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"Home Shop Welding 101"

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  • torker
    replied
    JR...Geez.. I almost missed that! You brought up one of the most important things in welding. "Short arc length"! It all matters.. you get the torch, tunsten, rod..wire..whatever too far away and it will "superheat" the metal all around it. This makes it very hard to manage a puddle.
    This is especially true with stick...uphand is the worst. You pull a long arc going uphill and you are in trouble.
    You also mentioned "keyhole"...the most important thing in open groove welding. You have to strive to keep the keyhole consistant as you weld and keep it centered. Feeding the rod into a keyhole consistantly only comes with practice.
    A little trick here... when doing a 6010 root...always look at the end of your rod...see that the flux is centered. If it's not...if it's thinner on one side...you will have big trouble running the root in even. When testing we always pick perfect rods to run in the root.

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  • torker
    replied
    Steve...7024 lays in like puddin...a pure and clean weld... even better with DC-(If you want the "glassy look").
    I still use it a lot for outdoor welding in the flat and horizontal. Beauty is.. it's not lowhy so you don't need an oven.
    BTW.. need an oven? You can buy the small portables like I use for about $150 Cnd.
    JR...The more I get into this the more I think the "tricks" could prevail. There's lots of regular info out there but not much in the way of tricks that could help a HSM guy (my dirtbike header pipe deal is an example.)
    I also don't agree that tig isn't in the realm of the HSM guy... a lot of people own tig machines now.

    Leave a comment:


  • doctor demo
    replied
    Originally posted by torker
    SD..good resource there. Notice "6013 rod...should ONLY be used to weld new clean sheet steel".
    You welding supply store... We have two in town...maybe a total of 8 employees. Not ONE of them knows how to weld. How can they REALLY tell you which rod to use?
    My guys..at Praxair..they'd have sold you a box of 7024 and a box of 6010..
    Tight budget??? Come on.. a box of 7024 costs about $15. You'd thank me after you used it.
    Russ
    Russ, I get 6010, or 6011, or 7018, but I don't think I have ever used 7024.
    So what benefit is 7024 over the others?

    steve

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    I would like to hear about the various "tricks" to welding. And I know, they aren't really tricks, just normal procedures to welding. But sometimes the books talk about how to do something but dont say why. Im a "why" kinda guy. Cause once I know the why it sticks in my head, it then makes sense to me.

    I took some courses at our local community college that was taught by Jack D. Compton (AWS Director district 21). He was the only instructor. Brilliant guy and had a sincere caring for the guys enrolled to get them AWS certified for structural steel welding (stick), to help them get a job.

    Anyway, I was one of ten other guys that were not interested in getting a cert for stick. I wanted to learn to TIG weld. Not to put him or the course down but us ten were kinda the red headed step children, the real focus was on the fifteen other guys who were there to learn a trade and I get that. Employment for our kids is number one.

    So this class started us "redheads" off with O/A as many do. I hated it, at first. Then realized this needs to be taught first. With O/A you can go much slower and learn how to control the weld puddle and actually see it and manipulate it while not blowing it all out like a tig might do for the beginner.

    I went through many lil pieces of sheet metal (which we sheared our selves) before he would even talk about TIG. Had to pass all the coupon tests for that, various joints is all.

    But I digress LOL My point with the tricks was. Not really a trick but I didnt get it till he came by my booth and showed me. I was doing butt joints on 18ga. I was burning the stuff up. Big ol 1/4" holes everywhere. I was frustrated, I thought I was applying too much heat so what did I do, back the flame away. WRONG!!. I just didn't know. So, after he showed me when its getting too hot move the tip in closer. Sure enough, with the flame going through the keyhole it would put the heat to the other side, not on top the metal. And really, as trivial as it sounds that lil "trick" got me more motivated cause I wasnt burning metal anymore, I was actually welding. Made a HUGE difference for me..

    So.. My need for tricks is paramount really.. And again, prolly not tricks, just the standard for welding but I don't get it alot of the time till its explained by a person.. JR

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  • torker
    replied
    SD..good resource there. Notice "6013 rod...should ONLY be used to weld new clean sheet steel".
    You welding supply store... We have two in town...maybe a total of 8 employees. Not ONE of them knows how to weld. How can they REALLY tell you which rod to use?
    My guys..at Praxair..they'd have sold you a box of 7024 and a box of 6010..
    Dickey... for what you are doing.. the rod will work. Not my choice but it'll work as long as no ones safety is at risk. If you find any BB's(big slag inclusions) in a weld.. grind it out and redo it.
    Also..watch that the puddle with 6013 flows out and fuses on the sides.
    For thicker stuff...watch the same thing plus!
    You should maybe do some bend tests on coupons to see if your work will stand up. Even clamping a 1 1/2" wide coupon in a vise and banging it over with a hammer will tell you if your welds are ok. If they fall apart...you got troubles.
    Tight budget??? Come on.. a box of 7024 costs about $15. You'd thank me after you used it.
    Russ

    Leave a comment:


  • Smokedaddy
    replied
    You might find this helpful (you need to read all of it too).

    http://www.thefabricator.com/ArcWeld...le.cfm?ID=1674

    -SD:

    Leave a comment:


  • DICKEYBIRD
    replied
    Okay, okay....back to the original topic you gurus. That's hardly HSM welding. Sure is purty though.

    My neophyte question for you grizzled veterans is about 6013 rods. I bartered for an inoperative Century 220v AC-DC, 230 amp max AC, 140 DC welder. Once I fixed the squeeze & slide amperage adjuster it seems to work fine. I asked the guy at the welding store what a good all around rod for general purpose home shop Mr Fixit projects would be and he recommended 6013. I bought a box each of 1/16", 3/32" and 1/8" a year ago. I noticed in the other recent welding thread that 6013's were poo-poo'd. My hobby budget is pretty limited so I'm stuck with using them though.

    My welding jobs are fairly infrequent and usually consist of tacking 1/16" mild steel sheet, solidly welding 1/8" to 5/16" mild steel brackets with the occasional 3/8" x 1 1/2" bar and some misc. angle iron & tubing. You guys have any general tips on how best to use the 6013's? This is my 1st experience with DC and so far I like it.

    Leave a comment:


  • torker
    replied
    SD...LOL! Yup..that's a tough test if it's tig all the way out... and 6G. I had to learn how to tig left handed for that test... right on one side..lefthand on the other. I watch some guys try to do it all right handed...it's pretty gnarly looking.
    Looks like nice tig work there from what I can see. I don't miss that..tiggin 6G small dia pipe. Can't bend too good for that anymore. Then in the real world they put the damm pipe right up close to a wall or a foot off the floor..makes it even nicer
    Russ

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  • Smokedaddy
    replied
    Originally posted by torker
    SD... you guys building cannons?
    Grin,

    The coupons in the images (2 inch) are for just one of our certification test. The 1 inch plate test, all 2 welding positions, was for embeds certification for PaloVerde nuke.

    http://www.pbase.com/smokedaddy/image/100672204

    The one below is TIG all the way out in a 6G position, 45 degree (some call it a Arkansas bell hole) and a different certification. Of coures there are others, TIG stringer with 7018 filler and cap, 2 inch, 12 inch etc. Pretty tough test in my opinion.

    http://www.pbase.com/smokedaddy/image/100745924

    The one below is a 2 inch, 6G, TIG stringer and low high out (7018), ready to be sent out for xray.

    http://www.pbase.com/smokedaddy/image/100745929

    We go through a butt-load of large and small bore pipe all the time. We have 40 weld booths. Of course we re-use the coupons as much as possible (cut and re-bevel etc.).

    http://www.pbase.com/smokedaddy/image/100745932

    -SD:

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    And???

    Originally posted by lazlo
    Oh, that's bloody brilliant Russ!!!

    Please do post more of the back-purging setup for welding Ti!
    Colonic irrigation?

    Enema?

    Touch ya toes!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • lazlo
    replied
    Originally posted by torker
    Need "coupon" material... for free??? Think outside the box......Go to the local dirtbike dealer. Most of the new fourstrokes have Ti header pipes (that's what I was supposed to repair). These get wrecked on a regular basis and thrown in the garbage.
    Oh, that's bloody brilliant Russ!!!

    Please do post more of the back-purging setup for welding Ti!

    Leave a comment:


  • lazlo
    replied
    Originally posted by TexasTurnado
    I took the advanced class here, but only talked about Ti.
    At Austin Community College, the multi-process welding class is in the continuing education program, but the advanced classes are intended for guys getting their welding certs, so they're in the for-credit college. So I had to apply for ACC, which is amusing since I have two Master's Degrees, so they wanted my graduate transcripts from Virginia Tech and the Naval Postgraduate School

    In any event, as I told Mike (MickeyD), ACC canceled the evening session of the Fall Advanced TIG class (that I was signed-up for) The daytime session is 10:40 - 1:40 Tu Thu, so I could conceivable take a long lunch, but then I'd be coming back to Nvidia stinking of sweat and smoke.

    So it looks like I'm going to have to wait 'till the Spring session.

    ACC also added a welding special topics class called "Toolmaking" that got me all excited -- I was hoping it was specialty HSS welding for tool and die work. But when I asked my welding instructor about it, he said it was making blacksmithing tools. Doh!

    By the way, ACC has a fantastic Blacksmithing program if anyone's interested. I haven't taken any of the classes, but the forge room adjoins the welding area, and I love watching those guys work!

    BTW, I tried to PM you, but got an error saying you already had too many
    Sorry about that -- I got a ton of PM about the bearing charts I posted. All cleared up now.

    Leave a comment:


  • torker
    replied
    Sorry guys! The Ti job never showed up. Anyway.. want to weld Titainium?
    Need "coupon" material... for free??? Think outside the box......Go to the local dirtbike dealer. Most of the new fourstrokes have Ti header pipes (that's what I was supposed to repair). These get wrecked on a regular basis and thrown in the garbage.
    I get them to save them for me. I use a zip wheel to cut them into strips that I use for filler. Be careful... don't use any kind of alu oxide wheel to grind the strips down...it can contaminate the strips.
    SD... you guys building cannons?

    Leave a comment:


  • TexasTurnado
    replied
    Originally posted by lazlo
    Yeah, we TIG welded the coke can and the razor blades in the multi-process welding class at ACC. It helps a lot if you use the filler rod to shield the thin material. The Advanced TIG class goes into exotics like Titanium.

    To be honest, I don't think learning TIG would have been cost-effective if I had to pay for all the aluminum, steel, and stainless coupons, but maybe I'm a slow learner
    At that time (early 90's) aluminum wasn't all that expensive, but I loved to work with the SS and used a bunch. Maybe it was those nice colors when you get it right I really enjoy the TIG welding, and use it almost exclusively. MIG was the one I never could get to like - I thought it was harder than TIG, especially to get enough penetration. Too many welds looked great, but were just sitting on the base metal.

    I took the advanced class here, but only talked about Ti. Also took the next class, which was even more advanced topics, and you were required to select a project of your own choosing, so I did an all aluminum o/a cart with rod storage tubes. Still have it and have my set in it.

    BTW, I tried to PM you, but got an error saying you already had too many

    Leave a comment:


  • Smokedaddy
    replied
    Downhill 7018 ... humm ... anyway, here are a few test coupons we use, 100 percent xray of course and not prepped yet and our plate test.

    http://www.pbase.com/smokedaddy/image/100672204

    -SD:

    Leave a comment:

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