Oil hardening so I made the punch and die from that. Was able to use mill attachment on lathe to make punch but had to drill and hand file the 0.371 " X 0.321" rectangular hole through the die (good zen). Hardened and tempered with oxyacetyline torch, oil quench and wife's oven at 450F. Fit the punch to the arbor press with two 3/8" dowels and 1 3/8" cap screw. Glad I stuck to the small size to use as a nibbler rather than trying to punch the 0.371" X 2" at once. The first punch through 16ga takes about all I want to pull on the so-called 2 Ton arbor press. Sucseeding nibbles are only cutting on 3 sides so aren't bad. The 10% of thickness clearence seems to work fine. Thanks for the input.


    At 40' up in a good March wind, I think they will look great.

  • #2
    Looks very good. I've see a few windmills but can't remember what that cut out was for. Are you going to have to do many blades?

    Frank

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    • #3
      Is the die broached? Edm'd? Filed?

      I've made a couple of dies like that, but always made em in two pieces cause it was quicker.

      -Jacob

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      • #4
        Slick!
        To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

        Comment


        • #5
          I really should have read that before responding.

          Time for bed I guess.

          -Jacob

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          • #6
            Snowman,
            Tell me about making the die in two pieces. I'm all ears.

            Comment


            • #7
              I did a similar project using electricians greenlee knock out dies. My larger arbor press had to be "tightened up" as it was too loose to hold tolerance. It is laying outside somewhere now.

              I was punching panel doors, 1 7/32" holes and got tired of the drilling, tapping. It didn't work that great. I needed hydraulics. With a cheater bar it did work. I bent one lid and the $160 box made me go back to drilling and hand pulling holes.

              I too am interested in your windmills, are they models? toys?

              David

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              • #8
                Two pieces would be splitting the square hole so as to make it easier to create it by milling etc.

                Then you attach both to a base, preferably doweling them in place to hold as opposed to just using screws. The base is cut away to allow the slugs to escape.

                For a plain square hole it isn't as important unless you need sharp corners. Get into odd shapes with a need for sharp inside corners on the die, and you are almost forced to split the die up like that. I have made a few punch and die sets for my use, and have had to let-in pieces, etc, etc, to get the shapes.

                A die for a round washer with a flat, for instance, is much easier if you turn the hole and then let in a piece to form the flat.
                CNC machines only go through the motions.

                Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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                • #9
                  Here is a picture of what I did to my arbor press to hold punches. The holder will accept 1/2" square tool stock. It has springs to help with the return. Works very well for me.



                  Joe

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                  • #10
                    Now "that's" a arbor press. Gear reduction big lever. I hang my 300lbs on that handle and something is gonna move.

                    I got a Hydraulic Rousselle Press I just moved inside. I have a corner notcher and 6" brake for it. With the slide it has a hole punch would be a obvious addition.

                    David

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                    • #11
                      Here is another use for the arbor press.
                      I modified a spade drill and mounted it on the ram to cut louvers for an engine project, and some electrical panels.





                      Mine also has a 3/4 bored hole in the end of the ram, for any number of staking and bending tools.


                      Nothing much new under the sun.

                      kap

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                      • #12
                        Sorry...wasn't paying attention again.

                        Like J Tiers said...Only I didn't have two slots that had to be lined up. I used one piece of metal, cut a slot in it on the mill, then sandwiched another piece of metal up to it using SHCS's and a couple dowel pins. I then put it back on the mill and used a fly cutter to make sure everything was at the same height.

                        It doesn't have any relief, but for little stuff and short runs, it still worked ok.

                        -Jacob

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                        • #13
                          Oh yea,
                          Here's another press set up for embossing and spacing rivets in train car panels.



                          Nothing new under the sun

                          kap

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                          • #14
                            I suspect that the large amount of pressure required to punch out the hole might be due to the top (male part) die having to square a face on it, I would suggest a larger angle on the cutting face so that it cuts one corner first then proceeds to cut the rest of the square if that doesn't produce the required tolerence then have two opposite corners hit first followed by the rest of the square. The extreme amount of pressure is due to an attempt to cut out the entire square all at the same time. Just a thought if your happy with the current approach thats ok too.

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