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Pulsed Welding? Whuzzat?

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  • #16
    You know I never really put it together before, but years ago I found I could weld thinner steel like pickup beds and motorcycle fenders by laying down a spot of bead, and waiting for the red glow to almost fade out before overlapping the next spot of bead. Probably 1/2 to 3/4 second let off and just long enough on to put down a solid spot of material. I was even able to do that with flux core using my old POS HF welder.

    I guess I was doing a very rudimentary manual pulse weld. LOL.

    I don't recall much distortion either. It's been maybe 14 years since the last time I used the method, but I'm still driving the truck. Patched the hole from a through bed gooseneck hitch.

    Funny part:. I've since mounted rails in the truck bed for a gooseneck plate or fifth wheel.
    Last edited by Bob La Londe; 11-23-2021, 01:26 PM.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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    • #17
      Just saw an ad. "Jattus TIG Perfect 2.0" $330. You attach inline to your foot pedal or finger switch. You tell them what welder you have, and they send the appropriate connectors. Saw a Youtube with a demonstration.

      Anyone out there had any experience with the Chinese pulsers? You can get them as cheaply as $40. (but can you trust them?)

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
        You know I never really put it together before, but years ago I found I could weld thinner steel like pickup beds and motorcycle fenders by laying down a spot of bead, and waiting for the red glow to almost fade out before overlapping the next spot of bead. Probably 1/2 to 3/4 second let off and just long enough on to put down a solid spot of material. I was even able to do that with flux core using my old POS HF welder.

        I guess I was doing a very rudimentary manual pulse weld. LOL.

        I don't recall much distortion either. It's been maybe 14 years since the last time I used the method, but I'm still driving the truck. Patched the hole from a through bed gooseneck hitch.

        Funny part:. I've since mounted rails in the truck bed for a gooseneck plate or fifth wheel.
        I have done this repairing a cracked muffler. It's easier with MIG than TIG because metal addition is automatic and instantaneous.
        It's all mind over matter.
        If you don't mind, it don't matter.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by John Buffum View Post
          I was right.

          Same box, different color, on Aliexpress.
          https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005...19181501%22%7D

          Didn't find anything for Mig.
          Interesting and cheap enough. I wonder if an English face-plate is available.
          This quote from the description caught my eye: "Our product is not suitable, thank you. There is no such machine on the market at present. "
          It's all mind over matter.
          If you don't mind, it don't matter.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by MrWhoopee View Post

            I have done this repairing a cracked muffler. It's easier with MIG than TIG because metal addition is automatic and instantaneous.
            Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
            You know I never really put it together before, but years ago I found I could weld thinner steel like pickup beds and motorcycle fenders by laying down a spot of bead, and waiting for the red glow to almost fade out before overlapping the next spot of bead. Probably 1/2 to 3/4 second let off and just long enough on to put down a solid spot of material.
            With MIG, there is an old saying, tack tack tack can lead to crack crack crack.

            Im not saying in these situations it will happen but do some research on it.

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            • #21
              I did a little experimenting with the pulse functions on my AHP AlphaTIG yesterday. Just a couple of 16 ga. S/S coupons butted together and fused without filler. For a first time, I'm quite pleased. The heat affected zone was small and remained that way, no appreciable warpage and there was almost no "sugaring" on the back side. Definitely worth exploring further.
              It's all mind over matter.
              If you don't mind, it don't matter.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by oxford View Post



                With MIG, there is an old saying, tack tack tack can lead to crack crack crack.

                Im not saying in these situations it will happen but do some research on it.
                I've always heard that starts and stops are the bad points in mig welds, and I always knew that this was nothing but a series of starts and stops, but I've done it many times in the past and never had a fail. I don't think this is really a tac in that respect. You don't let it get cold when doing this. You just let the red glow start to fade. That's why I described it that way in the first post. For it to work right you kind of have to get a rhythm going. I found that it was quite easy if you have a really fast Auto dark welding helmet and more difficult to do if your welding helmet resets to clear too slowly. Anyway I suspect if the pickup bed, which is the last repair I did this way that I can remember, fails I'll notice it. There will be a big square hole in the bed. If that happens while I still own the truck I'll let you know.

                As a side note, if your auto dark helmet is too slow it's better to use a fixed filter helmet.
                *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Found another offering. Older. Japanese?
                  https://www.ebay.com/itm/124568381188
                  MrWhoopee. Great catch! So, the Chinese are selling boxes that sit and do nothing! Sounds like US politics. "If your requirements are: no color change, no polishing, no deformation at all, no temperature touch and no argon after welding, customers with the above requirements should be careful to buy, this kind of product is not suitable, thank you.There is no such machine on the market at present." Direct copy.

                  So far, the Jattus TIG Perfect 2.0 is close, but not really what I wanted. $330.

                  If, one day, I have the need for this, it would seem cheepa to buy a whole new welder, either an AHP, an Eastwood, an Everlast, or another good brand. BUT that would mean selling what I have. I guess it's a character flaw, but I'd rather have a wisdom tooth pulled.
                  Last edited by John Buffum; 11-25-2021, 01:17 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by MrWhoopee View Post
                    Pulse is useful for welding thin materials by controlling the amount of heat input. They are even making dedicated pulse welders (cold welder?).
                    NOT the same thing, by any means. A "cold welder" is a single discharge per actuation and is mostly a cheapo TIG with a one-shot circuit on the control input. Someone did a youtube recently debunking them as being complete nonsense because most videos are sped up and the material actually gets rather hot. They're not magic at all.

                    A pulser on a conventional TIG, however is a useful thing. I don't use mine very often, unless I'm doing TIG brazing because it helps time the rod to prevent a cold joint.

                    On my OG ~2003 Syncrowave 180SD (same as Econotig in most senses), the Miller PC-600 pulser unit was a $500+ add-on that got discontinued and was exceedingly hard to find. It plugged into the foot pedal plug and the foot pedal plugged into it. It was an epic score to find one new in box locally and it took me almost a decade to get it. I was rather disappointed to see how fussy it was to use and it never got much usage in the end.

                    TLDR; a real pulser control on a TIG is handy but not mandatory if you're used to living without it.
                    -paul

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