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Installing a 22 barrel liner

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  • Installing a 22 barrel liner

    Hello all, I have my new .22 cal liner, barrel all bored out to suite, now to install. The options are solder or "glue". All the on line help that I find are "glue" , either epoxy or loc-tite. I thing that I prefer all metal... solder. And I'm pretty proficient in that work. But questions... what flux, non corode or acid? Do you sweat the entire barrel length or just near the ends? Anyone here ever done the solder install? Heat control has got to be critical, I would think. Suggestions , please.

    Joe B

  • #2
    Joe,
    I have done 20+ .22 reline jobs. Tried 3 or 4 different ways, and by far the fastest way is with red loctite. no clean up, almost impossible to make a mistake. No matter how good you are with solder, and I have done a lot of soldering, you will not be sorry if you loctite the liner in place. The only thing you have to do is make sure that the hole you have drilled in the barrel does not exceeds the clearance recommended for the loctite product you intend to use.

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    • #3
      Soldering is the old way to install liners, that was before we had all these new adhesives. I use Acraglas from Brownells not the gel but the original. It gives you plenty of working time and will fill any gaps or other voids left from drilling. Its really just a matter of what you are used to.

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      • #4
        I'll second Acraglass. After mixing it if you set the mixing cup in ice water (don't let any water get in the mixture) it will double your working time. I have done a number of guns using this method and it works great. Check the Brownell website they have instructions on installing liners and it is quite detailed & easy to follow.... wbldon

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        • #5
          OK guys, I hear you! it will be "glue" , no solder. Just have to decide what produce I'll use. The liner is a tight push fit in the bored hole, so not much clearance for epoxy.
          Joe B

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          • #6
            Originally posted by wbldon View Post
            I'll second Acraglass. After mixing it if you set the mixing cup in ice water (don't let any water get in the mixture) it will double your working time.
            A related trick to extend working time, after mixing, spread the epoxy out on a paper plate or similar flat surface. Heat buildup causes epoxy to cure faster, and if you have it in a thin layer you limit how much heat can be built. Probably wont keep things quite as slow as ice water would, but also wont make the epoxy more viscous

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            • #7
              JoeCB,

              Two items if the liner is a little tight. One thing I have done is to run the piloted drill bit into the bore from both end a few times as it will usually remove additional material which can help. Also extend the as far out to the drill chuck as possible as a lot of times there the holes meet you can get a tight spot and overlapping a bit further can help.
              Finally you can chuck the liner in the drill and use some 180 or 220 grit paper to remove some (don't go crazy) material from the outside of the liner and this might be the easiest to do. In the Brownell instructions they also suggest this. if you have a lathe you can mount the liner in the chuck and hold the other end with a live center and do the same thing. Just don't put a lot of side pressure on the liner and you want this to stay as straight as possible
              Good luck with your project, usually your first one is the most nerve racking.....
              wbldon

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              • #8
                If your liner is a tight slip fit, great, smear red loctite on the liner, push the liner in, rotate as you go. After the liner is in the barrel, rotate a few more times and you are done. You will be finished before you could mix the epoxie. No clean up other than to wipe it with a rag. no epoxie on your closes, hands, or tools to clean. If the barrel is real long apply a few drops of loctite down the barrel and let it run end to end. I was a little afraid the first time I tried it, but it is the way to go.

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                • #9
                  To be more specific If the barrel is fairly long run a few drops of loctite down the drilled barrel before incerting the tube being sure to rotate as you push the tub in.

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                  • #10
                    I f you decide on a Loctite product, it is worth studying the setting times of the various types. I had a time problem with fitting components together, and finally used Loctite 620, which allowed me to make the assembly before it set.

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                    • #11
                      I have done many 22 liners as well as 45-70 liners to repair ringed chambers.
                      I started using Loctite 620 retaining compound some years ago. Never a problem. Be sure to degrease thoroughly before Installing.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BobG View Post
                        I started using Loctite 620 retaining compound .
                        Like stated above I would personally use a retaining compound over red Loctite meant for threads. Loctite sells a few different versions, find one to suit your needs.
                        Last edited by oxford; 09-24-2020, 12:50 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Not trying to sidetrack this thread, but I have wondered about the accuracy of lined barrels. I have a sweet little Winchester 1906 .22 pump with bad rifleing and would like to re-line it. Does anyone have an opinion ?
                          Sarge41

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                          • #14
                            It seems like the accuracy would depend on the drilling that you do to the barrel in order to prepare it for the liner. Isn't it supposed to be a slip fit, anchored by a glue or solder? If that's the case even a poor prep will not cause the liner to bend. That's assuming a slip fit.

                            I just found this in the Brownells installation instructions:
                            try the liner in the drilled hole. It should fit a bit tightly, but only hand pressure should be required to push it from one end of the barrel to the other.

                            Dan
                            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                            Location: SF East Bay.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sarge41 View Post
                              Not trying to sidetrack this thread, but I have wondered about the accuracy of lined barrels. I have a sweet little Winchester 1906 .22 pump with bad rifleing and would like to re-line it. Does anyone have an opinion ?
                              Sarge41
                              You probably won't win any benchrest matches but a good quality liner, properly installed, should shoot as well or better than the original barrel.

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