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Picture program slooooww, but why? Evan?

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  • Picture program slooooww, but why? Evan?

    I have bad ol MS "picture it" 2001 on the machine, for general purpose picture diddling, size adjustment, etc. I do have another one, but its too much work.

    The problem is the speed of this program, on an 800mHz machine, win 98 SE.

    For some reason, this program gets slower and slower over time. It took 3 1/2 minutes to bring up a menu just now, with 4 pics having been inspected. When the menu appears, getting the pic to display is fast, however.

    It is consistent. no pic loaded, quick to get teh load menu. View one pic, even if you then close it, and its 35 sec to open the menu to see another. Two pics, 1 1/2 minutes....etc, etc.

    Used to be faster, which leads me to wonder if the total number of pics viewed or worked with affects it.

    No, nothing else is slow, and AVG7, spybot, ZA, etc are keeping things clean....not that kinda problem.

    I am assuming that it keeps some sort of master list and has to page thru a longer and longer list each time to prepare itself. Just the sort of thing MS might do.

    Might this be a teaser program, meant to "force you" to buy the real one? The computer came with a bunch of stuff, most of which was deleted and reloaded with what I want. This might have been one of the original adjuncts to "works" that was on it.

    Is there any reason for this, or a cure? It's pretty stupid-slow.

    Thanks
    JT
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    It's a microsoft product, if you read the fine print, says "Eventual complete reinstallation of entire system required to keep performance acceptable"

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    • #3
      Sounds like a memory (Page file) issue to me.

      Try loading the pics as said until very slow. Does a reboot fix the speed issue? If so then it may be the page file (swap file) being refreshed during reboot which gives you your speed back.

      How much physical ram do you have. Most imaging software will use, and love, as much as you can throw at it.

      My box has 1 gig and works nicely. I have had machines with less and the page file will get bogged down with histogram sequences of some imaging software.

      Just my penny and a half. JRouche.
      My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

      https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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      • #4

        When you open the program, or try and load a picture, the program is probably scanning the directory looking for images. It's probably building thumb nails (Small images) of the larger images. Your program is probably getting slower and slower because you're probably collecting more and more images in the same directory that this program is scanning every time you load it.

        -3Ph

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        • #5
          I thought of the directory issue, but then realized that the camera software stores the pics by date, in separate directories. So that isn't the deal.
          Some OTHER function may store a lot of thumbnails, that's possible, but I don't see how to verify it directly, as I have looked the obvious places already.

          A reboot restarts the program, of course, so yes, that puts it back to "no picture" status.

          Memory is 256MB. I have noticed that at work, going to 1GB from 256MB produced no speed change.


          [This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 01-04-2005).]
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

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          • #6
            Sounds like a memory "leak" issue. Go to Start>Programs>Accessories>System Tools and start up the System Monitor. Then in System Monitor Add a new item to monitor. Pick from the memory category "Allocated Memory" and set the view to Bar Chart or just numerical.

            Keep this running and open Picture It. Load a pic and you should see the amount of allocated ram increase. Close the pic and the ram should fall back to the previous value. Do this several times. If the ram does not fall back to where it started then there is a memory leak. This is the single most common programming fault there is. Unfortunately there is nothing you can do about it. Also, just after booting the machine you should see no more than about 140 megs of allocated ram. If you have more than that allocated the there are too many things running.
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            • #7
              It could also be the pictures you are opening. Sometimes pictures are big, like scanned 8.5x11 pages in color.

              Another possibility is you have some sort of timeout happening. DO you have network drives that perhaps are being scanned?

              Kevin

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              • #8
                I seem to remember that particular software getting poor reviews a while ago.

                A lot of software is available for a trial period,you could always download a few programs and pick one you like better.

                I've always found Adobe "Photoshop Elements" now at version 3 an intuitive and easy to use photo editing program.Never had a problem with it,or the full blown Photoshop.

                Allan

                [This message has been edited by Allan Waterfall (edited 01-05-2005).]

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                • #9
                  As Allen said, that program has issues and Micro-Shaft knows about it. I had the full version installed. Added MS Works and instantly had a junk computer.

                  ------------------
                  Gene
                  Gene

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                  • #10
                    Jerry,

                    Also make sure you have downloaded and installed the GDI security update for Picture It. It is susceptible to the Jpeg of Death.
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                    • #11
                      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
                      Jerry,

                      Also make sure you have downloaded and installed the GDI security update for Picture It. It is susceptible to the Jpeg of Death.
                      </font>
                      When I looked, version 2001 was NOT on the MS list of baddies...LATER ones were. And, I ONLY use it for my own pics from camera. Mozilla is my default for opening general jpeg files.

                      Could have not been on the MS list just bacause they didn't think anyone would still be using something "that ancient"......

                      I looked for memory leaks, and found nothing suggesting one.

                      I know about leaks, the network version of Symantec AV would sink the titanic....I have to reboot at work after it runs, to get back my 1 gB....it eats up all of it. (no I did not choose it...)

                      I suspect it is cataloguing thumbnails, or re-creating them somehow each time...It has gotten worse with time and increase in number of total pics, even though they are in different directories.

                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

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                      • #12
                        Have a look in the startup folder for Microsoft Findfast. If there get rid of it.
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                        • #13
                          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by J Tiers:
                          When I looked, version 2001 was NOT on the MS list of baddies...LATER ones were. And, I ONLY use it for my own pics from camera. Mozilla is my default for opening general jpeg files.

                          Could have not been on the MS list just bacause they didn't think anyone would still be using something "that ancient"......

                          I looked for memory leaks, and found nothing suggesting one.

                          I know about leaks, the network version of Symantec AV would sink the titanic....I have to reboot at work after it runs, to get back my 1 gB....it eats up all of it. (no I did not choose it...)

                          I suspect it is cataloguing thumbnails, or re-creating them somehow each time...It has gotten worse with time and increase in number of total pics, even though they are in different directories.

                          </font>

                          If you're going to look for memory leaks, make sure you're looking at "Commited pages of memory" and not Allocated pages of memory. Allocated memory is actually just allocated address space. A Win32 program/process allocates memory by initially allocating address space on a page granularity, then individual pages of memory that are accessed within this address rage (initially via a page fault) get a physical page assignmed to them.

                          -3Ph

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                          • #14
                            Install photoshop and be done with it.

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                            • #15
                              The committed pages is not an available option in the system monitor. I find that allocated ram tells the tale well enough. I have a slide scanner with which the original driver would gobble 12 megs for every slide scanned and not give it back. Another "feature" of some programs that can chew through the ram is the Undo system, in particular if it allows multiple undo levels. Try disabling it or restricting it to see what happens. Another possibility is any sort of clipboard extension that allows multiple objects in the clipboard.

                              The best clue that ram is being used and not released is swap file activity.

                              Also, you can restrict cache size in the system.ini file. (Applies to 95 and 98)

                              Go to Start&gt;Run and type in sysedit&gt;OK

                              Look in the system.ini for a section labled

                              Vcache

                              Put these lines under it:

                              maxfilecache=8000
                              minfilecache=4000

                              Then save system.ini and restart the system.

                              This will constrain windows drive caching to a maximum of 8 megs ram. This will usually produce a noticable improvement in performance and fixes the ram allocation for the drive cache. You can increase or decrease the values to experiment but the maxfilecache value should always be greater than the min value.

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