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  • New pastime

    Due to waiting for a knee replacement, I haven't been able to go out hunting much. Soooo, a Bug-A-Salt gun has become my new goto weapon of choice. Death on yellow jackets and hornets. Used to pot them as they came in for water from the porch fountain, have now gotten pretty good on wing shots. I have noticed that the occasional fly that manages to get in when I let the dogs in or out does not always dies instantly with a direct hit, but the wife will find it dead on the floor later. Started wondering what effect one grain of salt world have on a flies body chemistry? Sheez, what we'll do to avoid boredom.

  • #2
    Salt kills bacteria by dehydrating it. Salt has a greater affinity for water than the bacteria cell. I the fly didn’t die from the blunt trauma, I suspect the salt will do some major organ damage by the same process.

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    • #3
      Have you guys not seen the old trick with a drowned fly? Salt piled on a drowned fly will bring him back to life. Seen it myself.
      Sarge41

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      • #4
        So how do you make a salt bug shooter?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rogee07 View Post
          So how do you make a salt bug shooter?
          Buy it from Cabelas for about 35 bucks

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          • #6
            A guy that I used to work with used a pellet pistol to shoot the wings off of flies. Just the air would rip their wings off. In kind of an odd way it was funny watching them trying to fly away with no wings. Kind of warped but he got a lot of laughs out of it.
            OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

            THINK HARDER

            BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

            MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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            • #7
              I remember a gent who built tiny simple aircraft from balsa and plastic film, like food wrap. He would trap flies, sedate them with a dab of chloroform in a jar. He then took the sedated fly and superglue it to the little plane. When the fly came to and flew away he found himself to be the engine and pilot of a tiny airplane. Most entertaining seeing a miniature flying circus. Of course someone would disapprove, but i do lots of things that are disapproved of and am quite happy with myself.

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              • #8
                ^^ Thanks Iron. that brought back memories.
                An uncle did it as a kid in the 1930's. He went on to be a B17 and 29 pilot in WW2 then finished out his career as a bird colonel in the 70's.
                When we were kids he told the stories of building them which had us all in stitches.

                Kinda like this and man did we take it all in:

                It's gotta be light. Toothpicks are too heavy. Use the dried long pine needles for your fuselage and wing frames.Get the thinnest saran wrap you can find.
                You don't want typical black flies they ain't got no power. Ya gotta go by the garbage cans to get the high power green ones.
                He'd stun them somehow I've forgotten then glue them on.
                The stories got insanely funny when he was making multi engine airplanes. The flies would often fight each other with asymetric thrust and the plane would do stunts.
                He'd dance around imitating the plane in flight and we were almost peeing ourselves with laughter.
                He'd bet with his buddies who would ave the longest flights.

                I tried to make some but didn't have luck with the engines.

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