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Lathe compound crossfaded screw repair

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  • Lathe compound crossfaded screw repair

    Hi all,
    without a lot of lead in, does anyone have any suggestions for repair of a broken off (near the handle, not in the threaded section) crossfeed screw for the compound on a Marshall Jewelers lathe? Finding replacements will be all but impossible, and the lathe isn't a screw cutting lathe so making one in house is out of the question. I have both parts. Could brazing or silver soldering work? Seems like straightness might be an issue.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by hal9000; 11-14-2019, 06:46 PM.

  • #2
    Face off broken ends - graver should be adequate. Drill suitable size axially in both halves for alignment pin. Silver solder. If there is space on both parts a tube outside rather than a pin inside is an alternative which might work better if you don't have a collet big enough to hold the shaft for drilling.
    If it doesn't end up straight silver solder can be remelted but you are relying on that pin to set it up straight.

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    • #3
      Thanks. That's about what I was envisioning minus the drilling and pinning idea. I don't have a large enough collet, but I can chuck it if I use this as an excuse to fab up a little steady rest

      Anyway now that I have a little more time, a bit of background. I sold off my old SB heavy 10 last year when I downsized and moved in with my fiance. I've had my little watchmakers lathe for years but hadn't set it up or bought tooling. I should have done it a long time ago. Aside from being cute, I've realized that 100mm swing is more than enough for 98% of my projects. Compounds (and any accessories really) are rare and pricey, but I got a deal on this one due to the broken crossfeed. I'm not a watchmaker but I am a jeweller and I have a bunch of design ideas that I'll be able to use this little beauty for!

      I really need to find some resources specific to WW lathes and their operation. If anyone can point me in a good direction that would be great too.

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