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TIG Welder Advise

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  • #16
    Lurking about the pages and soaking up information. Years back I bought a ThermalArc hf inverter tig/stick welder. It was dual voltage and gas cooled. We’re talking 1988-90 here. It was an amazing machine for a one man custom shop. Added helium and welded aluminum like a dream tho’ not as shiny as ac welding. I keep thinking I am going to have to look at the new offerings soon but this little beast still keeps on humping up the hill, never a hiccup. If an Everlast can match that, I’m in.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
      I love my 210EXT with cooler!! A GREAT set-up!
      Click image for larger version

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      What would the main advantage be of the 210EXT over the 200DV model? Looks like digital control and additional waveforms? What do they bring to the table? I'm not sure I can utilize all that working on cars and my other projects.

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      • #18
        Digital controls, one extra wave on the ac side, Pulse on DC side not just AC, Advanced pulse AC side, 9 channel Memory, Pulse Frequency up 500 hz.

        I have spent some time on a Miller Dynasty and I can say there isn't 3000K difference between my 210 EXT and the Dynasty.
        Buy the 210EXT you won't look back. The only thing I wish I had is a larger machine like the 350EXT.

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        • #19
          I'm having trouble digesting the extra $700 to get from the $850 185DV to the $1550 210 EXT. But, the 185 doesn't have a pedal or the extra torch the EXT comes with. I am putzing with car body panels, bracketry, and steel tubing for the most part. I'd like to have the capability to weld aluminum on occasion for stuff that my MIG spool gun won't handle. Though I love having good quality, capable tools, I don't know if I can justify the extra cost.
          The Eastwood TIG 200 is on sale for 700 with free shipping and comes with a pedal, but doesn't seem to be too sophisticated.

          If I had it to do over, I would have gone with the 140Amp MIG welder instead of the 200A Hobart and spent savings toward the better TIG. The toy/tool budget is stretched pretty thin.

          I may have to dig out my old red HF TIG welder. I put it in hiding when I had my Miller Dialarc HF, which had to be sold a couple years ago. It is a scratch start, but it worked OK for steel and for the time being, quarter panels and patch panels will be the main focus. I'd like to use TIG to keep the warpage to a minimum and the weld ends up being softer and easier to work.

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          • #20
            I really like my water cooled HTP 221 - zero problems. Same with my HTP 2400 Mig machine

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            • #21
              I'm now leaning towards the PrimeWeld 225X. Has a good warranty, quality torch and accessories, and plenty of control features like pulse. It's a big bastard but won't break the bank at $800 shipped. It gets very good reviews.

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              • #22
                AHP201XD... to many features. LOL. I just melted some stainless together today with it.
                *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by gzig5 View Post
                  I'm now leaning towards the PrimeWeld 225X. Has a good warranty, quality torch and accessories, and plenty of control features like pulse. It's a big bastard but won't break the bank at $800 shipped. It gets very good reviews.
                  I bought the AHP a couple months ago, wish now that I had bought the Primeweld. Its a better deal, CK brand torch/cable and warranty that does not require YOU pay shipping both ways.

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                  • #24
                    Your post is a good example why I am wary of these modern welders. Something lets the smoke out and no warranty, well you're outta luck.... My 1980s era transformer stick welded looked like it epxloded given the amount of smoke it let out a few weeks ago when I was welding some rebar, but it was just two RIFA caps needed replacing and I had some already so 10 minutes and it was welding again, welds better than ever now with fresh new caps.

                    And my 1990s Stick/TIG welder I replaced the same caps on before they blew. I like being able to fix my own tools.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post

                      I bought the AHP a couple months ago, wish now that I had bought the Primeweld. Its a better deal, CK brand torch/cable and warranty that does not require YOU pay shipping both ways.
                      I looked at the Primeweld website and could not find a manual for their 200 amp TIG machine nor a copy of their warranty. Their web page does not give any of the common specs such as duty cycle. As a matter of fact, the web site is a typical chinglish mashup of odd statements that may or may not apply to the machines in question.

                      Where did you find information about the machines?

                      Dan
                      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                      Location: SF East Bay.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by danlb View Post

                        I looked at the Primeweld website and could not find a manual for their 200 amp TIG machine nor a copy of their warranty. Their web page does not give any of the common specs such as duty cycle. As a matter of fact, the web site is a typical chinglish mashup of odd statements that may or may not apply to the machines in question.

                        Where did you find information about the machines?

                        Dan
                        Lot of reviews all over the web on the Primeweld Tig 225 I am sure if you contact them they would be happy to give you a copy of the printed warranty, its 3 years and they have 7 day a week phone support. You can see the genuine CK worldwide torch/hose in the pics on their website as well as in the reviews once again.

                        Lot of questions, such as duty cycle answered here (direct sales via amazon) https://www.amazon.com/ask/questions...sAnswered=true

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                        • #27
                          I looked at the Amazon answers and it's a typical bunch of Q&A by people who are not related to the manufacturer. Nothing there that could be banked upon. I was just wondering if it was a real 100% warranty that was written and easily enforced or if it was a typical "defects in materials and design" type of thing. Lincoln publishes it's warranty at https://www.lincolnelectric.com/warranty. AHP includes it in their manual (available online). That's what I was expecting to find for Primeweld.

                          I tried to find an impartial review, but I could not find any that did not include snippets of text from the seller's web site (such as helps with make spot welds). Mechanic416 of weldersweb.com did a review on amazon, but I could not locate it.

                          Dan
                          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                          Location: SF East Bay.

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                          • #28
                            I felt this review was pretty impartial. He was obviously impressed with the machine. He doesn't seem to be on any manufacture's payroll.
                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-YkWY3nVAlY
                            My understanding of the warranty is that is covers the machine for three years and they pay shipping both ways, which is significant. Supposed to be 7day a week tech support too. It gets 90% five star rating on Amazon, which seems to lead it's contemporaries. For $800 it looks pretty good. I can go through three of these before I could pay for a Miller of similar capability.

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                            • #29
                              The reason that I put some importance on a written warranty is the following experience:

                              1) Tivo DVR had Lifetime service, but Tivo decided that the lifetime was over once the disk drive crapped out.
                              2) Miller welders have a great waranty. It starts when you buy the welder, or 1 year after it was shipped to the distributor (not dealer), whichever comes first. Things like relays are considered consumables and are not covered. https://www.millerwelds.com/-/media/...y/warranty.pdf
                              3) Toyota covered the wife's new car bumper to bumper. Squeaks and rattles excluded. They fixed the rattle under a service advisement, but created a squeak that only happens on hot days.
                              4) Lincoln welders cover the rectifiers for several years, but some things are 90 days. At least their warranty starts when you buy it.
                              And the list goes on.
                              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                              Location: SF East Bay.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by danlb View Post
                                The reason that I put some importance on a written warranty is the following experience:

                                1) Tivo DVR had Lifetime service, but Tivo decided that the lifetime was over once the disk drive crapped out.
                                2) Miller welders have a great waranty. It starts when you buy the welder, or 1 year after it was shipped to the distributor (not dealer), whichever comes first. Things like relays are considered consumables and are not covered. https://www.millerwelds.com/-/media/...y/warranty.pdf
                                3) Toyota covered the wife's new car bumper to bumper. Squeaks and rattles excluded. They fixed the rattle under a service advisement, but created a squeak that only happens on hot days.
                                4) Lincoln welders cover the rectifiers for several years, but some things are 90 days. At least their warranty starts when you buy it.
                                And the list goes on.
                                GREAT advise! It's not the same at it was. Technology is better but makes the machines more prone to fail.

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