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Bought me a new TIG

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  • Bought me a new TIG

    So I finally opted to get myself a compact tig welder and chose Sherman brand inverter. Found a lot of good words on this particular model and to be honest, so far I am really impressed with all aspects of the machine. Nice assembly, 2 year warranty from the seller and it lays beads like a charm. Very smooth and stable arc even down to the bare minimum amperage of 5A in dc modes. It has all the main bells and whistles of a generic contemporary ac/dc machine (pulse modes, frequency and balance adjustment etc.). I especially like that the fan is temperature controlled and only comes on when there is a need for additional cooling. It is quiet most of the time and very subtle even when it comes on. Unlike most machines that tend to scream continuosly.
    Last edited by markx; 10-18-2020, 05:25 AM.

  • #2
    Looks good, where did you buy it? Never heard of that brand.

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    • #3
      So, ac/dc selectivity? That’s really great in a compact inverter welder. I have a little Thermalarc 190 from 20 years ago and is still a good machine, but i have always wished for ac side for it. I am guessing its gas cooled, so if you plan on doing a lot of work with this machine, invest in a second bottle for backup. Your shop looks clean and well organized. Good on you.

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      • #4
        All the grey name brands are offering AC/DC machines now. Everlast, AHP, Eastwood, Harbor Freight, etc.
        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ironbearmarine View Post
          So, ac/dc selectivity? That’s really great in a compact inverter welder. I have a little Thermalarc 190 from 20 years ago and is still a good machine, but i have always wished for ac side for it. I am guessing its gas cooled, so if you plan on doing a lot of work with this machine, invest in a second bottle for backup. Your shop looks clean and well organized. Good on you.
          The technology has really advanced and the cost has come down considerably as far as inverter type contraptions are regarded. The full namebrand machines still have a ridiculous price tag, but the "more or less noname" ones have become very much affordable and include all of the AC/DC features that one could possibly need. This one has an official distributor in Poland and it comes with documents granting official warranty, so it can't be a completely dark transaction. For 550$ with shipping I do not expect a miracle, but I seldom would anyways. The namebrand ones that currently cost about five times the price tend usually to screw you over just as badly if you happen to run into problems. That is just my personal experience, so please do not take any offense, as my intention is not to generalize. But I kind of doubt that I could burn down five Shermans with my hobby activites to break even with the price tag of an ESAB or Migatronic Besides, the internal topology of them machines is very much alike and the high cost ones really do not include any kind of higher magic in their circuitry.

          It is gas cooled and I do not intend to use it for heavy duty welding, rather for the odd specialty job here and there, so I guess it will do just fine in terms of power and duty capabilities.

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          • #6
            Can't speak to the cost outside of the USA, but one of my local welding suppliers sells a Lincoln AC/DC pulse for only about 2-1/2 to 3 times that of the grey brands. Since I've only made a grand total of 4 very short stainless TIG welds since acquiring one I suspect my AHP will last a long time. Certainly its outlasted its own warranty and the warranty of the Lincoln. LOL. The only advantage to me about the Lincoln would be if it failed I could drop it off at my local shop, pay the price of an AHP for repairs, and a week or three later pick it up repaired.... In theory.

            Funny thing about those stainless welds. I was welding cross handles onto pull pins. Hole drilled in cross handle the size of the pin. I got total crap welds until My son suggested just pushing the pins thru so they stick out a little, and using them as their own filler. Worked perfectly. Then when I grabbed the filler wire to put it away I realized I had grabbed some aluminum wire instead of stainless wire.
            Last edited by Bob La Londe; 10-19-2020, 02:39 PM.
            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
              Funny thing about those stainless welds. I was welding cross handles onto pull pins. Hole drilled in cross handle the size of the pin. I got total crap welds until My son suggested just pushing the pins thru so they stick out a little, and using them as their own filler. Worked perfectly.
              Today's word of the day is "autogenous".

              "An autogenous weld is a form of welding, where the filler material is either supplied by melting the base material, or is of identical composition. The weld may be formed entirely by melting parts of the base metal and no additional filler rod is used. There is some variation in the use of this term."

              This is my favorite type of weld, and the only one that makes me look like a weldor.
              It's all mind over matter.
              If you don't mind, it don't matter.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MrWhoopee View Post

                Today's word of the day is "autogenous".

                "An autogenous weld is a form of welding, where the filler material is either supplied by melting the base material, or is of identical composition. The weld may be formed entirely by melting parts of the base metal and no additional filler rod is used. There is some variation in the use of this term."

                This is my favorite type of weld, and the only one that makes me look like a weldor.
                Autogenous welds have their place and i would say based on experience, they are not good for stress loads or loads subjected to heavy vibration on stainless steel weldments. My experience came from building stainless steel vacuum ovens in the silicon chip industry. The main chamber was made from 18ga. 304L stainless steel. The chamber had an external re-enforcement of 1x angle stainless. This bracing was autogenous welded to chamber. Every one of the ovens failed and were returned. About 200 of them. The welds for the bracing all crystalized and cracked. An engineer determined that the welds were starved for alloys that were consumed in the fuse weld process. We repaired the ovens using filler rod and used filler rod on subsequent product and never had a failure again. Those ovens were subjected repeated flexing from the high vacuum and relief sequence. Like oil canning. Anyway just my experience.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ironbearmarine View Post

                  Autogenous welds have their place and i would say based on experience, they are not good for stress loads or loads subjected to heavy vibration on stainless steel weldments. My experience came from building stainless steel vacuum ovens in the silicon chip industry. The main chamber was made from 18ga. 304L stainless steel. The chamber had an external re-enforcement of 1x angle stainless. This bracing was autogenous welded to chamber. Every one of the ovens failed and were returned. About 200 of them. The welds for the bracing all crystalized and cracked. An engineer determined that the welds were starved for alloys that were consumed in the fuse weld process. We repaired the ovens using filler rod and used filler rod on subsequent product and never had a failure again. Those ovens were subjected repeated flexing from the high vacuum and relief sequence. Like oil canning. Anyway just my experience.
                  I do recognize the strength limitations of autogenous welds and only use them when there is no risk of failure. I had not been aware of the alloy starvation with stainless, but it is consistent with the standard practice of using a higher grade filler than the base metal (i.e. 309 filler with 304 base). Since the alloys are things like nickel and chromium, it is unlikely that they are consumed. It would seem more likely that they migrate in the puddle leaving uneven distribution in the lattice and possibly brittle zones. One might expect the possibility of rust on autogenous stainless welds, though I haven't experienced it.
                  It's all mind over matter.
                  If you don't mind, it don't matter.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MrWhoopee View Post

                    I do recognize the strength limitations of autogenous welds and only use them when there is no risk of failure. I had not been aware of the alloy starvation with stainless, but it is consistent with the standard practice of using a higher grade filler than the base metal (i.e. 309 filler with 304 base). Since the alloys are things like nickel and chromium, it is unlikely that they are consumed. It would seem more likely that they migrate in the puddle leaving uneven distribution in the lattice and possibly brittle zones. One might expect the possibility of rust on autogenous stainless welds, though I haven't experienced it.
                    I have had some interesting experiences with stainless steel in the marine environment. One of the most significant was oxygen starvation of stainless. When in a state of constant and complete submersion, the stainless will erode. I had read some articles on this, and so was always cautious about where to employ stainless products. Not long back a vessel of mine sank in 45 feet of seawater it took me about six months to raise it. All of the stainless hardware was pitted or etched, the tube railings were corroded through and heavily pitted. The ship’s frames are made of wrought iron and came through quite sound. In the 1950s this wooden ship was refastened with monel bolts. Inspection showed no degradation. Anecdotal metallurgical experience switch toggled: off Click image for larger version

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                    • #11
                      Get caught with filler in a milking parlor doing welds and see how fast they bounce you to the street.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ironbearmarine View Post

                        I have had some interesting experiences with stainless steel in the marine environment. One of the most significant was oxygen starvation of stainless. When in a state of constant and complete submersion, the stainless will erode. I had read some articles on this, and so was always cautious about where to employ stainless products. Not long back a vessel of mine sank in 45 feet of seawater it took me about six months to raise it. All of the stainless hardware was pitted or etched, the tube railings were corroded through and heavily pitted. The ship’s frames are made of wrought iron and came through quite sound. In the 1950s this wooden ship was refastened with monel bolts. Inspection showed no degradation. Anecdotal metallurgical experience switch toggled: off
                        Could it be that the damage was mostly induced by chloride content in the sea water rather than oxygen starvation? Chlorides are by far the nastiest corrosion inducing agents that I know of. And stainless is rather susceptible to chloride induced corrosion. It tends to progress in a peculiar way, moving deep into the metal and creeping across cristallite boundaries. Often the surface may only show a small speck of rust, but underneath it may lie a vast cavity that reaches through the whole part. I used to work in a lab that dealt with chlorination reactors and equipment for high temperature synthesis of "carbide derived carbon".....we had a constant ambient presence of chlorides and acidic residue floating around the premises. One could literally hear the corrosion chewing through stainless parts on a quiet moment Nothing survived for long in this enterprise....not even monel and inconel type of alloys. For sure they were a lot tougher compared to stainless, but even these gave up the ghost after a while. Only PTFE parts could resist damage.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by markx View Post

                          Could it be that the damage was mostly induced by chloride content in the sea water rather than oxygen starvation? Chlorides are by far the nastiest corrosion inducing agents that I know of. And stainless is rather susceptible to chloride induced corrosion. It tends to progress in a peculiar way, moving deep into the metal and creeping across cristallite boundaries. Often the surface may only show a small speck of rust, but underneath it may lie a vast cavity that reaches through the whole part. I used to work in a lab that dealt with chlorination reactors and equipment for high temperature synthesis of "carbide derived carbon".....we had a constant ambient presence of chlorides and acidic residue floating around the premises. One could literally hear the corrosion chewing through stainless parts on a quiet moment Nothing survived for long in this enterprise....not even monel and inconel type of alloys. For sure they were a lot tougher compared to stainless, but even these gave up the ghost after a while. Only PTFE parts could resist damage.
                          The source for my reference was a 2009 Cruising World article on stainless steel corrosion. Here is a salient quote from the article:

                          “Stainless steel's primary weakness, the aforementioned crevice or pitting corrosion (there's a scientific distinction between the two, but for the purposes of this discussion, it's not relevant) occurs when it's used in an oxygen-depleted environment. The tough, nearly impenetrable oxide film that
                          forms as soon as stainless steel is exposed to air only remains intact as long as the metal is exposed to oxygen. If stainless steel is placed in an environment where it's starved of oxygen and exposed to water, either fresh or salt, it becomes susceptible to crevice corrosion, which typically manifests itself as roughness, valleys, pitting, or even wormlike holes.”

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