Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT (sorta) re: Dicro Clean 909

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OT (sorta) re: Dicro Clean 909

    My wife is German (as in a German national). All German Frau's pride themselves in cleanliness. All windows washed once a week, every Saturday morning (winter or summer .... rain, snow sleet or hail) all windows are to be opened and the house aired. White curtains MUST be white and clean. Lamp globes are to always be spotless. So, on and on and on. They also take great pride in making certain our clothes are CLEAN. And this brings me to my problem and question.

    I get oil on the fronts of my shirts AND my Frau has washed my work shirts until rendering them nearly thread-bear. Still, oil spots remain in my shirts ..... even after a year. Has anyone used 909 to rid clothes of oil. The oil I get on my shirts is DO-Drill from Brownells. Occasionally I will get Tap Magic on the front of my shirts.

    So can you see any reason that I should not try a pre-soak in 909?

    Harold
    For those having fought for it, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
    Freedom is only one generation away from extinction.

  • #2
    Not familiar with 909. However, I avoid the problem by wearing a denim apron in the shop. And they stay in the shop. When one gets too nasty to continue wearing, I just throw it away and make a new one. I get 60" 12 ounce denim for about $6.00 a yard at Jo-Ann Fabrics. A yard will make two aprons. Also, the massage therapist I use recommended Oil Be Gone. Haven't used it though.

    I forgot to say that's what she uses on the towels and sheets from her salon. Massage oil is mostly organic based though: olive, peanut, apricot, and the like.
    Last edited by KJ1I; 09-02-2013, 09:32 PM. Reason: Forgot
    Kevin

    More tools than sense.

    Comment


    • #3
      I spot all my oily stuff with Shout, an off the shelf spot remover. Works real well as long as you get it before it gets washed and sets the stain. No help on your question though.
      James

      Comment


      • #4
        Try 409 cleaner from the grocery store. It was the best thing that I ever found for cleaning oil off the bottom of my plane without hurting the paint. The citrus cleaner from Home Depot would probably work also.
        Byron Boucher
        Burnet, TX

        Comment


        • #5
          My wife uses Goop handcleaner, the non-gritty kind. She rubs it in and lets it set for a bit before putting it in the washing machine. It takes just about all the stains out I manage to acquire.

          Old Time

          Comment


          • #6
            All my shirts are oil spotted and I always wondered if dunking the whole shirt in oil would eliminate the spots.

            Comment


            • #7
              For spots I use a product called Lestol. You can find it in the cleaners aisle at the grocery store. I use a tooth brush to work it into the spots, allow to work for awhile and throw in the washer. It gets most all oily greasy spots and stains out.

              Comment


              • #8
                jmayaa, do you mean Lestoil (with an "I"). If so I use that as well. Works on clothes, will take grease and oil off of your hands as well. Use it all the time.

                Slogan used to be "Lestoil makes water wetter" according to my Dad.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Good Morning Guys,

                  In the past, I have tried many of the products that you have listed and for the most part they have been used successfully. However, if any of you guys blue or nickel plate gun parts, the product that most "Smiths" uses to degrease gun parts (just prior to bluing, etc.) is Dicro Clean which is more commonly referred to as Brownells 909. So ..... I was in hopes that some of you have *specifically* used this product to remove oil spots from clothing and that you could report your results regarding 909.

                  Harold
                  For those having fought for it, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
                  Freedom is only one generation away from extinction.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My shop clothes are my shop clothes. They do get stained with various and sundry things. I simply wash them with the rest of the laundry and consider the stains badges of honor.

                    I see no reason not to try 909 as a presoak, but will say that many of Brownell's products are readily available products repackaged by Brownell's with the price raised. I doubt it would perform any better than any of the above mentioned laundry presoaks that would be more economical.
                    Jim H.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      According to Brownell's literature, the primary ingredient in 909 is sodium metasilicate. The MSDS for it lists it as a Class 8 hazardous material and states "Do not get in eyes, on skin, or on clothing. Corrosive to eyes, skin, and digestive tract. Dust corrosive to respiratory tract. Due to high pH of product, release into surface water is harmful to aquatic life."

                      I wouldn't risk it.
                      Kevin

                      More tools than sense.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks Jim. I was hoping that you would reply given your history. I actually thought that having worked "there", you would be *the one* to really know about that product. I'm gonna give it a go and report back my experience.

                        Regards,
                        Harold
                        For those having fought for it, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
                        Freedom is only one generation away from extinction.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Harold, I am not an ex Brownell employee, that is David Kaiser who posts as 38cal. My information is based on observation and information presented by others, including David.

                          I was employed in the industrial and consumer chemical products industry and am well aware of the wide use of private labels. There is little doubt that Brownell's uses this to source many of their products.
                          Jim H.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I get the shop coats from McMaster Carr, part number 5290T64. Its all cotton, dark navy so it hides tons of stains. If its really hot I wear the denim aprons, part number 5257T4. If I am running the lathe its the coat because the apron doesn't cover the shoulders or arms and I will get coolant, oil, grunge on those areas, never fails.
                            James Kilroy

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JCHannum View Post
                              Harold, I am not an ex Brownell employee, that is David Kaiser who posts as 38cal. My information is based on observation and information presented by others, including David.

                              I was employed in the industrial and consumer chemical products industry and am well aware of the wide use of private labels. There is little doubt that Brownell's uses this to source many of their products.
                              Oh! But of course. I don't know why I did that. Please accept my apologies.

                              Harold
                              For those having fought for it, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
                              Freedom is only one generation away from extinction.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X