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Welding Table Recommendations

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  • epicfail48
    replied
    Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
    I love my cert-a-flat table! So far there's no project I couldn't clamp and weld.
    Click image for larger version

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Views:	313
Size:	3.45 MB
ID:	1949774
    Certainly got some mileage on it, if the stockpile youve got going there is any indication. How was the assembly process for you? Was it really as simple as "clamp together, weld corners, done"? Most importantly, is it actually flat?

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  • Tungsten dipper
    replied
    I love my cert-a-flat table! So far there's no project I couldn't clamp and weld.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_5025.jpg
Views:	313
Size:	3.45 MB
ID:	1949774

    Leave a comment:


  • ezduzit
    replied
    The very best welders I have known have nothing fancy--just a heavy, flat surface.

    Beginners often think they need a fancy assembly full of holes for clamps....because they don't know any better.

    Start out simple, like a thick slab of FLAT steel plate set on just about anything that will support it. After working on it for awhile you might find that you would like to embellish it a little.

    Leave a comment:


  • fjk
    replied
    Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post

    That's a good looking cart! I like the clampability of the slat design, but I cant help but thinking hat the majority of the work I do is small enough to slip right through the slats... The other issue is having a flat surface to weld a top like that together on. How much of an issue was it for you to keep that top flat during the welding?
    Thanks

    its adequate for my needs - but I don’t do stuff that’s so small that I can’t clamp/secure/etc things. Your mileage may vary.

    i was fortunate and had a huge cast iron table
    To weld it up on, with lots of clamps:-) doing it on something else (a wood work surface maybe?) would present “challenges”…



    Leave a comment:


  • epicfail48
    replied
    Originally posted by fjk View Post
    For my (minimal, hobby) welding I made a cart, about 2’x3’ that I use both to wheel the welder around on and do welding. I made it out of 1” square tube. The top is open with the tubes running in parallel, about 3” on center. I made it flat (ish) by laying the pieces out and welding them on a big cast iron welding platform at a votech high school where I took some classes.

    I like the open design since it’s easy to clamp stuff together.

    I do mig, fc, and stick on it and the things I do are not very small - some garden art, shelf structures, and so on. Maybe the end result weighs no more than 20 or 30 pounds.

    for smaller or more precise things, a solid top would be preferred.

    here (I hope) is a picture of it prior to putting it on wheels, making the lower shelf (where the machines sit when I wheel them around)!and grinding the welds for the top so it’s flatish
    That's a good looking cart! I like the clampability of the slat design, but I cant help but thinking hat the majority of the work I do is small enough to slip right through the slats... The other issue is having a flat surface to weld a top like that together on. How much of an issue was it for you to keep that top flat during the welding?

    Leave a comment:


  • fjk
    replied
    For my (minimal, hobby) welding I made a cart, about 2’x3’ that I use both to wheel the welder around on and do welding. I made it out of 1” square tube. The top is open with the tubes running in parallel, about 3” on center. I made it flat (ish) by laying the pieces out and welding them on a big cast iron welding platform at a votech high school where I took some classes.

    I like the open design since it’s easy to clamp stuff together.

    I do mig, fc, and stick on it and the things I do are not very small - some garden art, shelf structures, and so on. Maybe the end result weighs no more than 20 or 30 pounds.

    for smaller or more precise things, a solid top would be preferred.

    here (I hope) is a picture of it prior to putting it on wheels, making the lower shelf (where the machines sit when I wheel them around)!and grinding the welds for the top so it’s flatish
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • epicfail48
    started a topic Welding Table Recommendations

    Welding Table Recommendations

    Finally got my hands on a 'real' welding setup, and its got me looking for a better workspace to do my welding. Turns out, its a lot more difficult to get away with a couple sawhorses and a sheet of plywood with TIG welding, least if i want it to look good and not break my wrist doing it.

    Anyways, welding tables, whas everybody using? Shopmade or buying? Im looking for something 2'x4' or thereabouts, and would like to keep costs down as long as i still get a usable surface. I debated shopmade, but im still weighing the options. One solid sheet of plate steel, or a bunch of I-beams in slats? If plate, how thick should i be looking for, for a smaller, hobby welder work surface? I know i need something flat (enough for welding at least, dont need surface plate accuracy at least), decent sized, and most importantly able to be moved by a single determined person. Much as id love to have a 2" thick slab of steel for a table, no way in hell could i move something that massive.

    One thing on the commercial side of things that caught my eye was the Certiflat tables. They seem relatively inexpensive, and i like the construction on them, both for weight savings as well as how the design pretty much guarantees an acceptable level of flatness. Anybody have experience with their line? Id be looking at the 2'x4' table top, with a shop-made frame holding it up
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