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  • 10-22 trigger adjustment

    I have a Ruger 10-22 that I like to use from time to time. but the trigger pull is abysmal, somewhere in the 8 lb range according to my RCBS trigger pull scale. All of my other rifles have some kind of adjustable pull in the trigger mechanism. Not so with the Ruger.

    What are the alternatives? Stone the sear? I am not all that familiar with such a procedure therefore reluctant to try that without guidance. What about after market assemblies like an expensive VCL 10/22 TG2000
    What are my other options options?
    Last edited by Warren; 11-26-2010, 08:30 AM.
    Warren

  • #2
    Lots of aftermarket parts available out there for improving the 10/22 trigger for DIY-ers. Simply replacing the hammer can make a world of difference.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct...tnumber=607022

    IMO -- stoning sear angles and such are better left to those folks that have the know-how to do it properly and have a SAFE fire control system afterward. I sent you a PM regarding another way to solve your problem if you are interested.

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    • #3
      I prefer the Volquartsen hammer (about $12). It does an excellent job reducing the trigger pull.

      If you feel adventuresome, you could grind down the back of the hammer ledge about 30 percent to give you a better trigger pull.

      In the attached photo the hammer at the top is a factory hammer. Note the width of the ledge on the bottom of the hammer. The one in the middle has had the back ground (to follow the arc) to about 30-40%, and the hammer at the bottom of the photo is a Volquartsen hammer.

      Make sure you do a bump fire test. The worst thing that could happen, is the hammer would not hold, and you would have to buy a new factory one from Brownells or buy an aftermarket one.

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      • #4
        Thanks guys . I will try a new hammer. That looks like a easy inexpensive solution.
        Warren

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        • #5
          My first one I bought a drop in hammer. After that I bought the jig to stone them myself. You need to be vary cautious to check it afterwards, but it isn't rocket science. Take the time to learn about triggers, get the right tools and go for it. If you screw up a hammer learning, they are cheap. The tooling cost a little so if you are just doing one, it's not worth it but if you have a few, by the third trigger, it can pay for itself.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Warren
            I have a Ruger 10-22 that I like to use from time to time. but the trigger pull is abysmal, somewhere in the 8 lb range according to my RCBS trigger pull scale. All of my other rifles have some kind of adjustable pull in the trigger mechanism. Not so with the Ruger.

            What are the alternatives? Stone the sear? I am not all that familiar with such a procedure therefore reluctant to try that without guidance. What about after market assemblies like an expensive VCL 10/22 TG2000
            What are my other options options?
            Warren. Follow these links for the rimfre central forum. I did lots od reseaerch before I customized my 10/22. Saved lots of money doing the work myself. The only major costs were the Barracuda stock and the Green Mountain SS fluted .920 20 inch long match barrel. It can place 10 rounds in nearly one hole at 50 yards if I do my job. The links are:
            http://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=123409
            This is the action reference section.
            http://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...letus+hungwell
            This is stoning the hammer thread.
            http://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=251177
            This one is polishing all the trigger group parts.
            Join the forum and research for yourself. It will be worth your while and save you lots of money. Good luck and shoot straight. Bill

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            • #7
              I second the Volquartsen, you'll love it.



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              • #8
                Trigger adjusting

                It takes more than honing the hammer and sear. I did this and the rifle began to doubble and go full auto.

                Better and lighter springs and adjustable aftermarket parts make the 10-22 trigger a great gun.
                Nat Lambeth

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Rustystud
                  It takes more than honing the hammer and sear. I did this and the rifle began to doubble and go full auto.

                  Better and lighter springs and adjustable aftermarket parts make the 10-22 trigger a great gun.
                  Nat Lambeth
                  If you had left the sear alone, it would not have gone full auto.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ron of Va
                    If you had left the sear alone, it would not have gone full auto.
                    I really should have mentioned the most important fact that if you are not sure how to safely stone and polish the trigger group parts and do not have the proper stones, then proceed at your own and others' risk. I have been doing trigger jobs since I was a young teen, and that was only after reading as many books on the subject as possible. Those of you older guys will remember that there were hardly any aftermarket suppliers of modified parts back in the early part of the 1970's. Therefore either it was do the work yourself or pay a real gunsmith to do the work which was expensive even back then. BTW, it was more fun and cost much less to do it yourself. And back then triggers were much smoother and lighter than now-a-days thanks to the greedy lawyers. I also forgot to mention that I did buy some upgraded parts such as springs. I did however machine my own hammer and trigger shims. Hey, I am retired and money is kinda hard to come by. LOL

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