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  • Revolver Question

    Is there a rule for wheel length to round length For eg a .22 .950 + - the wheel length would be ? 1 1/4 or 1 1/2" does it matter Or it based on over all looks of the finished gun

  • #2
    There is no rule. The Maximum possible over all length of the cartridge you intend to chamber the cylinder for, is going to dictate the minimum cylinder length. You can find some pretty short weird looking cylinders on competition revolvers, these days.

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    • #3
      Thanks rogee97 that was quick, thanks that confirmed my thoughts. couldn't find an answer on net so I'll go with looks

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      • #4
        Why would match pistols have short cylinders? Less head space and quicker to engage the rifling in the barrel?
        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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        • #5
          A good portion of hand gun competition, is speed oriented, matches are sometimes won or lost by fractions of a second. By shortening a cylinder you are also reducing the weight of the cylinder. A lighter cylinder Is thought to be easier to cycle fast, I have had short cylinders made out titanium, super light. Funny I was still the slowest kid on block.

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          • #6
            Another reason was to be able to set the barrel back in the frame far enough so the bullet was actually in the case and forcing cone at the same time. AKA: No Freebore! This was done to increase accuracy.

            wbldon

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            • #7
              Wibidon how does the cylinder rotate into battery won't the round tip hit the out side of the barrel

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              • #8
                Kiwi,

                Two things:
                First most cylinders are longer than the loaded round so you take down the cylinder length so the entire round is "just" inside the cylinder.
                Second, most target shooters use to shoot wad cutters that are loaded just barely longer than the brass so accuracy suffers when the cylinder is left full length as it will free bore for the distance from the case mouth to the forcing cone in barrel. To eliminate this free bore you cut the cylinder to just longer than the loaded round (you can't put a full length round in the gun as it will not allow you to turn the cylinder) then set the barrel back to allow the barrel to cylinder gap you want.

                Hope this answers your question....

                wbldon

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                • #9
                  Ahh I now understand the bullet is still in the case when entering the forcing cone on firing sorry a bit slow It's an age thing

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