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For what its worth - My welders in order.

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  • For what its worth - My welders in order.

    My welders in order.

    ** Oxy Acetylene torch. An old farm mechanic taught me to patch muffler skins with clothes hangers using a cutting head. He wanted me to learn to control the heat with whatever I had. No ****. Ok it looks like ****, but it works. I was amazed. The secret was just barely enough heat to melt the metal and continuous small circles to control heat input. I welded a lot of stuff with old clothes hangers and a torch when I was younger.

    ** Lincoln Tombstone AC only. Have run up against duty cycle when welding around 6in well casing. Does half diameter well, and needs to cool down. (it keeps welding just goes to ****.) Runs 3/32 run pretty decently. Hits duty cycle pretty quick with 1/8 inch.

    ** Harbor Freight old blue box "MIG." Ran up against duty cycle striking an arc. Ok not quite, but close. Added external cooling fan and could weld about 3/4in bead on 1/8in. Did a lot of work with it 3/4 inch at a time. (Gave it away not to long ago to a local kid. Not sure if I did him a favor or not. LOL) Worst welder I've ever used.

    ** Miller 212 dual stinger dual bottle welded aluminum with the spool gun ok. 1/8-5/16 easily. Thinner possible, and thicker with preheat. MIG welded steel for ****. Ran it with flux core for several years figuring I just sucked at MIG welding. One day I decided to tear it apart from end to end and fix it or destroy it because of how many people who claimed MIG was to easy. That's when I realized the original factory gas diffuser had no holes. Miller sent me a nice little consumables kit when I posted the pictures on their web forums. LOL. MIG welds pretty good now.

    ** Lincoln ProCore (box store welder). Ok for a cheap 120V flux core only rig. Will run about 2 inches of bead on 1/8 in cold then the arc starts to destabilize. I found when I need to use it I just stop welding every 1-1/2 inch and work on something else. The first 1-1/2 inch does go on good though.

    ** AHP 200(xfgqpty-whatever). First weld was autogenous stainless pin in hole. Worked ok given I didn't know what I was doing. To many settings to figure out. I have to spend 20-30 minutes on the Internet every time I try to use it. Recently did a filler weld and an autogenous weld on an aluminum low pressure vessel (DIY condensate tank on an air dryer.) The autogenous looked great and leaked. The filler weld looked like crap and didn't leak. I could have done the weld with my spool gun on the Miller just as well I think and certainly faster. Haven't really used it as much as I thought I would.

    None have "failed" but I do not do all that much fabricating. Maybe 2 semi serious projects a year. Maybe power on one of them once or twice a month for a small job. The Harbor Freight and the ProCore are the only ones I ever used "commercially." Being able to run them anywhere on a heavy extension cord made them the easiest and fastest many times. Usually small stuff like gate handles and strike boxes when I was doing communication and access control work. Grinder and paint hides a whole host of sins.

    My favorite now that it actually works like its supposed to is the Miller 212. Well I always liked it for aluminum with the spool gun once I started to pick up the knack.

    ***********************

    The first welder I ever used looked like a broken battery charger had a baby with a busted open robot running whatever kind of rod my grandfather handed me welding rusted off t-posts blowing through rust, dirt and paint.

    I think the second was O/A with that farm mechanic I talked about and later my own O/A rig.

    Third, and for a long time my favorite was a gas engine powered Hobart DC welder generator stick welder. It burned rod so easy it felt like cheating. I think my dad still has it, but it hasn't run in years.

    My dad had an AC cracker box too, but we both hated it. Him more than me I think. I think the one I have works better, but its been a few years since I used it. Maybe that's just failing memory.

    I do have a Miller piggy back TIG that is supposed to run off an AC or DC stick welder, but I never was able to get it to run for the thin stuff I wanted it for. Its got a weird relay contactor "thing" for a HF start generator that works for about ten starts after you clean and polish it before it needs to be done again. I never succeeded in welding anything with it. For thicker stuff MIG or STICK are so much easier and faster for me. Its on my scrap pile for a good going through for recycling some day.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  • #2
    i have welded

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    • #3
      i have welded a front end up with nothing but cat hangers and a small plumbers torch........that was almost 50 years ago....have learned alot sense then.....no more coat hanger rod that was for a VW

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      • #4
        Originally posted by chevy3755 View Post
        i have welded a front end up with nothing but cat hangers and a small plumbers torch........that was almost 50 years ago....have learned alot sense then.....no more coat hanger rod that was for a VW
        I have to assume you were using something like a turbo torch that gets hot enough for silphous.
        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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        • #5
          Interesting that the "tombstone" DC'd out. I've never used one, but was thinking of getting one because everyone says they are indestructible and just work. Never heard of a D/C problem with them.

          I've seen D/C issues with little flux core stuff, like the time my boss wanted me to weld some big 1/4" plate together with his 90A Lincoln flux core (He knew I had done a welding course).... It D/C'd out just as the puddle got established. And when it shut down, even the cooling fan quit..... 🙄

          I thought the tombstones were made for heavier duty stuff. 'Sposed to have something like 200A.
          3313 5160 4357 4344 3174 9120

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Everything not impossible is compulsory

          Birds are NOT real, they are spying on you

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          • #6
            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
            Interesting that the "tombstone" DC'd out. I've never used one, but was thinking of getting one because everyone says they are indestructible and just work. Never heard of a D/C problem with them.

            I've seen D/C issues with little flux core stuff, like the time my boss wanted me to weld some big 1/4" plate together with his 90A Lincoln flux core (He knew I had done a welding course).... It D/C'd out just as the puddle got established. And when it shut down, even the cooling fan quit..... 🙄

            I thought the tombstones were made for heavier duty stuff. 'Sposed to have something like 200A.
            Took me a moment. Duty Cycle. No. It kept welding, the arc just destabilized and it welded like crap. Let cool down and all was good again.
            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hmmm..... If the problem came on suddenly might have a bad connection. If t came on slowly, the resistance of all the wire etc increases with heat, so maybe it was developing higher resistance internally, and you'd need to compensate with a shorter arc (until you run out of room).
              3313 5160 4357 4344 3174 9120

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Everything not impossible is compulsory

              Birds are NOT real, they are spying on you

              Comment


              • #8
                I bought one of the AHP tig 200 welders last year. I have been very pleased with it. Yes there are a lot of knobs/settings but not a big deal at all once you do the initial learning. I am just a hobby guy but do a fair amount of welding each year. I also have oxy/acelylene, a miller 180 mig , a acetylene turbo torch with B tank, and a harbor freight plasma cutter. The oxy/acetylene almost never gets used anymore, just for big heating or big cutting needs beyond what the plasma can handle . I used to have a Lincoln tombstone which worked well and I had no complaints at all.

                I really enjoy using the AHP tig the most. The miller mig is my general purpose go-to welder (has the spoolgun but it never gets used due to the TIG being preferred). Although I have not done it, or had the need, the AHP TIG doubles up as a AC/DC stick welder if ever needed.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
                  Although I have not done it, or had the need, the AHP TIG doubles up as a AC/DC stick welder if ever needed.
                  Yeah, that was one of the extras for me on the AHPTIG200(dsfgs;dfgsjdf). DC stick capability. Its been a few decades since I ran DC stick, but I seem to recall it was so easy. Maybe because somebody else setup the machine for me. The thing is since I got the 212 running GMAW steel properly I just haven't needed it. The latest project was a 3 point multi hitch for the tractor to make moving trailers easier. Receiver draw tube on the bottom with 3 way ball drawbar, and 5/16 ball on the top for goosenecks. I can pick it up and set it in the quick hitch fairly easily. I was concerned about those false MIG welds I've heard about, but I got great welds. Maybe I need to weld something thicker just so I can break out the sticks... well after I recondition them in the toaster oven. LOL.

                  *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have the HF 220 volt black and white MIG with gas (I think it's discontinued), which works surprisingly well, and an ancient Craftsman (I think it's a Century) buzz box the previous owner added long leads to. It's a workhorse. Both lost the chintzy OEM ground clamps when new, and the Craftsman has a much better than stock stinger. Seriously, why do so many welders use lousy ground clamps?

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