Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My new barrel vise

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • My new barrel vise

    So, here's 3 photos of my newly built barrel vise, and removing a Winchester Model 12 adapter. Click on photos for a larger view.
    I cut it off twice; it's still too short
    Oregon, USA

  • #2
    I like the solid base your vice is mounted on.

    Bob

    Comment


    • #3
      Never thought about using a mill table as a base nice

      Comment


      • #4
        Nice set up. Hobby gunsmith here. I have the Wheeler barrel vise and wrench that uses the Oak blocks. What are you using here between your blocks and the barrel? I am having issues using these to remove a barrel from an Argentine 1909 Mauser. I tried just the blocks using the rosin, tightened as far as I could, barrel turns. I tried using aluminum and copper sleeves in new blocks. Still the barrel turns. I should state that I had this barrel in a vise with the receiver pointing up and a piece of clear fuel line in the chamber to hold deep creep penetrating oil for four days This was no help. All suggestions will be much appreciated.

        Comment


        • #5
          powdered sugar can be used in leiu of rosin, pack in a large amount of sugar, a LOT, and clamp down on the pressure, the sugar will turn almost to a sort of solid.
          if you not trying to save the barrel, take a small parting cut in front of the receiver, this will relieve the barrel torque.
          I have never used the wood barrel blocks, mine are steel blocks with sheet lead friction shims
          Last edited by Ringo; 01-12-2020, 07:18 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by riverhawk View Post
            Never thought about using a mill table as a base nice
            I made mine to attach to the table of the Gorton 8-1/2 I used to have. But now that I don't have that any more, I guess I'll be using the 20-ton press and a torque rod coming off a wall stud so I don't flip it over.

            I took the barrel off a P14 Enfield that was rocking the Gorton around on the floor; given that the receiver wrench handle is four feet long, the breakaway torque was over 1400 foot-pounds. Things get stuck after a century or so...

            Now, if I can only *find* my barrel vise and receiver wrench; the shop fairies have moved them to some non-obvious place. I'm going to have to set out more traps.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Ringo View Post
              powdered sugar can be used in leiu of rosin, pack in a large amount of sugar, a LOT, and clamp down on the pressure, the sugar will turn almost to a sort of solid.
              if you not trying to save the barrel, take a small parting cut in front of the receiver, this will relieve the barrel torque.
              I have never used the wood barrel blocks, mine are steel blocks with sheet lead friction shims
              Thanks, never thought about trying sugar. The barrel will not be used again as it is a 7.65 that has been rechambered to 30-06. I am changing it to a 30-06.

              Comment


              • #8
                You might want to save the .765 barrel. Thay make good replacement barrel stock for .32s , as in 32x20, 32acp ,.32xwhatever.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by camplejeune View Post
                  Nice set up. Hobby gunsmith here. I have the Wheeler barrel vise and wrench that uses the Oak blocks. What are you using here between your blocks and the barrel? I am having issues using these to remove a barrel from an Argentine 1909 Mauser. I tried just the blocks using the rosin, tightened as far as I could, barrel turns. I tried using aluminum and copper sleeves in new blocks. Still the barrel turns. I should state that I had this barrel in a vise with the receiver pointing up and a piece of clear fuel line in the chamber to hold deep creep penetrating oil for four days This was no help. All suggestions will be much appreciated.
                  The simple answer is that wood blocks are more prone to slipping, by a lot, compared to steel blocks. Rosin helps, but it'll never work as well as just making yourself a set of steel blocks.

                  My barrel vise is the same style as the OP's; it's a good design that works very well. I make the steel barrel blocks by boring the correct size hole in a thick block of mild steel, then split it in half in the bandsaw.

                  In my experience, a correctly fitted steel block (with or without rosin, but no lead, paper, or other friction material needed) is much less prone to marking a barrel than wood or aluminum blocks. I've honestly never had a barrel slip in steel blocks if it was sized correctly. On the other hand, I have had barrel finishes damaged by slipping in wood and aluminum blocks. No more of those for me; they don't work well except for very light torque.


                  Also - if you're not saving the barrel and it's really stuck in the action, you can weld some tabs on it or even just lay some thick beads to prevent slipping; that works pretty well even for just holding the barrel in a bench vise. Heat helps too of course.
                  Last edited by Yondering; 01-14-2020, 12:07 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Yondering View Post

                    The simple anser is that wood blocks are more prone to slipping, by a lot, compared to steel blocks. Rosin helps, but it'll never work as well as just making yourself a set of steel blocks.

                    My barrel vise is the same style as the OP's; it's a good design that works very well. I make the steel barrel blocks by boring the correct size hole in a thick block of mild steel, then split it in half in the bandsaw.

                    In my experience, a correctly fitted steel block (with or without rosin, but no lead, paper, or other friction material needed) is much less prone to marking a barrel than wood or aluminum blocks. I've honestly never had a barrel slip in steel blocks if it was sized correctly. On the other hand, I have had barrel finishes damaged by slipping in wood and aluminum blocks. No more of those for me; they don't work well except for very light torque.


                    Also - if you're not saving the barrel and it's really stuck in the action, you can weld some tabs on it or even just lay some thick beads to prevent slipping; that works pretty well even for just holding the barrel in a bench vise. Heat helps too of course.
                    Thank you sir,

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Yondering View Post

                      The simple answer is that wood blocks are more prone to slipping, by a lot, compared to steel blocks. Rosin helps, but it'll never work as well as just making yourself a set of steel blocks.

                      My barrel vise is the same style as the OP's; it's a good design that works very well. I make the steel barrel blocks by boring the correct size hole in a thick block of mild steel, then split it in half in the bandsaw.

                      In my experience, a correctly fitted steel block (with or without rosin, but no lead, paper, or other friction material needed) is much less prone to marking a barrel than wood or aluminum blocks. I've honestly never had a barrel slip in steel blocks if it was sized correctly. On the other hand, I have had barrel finishes damaged by slipping in wood and aluminum blocks. No more of those for me; they don't work well except for very light torque.


                      Also - if you're not saving the barrel and it's really stuck in the action, you can weld some tabs on it or even just lay some thick beads to prevent slipping; that works pretty well even for just holding the barrel in a bench vise. Heat helps too of course.
                      I want to update everyone here, I was able to remove this barrel by relieving the stress off the front of the receiver by using a hacksaw to split the barrel shoulder all the way around down to the diameter of the threads. Then I used my Dremel with a cutting disc to remove the outer portion of the shoulder all the way around the barrel on a slight angle inward grind down a bit below the shoulder touching the receiver. This allowed the shoulder to flex away from the receiver on its own. The barrel came right out using the wood blocks with rosin. I did not do any damage to the receiver face. I appreciate all the input from you all. Now to install the pre-threaded/short chambered barrel from Brownell's and set the head spacing. I have a local gunsmith that will do this for me. Moving forward I plan to make some steel blocks. Thanks again.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use Aluminum blocks and wrap the knox form with 1 1/2 wraps of card stock (i.e. the outside covers of a KBC catalog)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I make a 3" cube of stacked 3/4" plywood plates glued up. I drill it on center to match the largest barrel dia. in front of the receiver. Then I split it on center on the bandsaw. Epoxy ( hardware store epoxy) bed the two halves to the barrel at the desired location keeping the epoxy out of the split. Next day knock the cube off the barrel and clean up the split line on the band saw or belt sander. Coat the epoxy lined barrel grooves with liquid rosin( powdered rosin mixed with acetone) Let dry and put in place on the cleaned barrel making sure there is a gap at the split line. I then put the assembly in my 15 ton free standing press. Crank down until the blocks creak a little; 3 tons should do it. Apply receiver wrench and screw off or on as needed. I have never had a barrel slip or scratched the finish. Blocks are not damaged and are reusable many times.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I tried everything any of the local Gunsmiths used and nothing worked for removing military barrels to save them. I finally made blocks from aluminum and even they slipped until I started cleaning both the blocks and the barrel with acetone. The clean blocks "gall" to the clean barrel and don't slip if pulled up tight. Aluminum smears come of the barrel with WD40 on 0000 steel wool. The only barrels this doesn't work with are 1917/1914 Enfield and Mod 30 Remington. The shanks on these have so much taper they "squirt" out of the blocks the tighter you clamp them. To remove these barrels, I had to make a set of blocks to fit the barrels in front of the shank.
                            Mike

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X