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  • Compound alignment

    The question about the compound slide adjustment got me thinking about how most guys align the compound. On my 10" Logan I find that in order to machine the outside circumference of a say, a flywheel or pulley, I use the compound set parallel with the ways so it's .001" per tick of the feedscrew collar. I can't use the carriage because I'm already out of travel at that point. Problem is that if I want the cut to be parallel to ways I have to align the compound parallel too and it hasn't occured to me how to do this easily. Seems like my cuts are always tapered in one way. I'm already trying to figure out a way to get the two compound hold down nuts configured into a cam system so I don't have to constantly untighten and tighten.

    Maybe a test bar with a DI in the toolpost?

    Ken-

    [This message has been edited by kenrinc (edited 01-11-2005).]

    [This message has been edited by kenrinc (edited 01-11-2005).]

  • #2
    Even if you align the compound so it's parallel with the ways, you should still feed the tool bit by moving the carriage along the ways. You may think your able to align the compound at exactly "90" parallel with the way, but it's not and when you start feeding, you're "compounding" the error.

    -3Ph

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    • #3
      BTW, I just move my compound so it doesn't interfere with anything.. usually that's around 25 deg... The only time I use the compoind is when I'm chamfering.

      -3Ph

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      • #4
        It shouldn't be that hard to align the compound. Set it as close as you can, make a test turning, and check for taper. Adjust by loosening the compound, putting a shim between the test piece and the cutter, then turn and test again. Some simple math will now tell you how much shim to put in next time to eliminate the taper. The crossfeed must not be moved for this to work, and it would be a good idea to lock it and maybe the carriage as well.

        If you spend some time getting this adjustment down, consider making up some kind of 'squaring device' that can be used to re-align the compound to the carriage at this precise setting.

        You could also make a test piece using the carriage the normal way, then mount a dial indicator to the toolpost and traverse the test piece. The result will be the same, and this might save you some time by not having to repeatedly turn a fresh surface on the test piece .

        [This message has been edited by darryl (edited 01-11-2005).]
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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