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Welding Table Recommendations

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  • repoman
    replied
    That's really nice.

    I would recommend against the Harbor Freight $70 I have one and would have rather put that money towards some rectangle tubing to build a real table.
    The HF one is too small and has awkward slots that tend to encourage features in your parts to drop into them and can be pretty annoying. The legs on that table are also very obnoxious by being in the way of the pedal a lot (if you are TIGing).

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  • akjeff
    replied
    Have been very happy with the Certiflat 24x48. Use lots of clamps, lots of tack welds, and take your time. The degree of precision of the components was pretty darn impressive, and came out extremely flat. Fun to make too.
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  • epicfail48
    replied
    Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
    keep us updated with pictures of the build and let us know how you like it.
    Will do! Once i get my hands on it, ill probably start a new thread, just to make it easier for future people to find

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  • Tungsten dipper
    replied
    keep us updated with pictures of the build and let us know how you like it.

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  • epicfail48
    replied
    Whelp, local place wants about $500 for the custom top option, so certiflat it is. Hopefully ill be able to do that somewhat soon, itll be nice to have better fixturing options

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  • epicfail48
    replied
    Alright, finally came to a decision; drew up plans for a 3/8" thick top with a grid pattern of holes, sent it over to my local place to get a quote to have it either water or laser cut out of cold rolled. If that comes out to be cheaper than the certiflat, thats the route ill go, otherwise, certiflat it is. Now we wait

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  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    It really depends on what you want to do. This HF toy might work if you are just doing small projects. Adjustable Steel Welding Table (harborfreight.com)

    My son and I built a 3x7 frame with 9 (yes 9 legs) and lever engaged casters and laid a piece of 4x8 1/4 plate on top. The plan is someday to lay out a grid of holes for dog hardware, but we are always busy. So far our loose top (hasn't moved yet) home made welding table has been just fine. 1000% better than working on the floor.

    I was proud of us. I laid out the plan for the frame including all the braces, and my son ran the 2x2x1/8 stock through the bandsaw. Then the two of us tacked it all together top down. Finally we took turns welding it out with two welders. The Miller 212 and the Lincoln Pro Core. Vertical welds were definitely easier with the ProCore. Horizontal were prettier with the 212. We welded out the whole thing and only one (1) tack popped and only as we were reaching the end of the weld out. After we finished the frame and flipped it top side up all nine legs actually touched the floor. We added leveling feet anyway.

    Its a huge monolithic obstruction in the back shop that constantly suffers from HSD, but an inoculation of trash can usually cures that when we need it. When we started doing a little forging it made a great place to set the little propane forge that wouldn't catch fire. Now there are two anvils also creating an obstruction back there. LOL.

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  • epicfail48
    replied
    So funnily enough, a 2'x4' sheet of 1/2" cold rolled from my local place is nearly the exact same cost as the certiflat table in that size, so now im back to being conflicted... Pros for the plate are its local so no shipping, and itd be a lot beefier of a top. Cons are the weight, that size of plate weighs almost as much as i do, so getting it in my shop would be an adventure. Pros for the certiflat are the holes for easier fixturing, higher likelihood of it being flat, and again the lighter weight. Cons are the shipping costs, as well as the fact that a 3/16" top is admittedly a little thin.

    Blech, planning is too bloody complicated

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  • BigMike782
    replied
    Chunk of 1” plate and some square tube and I’m happy as a clam. If I need to work on something bigger I have horses and a couple of portable work tables.

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  • repoman
    replied
    I bought one of those cheap 60 dollar HF tables and it is a nightmare....did a good job of teaching me that being comfortable when TIG welding is just as important as having a welding unit in the first place.

    Those Certiflat tables look nice but 3/16 seems a bit thin for a table if you are going to be spending a good chunk of money on it, and fabricating your own table is a great 3rd or 4th project, do something like building a welding cart first and some other stuff before welding something that requires good strength and alignment more. A 2x3 or 2x4 sheet of 1/4 or 5/8 will probably run you $200-350.

    You probably don't need a boat load of holes like the Certiflat, you can always drill and tap holes in a flat sheet when you need them, and no holes will open up the ability to cut in features you might learn you want (odd shapes, slots, etc) It would be best to try and find something as flat as possible, that's one huge bonus the Ceritflat has, a lot of stuff you won't need it but if you are getting into project that requires high precision it will be crucial. Sometimes I see old unused surface plates on CL for cheap and think about turning one into a precision welding table, but also think its sort of sad to muck up a nice old plate.

    Fireball Tool had a table system that looked really nice (modular 24x12 3/4" plates), but it has been out of stock for like a year now. Their youtube also has a video constructing a table out of multiple 12x12 plates with 3 point supports which you can adjust for high level of precision, this is a pretty interesting approach, and it will make material handling much easier if you are having to assemble this in a basement for example. They also offer plans for that table but for some reason they are not available either.
    Last edited by repoman; 07-06-2021, 10:29 AM.

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  • epicfail48
    replied
    The more i think it over, the more i like the idea of the certiflat tables. Ive got a few RFQs in with local suppliers to find out how much a piece of 1/2" plate would cost, if its cheaper than the 2'x4' certiflat ill go that route, if not, certiflat it is. Eventually, anyways, still have to decide to spend the money

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  • QSIMDO
    replied
    After years with a 4'x8'x.75" road plate on legs I was faced with moving it and soul searched enough to admit I
    never used the whole table.
    After reducing the size of that at least twice I finally got rid of it for a Stronghand Fixturepoint table and love it.

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  • fjk
    replied
    Originally posted by alanganes View Post
    I don't have a photo handy, but I made mine using a cast steel storm drain cover,
    Super idea!

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  • alanganes
    replied
    I don't have a photo handy, but I made mine using a cast steel storm drain cover, the type that is about 2 feet square with square holes in it. Got it from a friend who worked for a local DPW, he said they had some missing the "rings" they mount in so were essentially scrap.

    I made some legs out of steel water pipe and other junk I had around. It's heavy but solid as can be, great for when you need to beat some metal thing into submission. It's reasonably flat though not "precision" flat. I have a heavy vise on one corner and the table on wheels so I can roll it out into the driveway when I am doing any MIG or stick welding as I don't want to burn the place down from the sparks of fill the house with smoke.

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  • Tungsten dipper
    replied
    The assembly was fun!! You will have to have lots of clamps. It started out as a 1/4" 3ft. X 4ft. top. Was it flat? No. Turns out that my table was the last piece on the roll and had a crown in it; (after welding the braces on it) so I called company and ordered another 3/16 top. I shimmed out the wrap by screwing the new top down. This way I can always adjust the flatness. Whats amazing, all those holes in the new top alined perfectly, with the holes in the first top! Would I buy another one? YOU BET! Cert-a-flat is a great company and great to work with! One of the most used, best things in my shop! I wish it was 3 times bigger and had a shop 3 times bigger...
    Made lots of clamps using Harbor Freight clamps. One thing I would suggest is to add some wheels on it.
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