Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

removing oil from a rubber flat belt

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • removing oil from a rubber flat belt

    I am having trouble getting oil off of the flat pulleys and rubber flat belt. I bought this lathe and it was already like this, and when I do a cut it will slow down and quit turning. If I tighten up the belts then the bearings start getting hot. It is an old sheldon 11" HELP

  • #2
    Try washing up dishwasher liquid or any good detergent best thing for removing oil wash liberally with this leave to soak if you can than rinse and refit or do it in situ carefully.There is nothing better for removing oil than detergent Alistair

    [This message has been edited by Alistair Hosie (edited 01-06-2005).]
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

    Comment


    • #3
      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Alistair Hosie:
      There is nothing better for removing oil than detergent Alistair

      </font>
      Actually there is....When oil gets on mine, I get a little purple cleaner on a rag, and wipe the belt and pulleys.

      As soon as it dries off, everything is back to good again.

      The nice thing is that it isn't slick like soap or detergent. And, being a base, it is somewhat protective against rust on steel, so I don't have to rinse it off.

      You may want to wash up right after, or avoid getting it on your hands, as it isn't good for skin.

      Do NOT try that with leather belting....
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #4
        Purple cleaner ...what's that? is it... isopropol alcohol
        or methylated spirits (methylated spirits is denatured alcohol with purple die in it).
        Ive found that washing powder is a very good degreaser .....this is detergent as alistair has already pointed out but washing powder is the strongest form of it avalable cheaply.
        all the best.mark

        [This message has been edited by aboard_epsilon (edited 01-06-2005).]

        [This message has been edited by aboard_epsilon (edited 01-06-2005).]

        Comment


        • #5
          Most of the purple cleaners contain 2-Butoxyethanol. Formula 409, Castrol super clean degreaser and many others all have the same thing. Don't soak in it as the MSDS indicates kidney and other possible damage from prolonged skin absorption.

          The stuff makes grease and oil drip off, is alkaline and should be rinsed with water. It also softens many paints (such as the one on my lathe ). Den

          Comment


          • #6
            if it softens paints then it will turn rubber into a mulch.
            all the best.mark

            Comment


            • #7
              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by aboard_epsilon:
              if it softens paints then it will turn rubber into a mulch.
              all the best.mark
              </font>
              Nope, it won't. Not even close.

              You must be thinking of a solvent, which it ain't.

              It is lye-based, the other stuff in it is generally a small amount of glycol.

              What it does is turn oil into a substance that washes/wipes away. Works fine, and the rubber belting is still fine after several years....
              Since I use it on a rag, it doesn't get on the paint...besides, why would your pulleys be painted on the belt surfaces?

              If you don't want to use it, pour all the soap (and water to wash off the slippery soap) on your machine that you want......
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Comment


              • #8
                I'M EASY...
                I think I'm just in a picky mood please forgive me.
                all the best.mark

                Comment


                • #9
                  Machine oil isn't saponified by strong bases as vegetable or animal fats. It can be broken up and emulsified well enough to be later skimmed off after it's had time to separate.

                  I'd also be concerned about the strong bases and detergents chemically attacking the rubber. For that reason I'd discourage water-based detergent cleaners.

                  I suggest you scrub the belt in mineral spirits paint thinner blotting off the thinner in clean toweling to get it as dry as possible and repeat maybe three time using clean thinner each time. The thinner won't attack the rubber but it will leach out the oil.

                  If the fabric in the rubber belting is absorbant, that is it wasn't thoroughly impregnated with the rubber based primer during manufacture, the belt may be impregnated with oil throughout its thickness.

                  There may be no recovering your belt's dry performance. Consider a new belt. Someplace in your nearest large city there's a belting supply house that can duplicate you old belt in possibly the identical stuff. It won't be expensive.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    After doing all this washing ,AND ,if you have the time and means, try putting your belt in kitty litter new, not used , and let it dry out a little bit.
                    mark costello-Low speed steel

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Forrest Addy:
                      Machine oil isn't saponified by strong bases as vegetable or animal fats. It can be broken up and emulsified well enough to be later skimmed off after it's had time to separate.
                      </font>
                      Whatever it does, soaking things in it makes them squeaky clean, regardless of grease, oil, old oil, hardened oil, etc.

                      Wiping the drive belt gets it to grab on the pulleys like new again....

                      My drive belt has been cleaned probably 50 times. The old SB countershaft on the machine tends to throw oil.

                      After cleaning it is just as good as ever. I would not worry too much about it being unrecoverable. If it is, it will swell up, get squishy, and look nasty. You will be in no doubt about its condition. If not, likely no problem.

                      Detergent will work too. It just is a lot more of a pain, because you need to take off teh belt to wash it, most likely. Wiping with the cleaner can be done in place.

                      Kero may work. But my experience is that most solvent washing only gets "most" of the oil off. The oil dissolves in the kero or other solvent, and it ends up left on the surfaces in proportion to the concentration in the solvent. If you want a clean pulley, that's a problem.

                      With a V-belt, not as much issue with oil, but it still is not good. I have some belts working where I can SEE oil on the pulley (but can't keep it clean) and at least for that machine, they never slip.

                      Flat belts don't like oil, they work by adhesion, which oil kills. But after washing, a modern rubber material will be fine.

                      Now, if the "rubber" truly is "rubber", as in "treated tree sap", oil will kill it. But then, so will being stretched in open air...remember your old rubber band powered airplanes?

                      Most "rubber" these days is a material that oil does not harm or attack significantly.


                      [This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 01-07-2005).]
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi
                        Have you try brake cleaner. This work fine on grain combine belts. Never try it on lathe belts.
                        Luke

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I happened on a surplus of Tric-111 and use it for "drying" materials like rubber, guns, clutches, brakes and surfaces getting ready for bluing. JRouche
                          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Starting Fluid,(either)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Use tire cleaner - DO not put armour all on it afterwards to make it look shiney though! The lye in the tire cleaner will attack the rubber slightly, but no worse than the oil already has anyway. Wash the belt well with clean water afterwards and dry with a clean shop towel and it will be fine. You can buy a rubber renew compound used by the typewriter industry to recondition platens - but that crap is quite toxic and not worth the effort unless you have free cans of it lying around like I do (Evan probably does too).

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X