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"Home Shop Welding 101"

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  • #46
    Guys! This is heading towards becoming a website. There's no way this will work as is. It'll just turn into a jumbled up mess.
    I'm still looking for ideas. Seems pointless to just spew out what has already been written time and time again. Contrary to what some may think.. I see a lot of value in doing a "Mythbuster" section. THAT has not been done before.
    If you think about it... the home guy is going to create a lot of problems for himself. I think it's worthwhile finding out "why or why not".
    Still just kickin things around...like Bill said "creating a monster" isn't what I have time for.
    I need to work on better pic taking skills etc.
    BTW... I don't mind helping out thru PM's. I'm already doing that with a few guys.
    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by Carld
      Russ, may I suggest that the instruction part be a NO COMMENT thread. If you allow posts there will be much arguing about how and why your doing it. Have a seperate thread for comments. You know this is going to turn into a man eating Bear don't you.

      Like you, I have used the cutting torch head to weld as well as the wrong size tip. When your in a hurry, your in a hurry and it works.

      I use 6013 'cause I like the way it flows and was not aware of the brittle aspect. I also like 7018 rods and use them for strength welds.

      When I was a teenager in the late '50's my uncle set me to cutting old engines to scrap out. I had to learn how to cut cast iron with a O/A torch and it's not easy and I probably can't do it now as it takes a lot of practice.

      I hope you can turn this into a good instruction thread without comments.
      Carl...see my post about the website. Cutting cast... it helps if you feed a welding rod into the flame.
      Lots of guys use 6013...just be careful what for.
      I worked with a welding engineer for 7 months a few years back. He had incredible knowledge... but he sucked at welding. LOL! He ran 6013 way more than he should have... he even admitted it. It was just easier for him.
      I have tools I don't even know I own...

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      • #48
        Originally posted by torker
        Nick..where did I say "weld pool" anywhere on this thread??? I re-read all my posts and don't see it.(That one torch weld WAS a weld pool tho)
        And I didn't realize you where from the UK(your spelling of oxidising and carburising) (My spelling would be oxidizing and carburizing)
        I agree with the video...so you gonna lend me you equipment?
        What's the "point"?
        This is a "Homeshop" welding deal. Trying to think outside the box here... some of the things a homeshop guy would try.
        How many times have you read about guys welding with a cutting torch? I have... in fact I've done it a few times in emergency situations. However.. I've never taken the time to test the results.
        The "too large" of a tip... Why not? This is a very real homeshop or otherwise reality. Gotta weld on Sunday...no welding supply open...
        And you should read the thread...right now I'm compiling any ideas and things I'm doing to get an idea where this will go.
        I threw in the pics to break up the boredom...this is NOT how I would start out the real thread...if you read it you would see I've already said so.
        Now please...where did I say "weld pool" in this thread...
        Russ
        So take it as ideas then

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        • #49
          Originally posted by NickH
          So take it as ideas then
          I already did!
          I have tools I don't even know I own...

          Comment


          • #50
            One possible way to lay this out is one example at a time. IE show a welding job; "repair to a broken wyx stuck half way up pritchet canyon trail", etc.. the welding process chosen, why, procedure, some settings and photos of the area before, during prep, and after. If you try to cover all things you have a text book, if the examples are situational a home shop welder can find a similar situation and give it a try. Many of us have textbooks, how about real examples later organized somehow to search by process or base metals or working conditions? The entry about cutting cast iron while feeding a little 6013 filler is a perfect example of one entry. knock off the flux? does the filler go at the leading edge of the cut? a little elaboration and a title on the entry and you have it. Kind of like the book "machine shop trade secrets" but for welding.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by rdesign
              One possible way to lay this out is one example at a time. IE show a welding job; "repair to a broken wyx stuck half way up pritchet canyon trail", etc.. the welding process chosen, why, procedure, some settings and photos of the area before, during prep, and after. If you try to cover all things you have a text book, if the examples are situational a home shop welder can find a similar situation and give it a try. Many of us have textbooks, how about real examples later organized somehow to search by process or base metals or working conditions? The entry about cutting cast iron while feeding a little 6013 filler is a perfect example of one entry. knock off the flux? does the filler go at the leading edge of the cut? a little elaboration and a title on the entry and you have it. Kind of like the book "machine shop trade secrets" but for welding.
              Ya..that's kind of the stuff I was thinking. BTW.. I just use RG45 or you could use coathangers....lol!
              I have tools I don't even know I own...

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Your Old Dog
                I don't think I like this idea.

                What the hell can I use for an excuse for my news photographer type welds if I'm supposed to know how to do it?

                Torker I got oxy/acet, mig and AC/DC stick welder. Start with one of them as TIG ain't on my radar anytime soon !!
                second that! I've got MIG & AC/DC. Maybe you should go in order of ease of entry, starting with the cheapest. Tig would be last, no?
                Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by gellfex
                  Maybe you should go in order of ease of entry, starting with the cheapest. Tig would be last, no?
                  TIG's also the hardest, by far. In my multi-process welding class we did oxy first, then stick, then MIG (which is the easiest, by far) and then TIG. I'm told that's pretty standard.

                  But I understand where Russ is coming from -- puddle management and tempo on TIG is very similar to Oxy, you just don't have a foot pedal to modulate the heat of the torch.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #54
                    Well, the offer still stands to make it into some web pages and put it on line Russ. But, you better have it pretty well formatted the way you want because I'm not going to take any of the blame for the content.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Evan
                      Well, the offer still stands to make it into some web pages and put it on line Russ.
                      My offer still stands to host it, if Evan will WebMaster it -- I've got a Gigabyte of web server space and 60 GB of bandwidth parked on a web site that's currently unused...
                      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        The welding with a cutting torch, and in the spirit of homeshopping, reminded me of a dodge Ive used a few times, cutting with a welding torch. Its not very neat, but if you turn up the oxy to a very oxidising flame you can cut thin sheet quite sucessfully which does save you some time when your wedged under a car and that little bracket is in the way....

                        Dave
                        Just south of Sudspumpwater UK

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                        • #57
                          Hola! I need time to get some stuff together.... and still getting good ideas from here.
                          Today is crazy.. got a welding job in a few hours ago. Still haven't touched it. There's three hornet nests in and around the old trailer the guy drug in for me to do some work on. He got the crap stung out of himself here. I ran out of hi pressure wasp spray so I'm waiting til the missus brings home some more.
                          I'd fry the little buggers out with the Tiger torch but this trailer is full of diesel fuel and other assorted flammables.
                          That and playing the "waiting games" all day trying to pick up my equipment. Geez.. the things you gotta do when you break yer gurl!
                          I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                          • #58
                            If George would set up a welding forum, there could be a few stickies, say one each for O/A, MIG, TIG, Which method, and other methods.

                            Welding-wise, I hope to be a real noob. I've got limited shop size and funds, not to mention nosey neighbours, and I'd like to do some welding, but the list of things I want to do seem to suggest I need to start on all the techniques at once. Like small aluminium for bike cases, 1/4 inch steel plate and angle for frames, cast iron for fixing broken tailstock castings, brazing for bike and other frames etc.

                            So starting off with a good description of what each type of kit and technique will do would be really helpful. And the basic science/engineering reasons why one piece of kit can't/won't do two jobs. Where must I keep bottles ? Are rods called the same thing in the UK as in the states ? Where is it safe to weld ? Ventilation requirements etc.

                            Strength to your elbow torker. The whole project sounds brilliant. Am looking forward to it.
                            Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

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                            • #59
                              torker, I'm with you on O/A to TIG. Untill I got my TIG I didn't realize how much they have in common. Stick and MIG are in many ways the same.

                              ROFLMAO, if you heat a piece up with a welding tip and when it's all good and red then turn more oxy to the flame it will cut the piece like a cutting torch. That is, if your a smooth operator.
                              It's only ink and paper

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Carld

                                ROFLMAO, if you heat a piece up with a welding tip and when it's all good and red then turn more oxy to the flame it will cut the piece like a cutting torch. That is, if your a smooth operator.
                                Carl.. LOL! another one I've never heard of..it makes sense tho.
                                It's still about 100* in my shop.. aint doing any gas welding tonite..
                                Hot spell is supposed to be over in a day or two.
                                I have tools I don't even know I own...

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