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  • DeLanglade
    replied
    "On one old HZ machine we made an "arbor spacer" that would slip over the the big end of the arbor and press against the spindle. Now stack up your regular arbor spacers till you can use the arbor nut to apply pressure to the stack of spacers and 'pull' the arbor out. For us it worked perfectly, no beating on things and no pressure on the spindle bearings."

    OK, this is pretty clever. I'll give it a try this weekend when I'm hiding from the heat in the basement.

    "AS for runout of the cutter, get used to it it is the norm, not the exception. Be aware that you must have good arbor spacers that are clean and in good shape. If there is debris and or dirt between the arbor spacers then tightening the arbor nut can induce some bend in the setup causing runout."

    Well, if that's the case this machine runs like a dream. Thanks.

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  • larry_g
    replied
    On one old HZ machine we made an "arbor spacer" that would slip over the the big end of the arbor and press against the spindle. Now stack up your regular arbor spacers till you can use the arbor nut to apply pressure to the stack of spacers and 'pull' the arbor out. For us it worked perfectly, no beating on things and no pressure on the spindle bearings. AS for runout of the cutter, get used to it it is the norm, not the exception. Be aware that you must have good arbor spacers that are clean and in good shape. If there is debris and or dirt between the arbor spacers then tightening the arbor nut can induce some bend in the setup causing runout.

    lg
    no neat sig line

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  • redgrouse
    replied
    Ed, welcome this is a great forum - just ask and will almost certainly receive! Regarding your milling machine have a look on here http://www.lathes.co.uk/burke/
    I understand what you say about a bigger hammer but a gentle tap with a heavy hammer will have more effect than a hefty whack with lightweight particularly when trying to break a taper or for instance striking a number or letter punch
    regards John

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  • DeLanglade
    replied
    Thanks for the tip. I forgot about threading oil.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Hi Ed, welcome to the group! I don't have direct experience with Burke, but I've seen them before and they seem solid. For coolant I've actually been using Oatey dark sulfurized cutting oil from the plumbing dept with good results (I tend to work slow)

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  • DeLanglade
    started a topic New to Forum, with a new machine

    New to Forum, with a new machine

    Hello -
    I'm Ed, and I just joined this group. I have slowly and steadily been putting together a small machine shop in my basement, and have just acquired a horizontal mill. According to the name tag, it's a U.S. Burke machine, but I have not found any real documentation anywhere online about it. It seems like a pretty solid machine, dead simple. 1hp 3ph motor, which I'm driving through a $100 Amazon VFD. It was a couple days of work to manhandle the pieces into the basement and reassemble it, but its up and running now.

    This is my first milling machine, and I have two questions right off the bat. First, is there a proceedure for truing up cutters on the arbor to reduce runout? Right now, the cutter installed seems to have some degree of runout - i'm guessing .004 or so - and loads and unloads during its revolutions.
    Second, how do you unstick an arbor? I have loosened the drawbar and given it a few taps with a soft mallet, but it must be quite content where it is. Given the amount of deformation on the drawbar end, somebody must have been more pursuasive than me at one point, but I've spent many years learning myself out of the "get the bigger hammer" mentality. Is there a trick to do this without buggering up anything?
    Oh, also, it came with a lube tank and pump. Any hints for a decent home-brew to feed this thing? I run a lot of slow things, and have found coconut oil to work nice on the shaper (it clings to the workpiece, and doesn't go rancid like lard or tallow. Smells good when it's cutting, too). But it will be too solid for this purpose.
    Thanks for any insight.
    Ed
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