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Redrilling/tapping slightly cockeyed 6-48 holes to 8-40?

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  • fishbait
    replied
    A standard mount is a dovetail front, windage adjustable rear. As for the 15 moa slope you want I would suggest using Burris rings that have the plastic inserts.This will give you everything you need without chancing a broken end mill or drill sticking out of your recivier. Can't happen you say. Well it's happened to me and a lot of other people as well. No doubt due to our lack of experence. And just to show you guys how gracious I can be I'm going to let you get the last word in.

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  • Bob Ford
    replied
    Paul

    Most people speak from their experience and it shows their knowledge of a subject. Just like any other group you weed out the B S. I personally like to hear your thoughts. On this subject I had always thought plug and drill had not thought plug and end mill. Learned another way to get job done right.

    Bob

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  • Paul F
    replied
    Generally, I like to hear other peoples opinions when they're not intimating I'm a complete retard.

    Trust me, I won't be bothering to ask any more questions HERE again.

    Amazing how a couple A-holes can spoil a place.


    Paul F.

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  • tdmidget
    replied
    Well, Paul, if you know so much more than he thinks and you've built so many rifles, why did you ask such an elementary question?

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  • JCHannum
    replied
    There are a few mounts that will allow slight misalignment of mounting holes, as it will happen.

    I am working with some 50's & 60's vintage guns and have been using Buehler mounts. They do provide for windage adjustment of the scope. I believe current Leupold mounts offer the same feature. There might be some others, none come immediately to mind.

    In the same vein, I am looking for a set of Buehler 1" high rings, or at least a front high ring I do have a rear one and a front low to trade if that helps.

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  • Paul F
    replied
    Originally posted by fishbait
    I'm thinking this guy might not know what a standard mount is or what it can do for him. Last time I bought one I paid $21.00 and it took 10 minutes to install. Do you really want to experment with a expensive gun when the obvious solution costs so little?
    "This guy" knows more than you think.
    "This guy" has built more than a few rifles.

    A "standard" mount doesn't do jack for misaligned holes. Not to mention that, but a "standard" mount doesn't have a 15MOA slope for this project either.


    Thanks to all for the HELPFUL replies (I do not include mr chum.. or fishbait, or whatever, in that thanks).

    I have some tooling on order for the boring, and to redrill and countersink the mount.

    Paul F.

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  • JCHannum
    replied
    I do question exactly what a "standard" mount is and how it can cause mis-drilled holes to move into line. I have scoped several rifles myself, have read gunsmithing books, magazines, advertising and catalogs for many years and never seen such a mount.

    On the other hand, the plugging and redrilling of holes as described seems to be a very common fix to the problem and is quite often described in the publications mentioned.

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  • biometrics
    replied
    I have seen literally hundreds of off center holes like this in Springfields and Mausers in the last 40 years...repaired in the manner already described. Put a proper length screw in the off center hole with permanent locktite. File or mill off the part of the screw that protrudes and polish, and touch with cold blue.. Then properly re-drill or use an endmill to put the hole where it belongs and retap. Once the mount is on, you will never even see the work and the scope mount will be properly mounted.

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  • fishbait
    replied
    I'm thinking this guy might not know what a standard mount is or what it can do for him. Last time I bought one I paid $21.00 and it took 10 minutes to install. Do you really want to experment with a expensive gun when the obvious solution costs so little?

    Leave a comment:


  • gzig5
    replied
    Originally posted by fishbait
    Scope mount holes out of alignment is quite common on older firearms . It's probaly why they invented the standard mount. As for redrilling the existing holes I think there's a good chance your going to trash your reciver.
    Yeah, if he were to use a drill. An endmill will clean up and straighten the holes because it does not use the existing hole as a guide.

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  • mike thomas
    replied
    Counterbore

    Dial in your existing mount hole and counter bore with a 1/4 endmill. DHT= Double Heat Treat. Fishbait, congrats on a nice, upbeat, positive first post.
    Last edited by mike thomas; 05-16-2009, 09:58 AM. Reason: typo

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  • fishbait
    replied
    Scope mount holes out of alignment is quite common on older firearms . It's probaly why they invented the standard mount. As for redrilling the existing holes I think there's a good chance your going to trash your reciver.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul F
    replied
    Thanks for the replies!

    I like the idea of boring the holes with an end mill..
    Unfortunately, I dont' have an R8 collet for a 3.5mm.
    I DID, however, find that 9/64" end mills are not difficult to find at MSC :-)

    I don't really have the option of moving the holes if I want to use the already purchased one-piece base... (ironically enough, the 9/64" end mill, and a counterbore to open the holes in the mount from 6-48 to 8-40 will probably cost what I have into the mount... but I LIKE this mount!).

    Next time I take this rifle to bits for more fitting (the safety still won't engage after a new trigger, and I have some more fitting on the detachable magazine to do..). Pesky tuning, but not as pesky as measuring the proper hole spacing and alignment, and boring new holes.

    THanks again for the replies!
    Paul F.

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  • deltaenterprizes
    replied
    DHT= double heat treat?

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  • mike thomas
    replied
    Two Options

    I shop for DHT Springfields in pawn shops. The DHT ones that have been D&Ted usually have the holes crooked. If the greater diameter of a #8 screw will clean up the hole, the easiest method to fix the problem is to plunge cut with a 9/64 endmill and tap for #8 screws.

    The other option is to make bases to match the rifle. I usually do both as bases for Springfields that take #8 screws are hard to come by.

    I'b be willing to bet a Savage receiver is not as hard as the bridge on a DHT Springfield. This should be an easy fix, and you will end up with the advantages of the larger screw size.

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