Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

new shaper and problems (pics)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • new shaper and problems (pics)

    Well I brought the little shaper home and was stoked about firing it up and as usual theres trouble... The variable speed mechanism is the same rig as my rockwell lathe but the sheaves are PLASTIC!!!
    Well, one of the sheaves has a crack in it and just ain't gonna work. It's a Brodhead Garrett 8 and I believe the pulley is probable bakelite. Epoxy probable isn't gonna hold up to the side load so I'm open to suggestions. About 1/3 of the pulley is about to fall out.

    That's the pulley on the table


    I'm sure this happened when someone cranked the handle without it running...

    ------------------
    Hoffman in Warner Robins Ga
    Techno-Anarchist

  • #2
    Seen them in CI on cheap import wood working lathes.

    John S.

    [This message has been edited by John Stevenson (edited 01-09-2005).]
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



    Comment


    • #3
      I have the same variable pitch pulley on my B-G shaper and also on my Vernon #0 horizontal mill (same as Sheldon #0).

      According to my sources, the pulley is known as "Speed Master Hi-Lo Variable Diameter Pulley SU 6.5". Searches on Google turned up nothing, unfortunately.

      I have a page showing repairs that I had to do on my B-G: Brodhead-Garrett Shaper

      Don Kinzer


      [This message has been edited by dkinzer (edited 01-09-2005).]
      Don Kinzer
      Portland, OR

      Comment


      • #4
        Looking at your pictures again it occurred to me that you might be able to make a backing plate out of, say 1/8" sheet steel cut into a disk the size of the pulley with a center hole large enough to clear the hub. Then you could put reinforcing screws through the plate into the two pieces of the pulley flange in addition to bonding it with epoxy or other adhesive. If there are voids in the side of the pulley that faces the plate, you could fill those with epoxy.

        Don
        Don Kinzer
        Portland, OR

        Comment


        • #5
          So that's your shaper! I've looked at your site in preparation for bringing mine home. I have thought "Man, I'm glad mine isn't as whacked as that guys." I guess it is...
          Good work on yours that's some good work. I've thought about the backing plate idea and it's probably the route I'll take. I would have done it this evening but I don't have any stock. Good job for the lathe I just brought back to life.
          Actually this may be a good time to try some aluminum sand casting...

          [This message has been edited by hoffman (edited 01-09-2005).]
          Techno-Anarchist

          Comment


          • #6
            If the center section of that pulley is moveable,then it's the same thing thats on a Murray riding lawnmower.Used for the variable speed drive. About the $40.00 to $60.00 range for a new steel one.Got a free junked one for my mill from a repair shop.The bronze bushing was worn out and instead of a new $3.00 bushing,they replace the whole pulley and toss the old one.

            Comment


            • #7
              Yea George, the center sheave slides back and forth. The assy. just rides on a shaft. I'll have to check into that!
              Techno-Anarchist

              Comment


              • #8
                Hoffman:
                Try contacting Scott Logan.

                [email protected]
                http://lathe.safeshopper.com/

                Logan built the shaper before selling to B-G. He probably doesn't have parts, but Is a great supporter of the model engineering hobby and may have some usefull info.

                Did you get the vise?
                If no, I may know where to get a set of castings for a replica.

                Cheers
                Pete

                Comment


                • #9
                  <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Did you get the vise? If no, I may know where to get a set of castings for a replica.</font>
                  I need one, too. What is the source for the castings? I know of Harprit Sandhu's Atlas vise castings but I've not heard of Logan vise castings.

                  Harprit's Atlas Vise

                  Don
                  Don Kinzer
                  Portland, OR

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have fixed similar problems before.

                    What I do, and it looks like you have room, is to pin and glue.

                    The pins are put in so as to dovetail the parts together. You have to drill carefully, with the parts held tightly together.

                    I rough up the pins, and goo them and the hole with epoxy prior to insertion. Then the mating (hopefully nice and rough) surfaces are thinly coated, the parts put together, clamped, and the pins put in.

                    Pin size is as big as you can, no bigger than about 1/3 the part thickness where the pin goes. Hardened pins are probably best, as they won't deform, even though they are no stiffer.

                    The dovetailing of the pins keeps the part together, and the pins take care of bending forces. You have to make sure the pin holes are completely filled by pin and epoxy. And the pins should go well into the main part, at least 4 diameters if possible.

                    If you have one of those &$#&#@!!##@!!!! "engineering plastics" this will not work well, most are glue-repellent. But those are probably not, as they are too old, and that isn't a typical application anyway.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The pully is actually too thin to pin it. The first order of business will probably be checking out the lawnmower repair shops to find a similar replacement. It's only about 5" in diameter so I'm sure I can find a similar part.
                      Man, no "Congrats on a nice little project" or, "good looking machine Hoff!"
                      I guess everyone's thinking "Poor Hoffman, why does he keep dragging home this crap..."


                      ------------------
                      Hoffman in Warner Robins Ga
                      Techno-Anarchist

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Looks like it will be a good little machine when you get it fixed up. What fun would it be if it were simply "plug and play" Den

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hoff

                          I just want to know how to get you fired so I can start working there and find all this neat stuff. (there is no smiley for green with envy)

                          Bruce



                          [This message has been edited by rumutt (edited 01-10-2005).]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I found this for $20

                            It's real similar except it's made to ride on a 5/8 shaft where the broken one is 3/4.
                            Shouldn't be much of a problem and this one is stamped steel.
                            Lawnmower parts...far out...
                            I was thinking about just turning down the old shaft but seeing how it was a bearing surface for the old pulley (new one has needles too) I may need something hard.
                            Have to investigate further...

                            ------------------
                            Hoffman in Warner Robins Ga

                            [This message has been edited by hoffman (edited 01-10-2005).]
                            Techno-Anarchist

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'd expect the shaft is pressed or otherwise held in place. Seems to me a piece of drill rod, with a collar on the end to dimension it to the original shaft size, would do the job here.

                              Of course, I'm looking at the photos w/o benefit of my glasses, so...8^)

                              ajr

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X