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  • HSS
    replied
    Fixed

    Well, the breaker fixed the problem. Turning steel again with no problems. Now, if I can just stay off this computer long enough to get something done in the shop. Cold as a witches tit out there now. I think I'll stay in tonite.

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  • HSS
    replied
    Tight, but it fit

    Well, I took off from work long enough this morning to remove the old fuse holder and install the circuit breaker. Turned some teflon to use as a bushing in the fuse holder hole so that the breaker would tighten up. Everything is working good so far. But then I haven't gone back to turning steel yet either. We'll see.....

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  • HSS
    replied
    Reg,
    My motor and controller are fine but the fuse holder is so hot after just a little turning that you can't hold on to it. The last fuse I changed in it, had the solder melted out of the end of the fuse. I talked to Dave @ Smithy and he said I could replace the fuse with a circuit breaker of the same amp rating. The only problem with that is the space, where the fuse is now, is very cramped. I figure I might make a box for the breaker and place it over the existing fuse locaton and orient it so that the breaker is pointing up instead of out. We'll see....
    Pat

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  • reggeee
    replied
    hey Pat

    i blew fuses at the beginning but it was because my motor was dying and i didn't know it. Now that smithy sent me a new motor, no problems. my circuit breaker in my shop is 20 amp.

    Leave a comment:


  • HSS
    replied
    Well, about to fry another fuse, however I did find out I'm not blowing fuses, I'm melting the durn things. The fuse holder gets so hot you can't hold on to it. I was turning a steel alignment bushing last night and smelled something burning and saw smoke coming out of the reverse switch cover. Shut it down until I get with Smithy. I bought a 20 amp circuit breaker to replace the fuse, but it is awfully tight in that control box. I may extend the fuse wires and mount a box for the breaker outside the control box. Oh well, I guess I'll stay in and watch tv tonite.
    Pat

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  • HSS
    replied
    Depth of cut may not be constant on each Granite 1324 because your limiting factor will be the motor fuse located beneath the start/stop buttons. I machine mostly steel and take pretty aggressive cuts and have gone thru all the fuses sent with the machine. I had to go into town and buy another box of fuses Sunday. Each time I have blown a fuse, there was no fore warning from the motor, no change in sound, it just stopped running. Then I lighten up on the cut a little. I guess I might call that roughing rush.
    Just a little advice, buy a box of spare fuses when you can.
    Last edited by HSS; 11-28-2008, 10:07 AM.

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  • reggeee
    replied
    How deep?

    How deep of a cut can i expect to take in aluminium with a 1324 granite using an indexable tool? I've been taking .030 quite easily but i don't really know what i'm doing yet.

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  • Corm
    replied
    Originally posted by reggeee
    Do they have lathe rehab anywhere so i can kick this expensive habit before it starts??
    Nope, too late for you now! You're hooked along with the rest of us!

    Leave a comment:


  • reggeee
    replied
    Thanks Corm. it makes perfect sense to me now. I will by a set of collets asap. Do they have lathe rehab anywhere so i can kick this expensive habit before it starts??

    Leave a comment:


  • reggeee
    replied
    great links!!!

    Smiller....thanks so much for pointing me in the right direction. just watched the first one at MIT. Fantastic. really helped. The DVD's are expensive, but not as expensive as breaking my machine or hurting myself doing something dumb. They'll be a good xmas gift for myself. thanks again

    Leave a comment:


  • Corm
    replied
    Originally posted by reggeee
    So collets are basically meant for milling?
    No, that isn't totally true....

    Collets are handy in a lathe if you have a lot of small stuff to turn. For example, if you find your self turning a lot of, say, 5/16" rod, using a 5/16" collet would work well. They hold real well, and take no time at all to set up the work in the collet. You could use collets for anything up the the max size available for the type of collet you use. A complete set of collets costs $$. Collets are very accurate.

    You may find it less expensive to get your self a chuck, either a 3 jaw or a 4 jaw. A 3 jaw is typically a self centering scroll type chuck, and most are accurate to about .003, give or take a couple .001's. . A 4 jaw chuck usually requires one to adjust each jaw separately, but you can always make your stock concentric to .000 is you work at it a bit. They can also be used to hold something that isn't round, or can be used to hold a round object off-center. Either type of chuck will allow you to work on stuff that is much bigger than a collet would allow, up the the max swing of your lathe. Either type of chuck is much more versatile than a collet.

    In a milling machine, collets are the universally accepted way to hold endmills. The only other way that I know of to hold an endmill satisfactorily is to use an endmill holder. They have their pro's and con's, but some folks like them a lot.

    Hope this helps a bit

    Leave a comment:


  • smiller6912
    replied
    Here is a place to start: http://techtv.mit.edu/genres/24-how-...machine-shop-1

    If possible, I would suggest a class at your local community collage or trade school. That is where I started.

    I have, and like very much, the video series available from AGI: http://www.americangunsmith.com/allitems.php?page=9
    Very informative step by step instructions.

    They are VERY expensive to buy but I think that they are worth it. They are also available for rental at: http://smartflix.com/store/category/61/Professional

    Leave a comment:


  • reggeee
    replied
    It's Here!!! And a question

    Finally got the new motor from Smithy last night. I was standing by all day with a wrench in my hand, but of course UPS whose delivery hours are 8am-7pm showed up at 7:05. The new motor went on without a hitch and it started up flawlessly. Here's a question. In the manual it says to turn the speed controller down to zero then turn it off. Then to restart it make sure the controller is at zero, start it up and then turn the speed controller up to your RPM. Is that the "law", or is it a precautionary measure by Smithy to protect our dumb asses from starting it up at full throttle and have something fly at us? Does turning the "volume" down to zero in between stops and starts protect me or the machine?
    Well...... I guess it's time to start over and learn how to use this thing again which leads me to another question. Is there a proper or smart sequence to learn machining? I.E..... don't run before you can walk kinda progress i should be trying to follow? All Advice is welcome. The plus side of all the trouble i've had is I've learned how my machine works inside and out. And i've also had a lot of time to search ebay for my next lathe.

    Leave a comment:


  • reggeee
    replied
    Thanks again rmack. So collets are basically meant for milling? I got the shipping notice from smithy. UPS ground. it'll get here in 5 days. I guess i didn't squeak quite loud enough to get 2 day service.

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  • rmack898
    replied
    Drill chucks are just that, a chuck designed to hold a drill, they do not have the grip or can they support the side loads associated with milling. A collet is designed to hold a specific size and has a much greater contact area than the 3 narrow grip points in a drill chuck. A basic collet set and about 3 different size end mill holders should do most everything you need to keep you busy for a while.

    Leave a comment:

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