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Newbie - Atlas QC54 - Ran Off Cross Slide and other Questions.

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  • Newbie - Atlas QC54 - Ran Off Cross Slide and other Questions.

    A little about me. I live in Central Texas, an hour above Austin. Any one in the area, please let me know. My user name is "Oliver 2-44" as I have a 1965 Oliver 2-44 loader backhoe at the farm that I keep running/using. I had several machine shop classes 40 yeas ago, and have been around shops and working with machinist all my working years in the Hydro Power and Dam Maintenance area. It's ironic, but because I knew the Hydro Equipment I've had machinist repair tiny governor parts, to 12 ft water wheel, babbit bearings, etc. But, I've on had my hands on a machine a few times over those years. Usually just to clean up a bolt or emery polish a shaft. so I really am a newbie at setting up and running the lathe.

    Now that I'm recently retired, I recently purchases a 10x36 Atlas QC54, serial# 090699 to use for my Antique Garden Tractor Hobby, Farm Projects and Everything else. I need to build a new stand for it, as its came mounted on a piece of office furniture. I know it's not a heavy duty lathe, but it will get me started. Before I brought the lathe in the shop I took a spray gun and a gallon of thinner and cleaned everything thoroughly. Then I used the Atlas lube chart to re- lube everything. Over time I probable need to learn to adjust the carriage gibbs, center the tailstock and any other adjustments.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	57134882945__C565E317-B4C0-480B-ADA7-6B20ACB83A6E.JPG Views:	7 Size:	241.8 KB ID:	1920451
    Recently I was trying to setup a small engine PTO Pulley in the lathe to machine the clutch surface on the back side of it. While doing this I backed the cross side off the screw. I've read it should re-engage by pulling the cross slide towards the front and cranking the handle. But I'm having no luck doing this. I don't know the specifics about the split nut arrangement, but It almost seems like the split nut is closed and not letting it re-engage. I've tried it with the nut open and closed with no success.
    I'd appreciate any help with how to fix this. also any suggestions of a stop or something I can use to gauge so I don't do this again.

    Also does anyone have a source for an On/Off switch that will fit in the opening on the lathe. It's currently wired to a residential light switch mounted on the side of the cabinet. If that or a similar switch is not available, I would also be interested in any recommendations for a good machine switch. Can I use a Forward/Reverse drum switch on this original motor?

    Any pictures of lathe stands welded metal or wooden would also be appreciated.

    I'll have more questions as I learn more and I also need to start buying & making some tooling for my lathe.

    I have a general manual, but a parts manual with exploded view of parts would also be healpful


    Thanks.
    Last edited by Oliver2-44; 01-06-2021, 03:53 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Oliver2-44 View Post
    Recently I was trying to setup a small engine PTO Pulley in the lathe to machine the clutch surface on the back side of it. While doing this I backed the cross side off the screw. I've read it should re-engage by pulling the cross slide towards the front and cranking the handle. But I'm having no luck doing this. I don't know the specifics about the split nut arrangement, but It almost seems like the split nut is closed and not letting it re-engage. I've tried it with the nut open and closed with no success.
    I'd appreciate any help with how to fix this. also any suggestions of a stop or something I can use to gauge so I don't do this again.
    I think you may be a bit confused. I’ll try to help.

    The only “split nut” that I am aware of on this lathe is the (pair of) “half nuts” that are used to feed the carriage. They have nothing to do with the cross slide, and operating the lever that opens and closes them will have no effect on the cross slide.

    If you have the power cross feed option on your lathe (I couldn’t tell from the photo), then your lead screw can indeed operate your cross slide. But not through the half nuts - they have nothing to do with it. The cross feed is instead actuated through a miter gear that slides on the lead screw and is driven by a key. If you can turn your cross feed handle, though, you either do not have the power cross feed option or it is disengaged.

    The nut that your cross feed screw turns in is a solid nut. If you can turn the cross feed handle, and you can move the cross slide by hand, you should have no trouble re-engaging the nut. I’m guessing that you are turning the handle the wrong way. To feed the cross slide away from you, you turn the handle clockwise. To feed the cross slide toward you - and to re-engage the nut - you turn the handle counter-clockwise. It’s a left hand thread.

    Hope this helps.

    Comment


    • #3
      JohnMartin Thank You for your reply. If you wouldn't mind walking me a little further through this problem I would appreciate it. Also thanks for correcting me that this has a one piece -not split- cross feed nut. I really need to get a parts manual so I understand this lathe better. My lathe does have the power cross feed option

      I went out to the shop this morning and tried to reengage the carriage by turning the handle counter-clock-wise and gently, then firmly pulling or pushing the carriage into it, with no success. I can see the cross feed screw turning, and the handle turns easy, but I do not feel any resistance as I try to move the carriage to engage the nut. The carriage doesn't move but a few thousands. It almost feels like I have a bolt locking the carriage in position. But I'm not aware of such a bolt that I might have engaged. I've been trying to call Clausing Tech Support, but just stay on hold .

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Oliver2-44 View Post
        JohnMartin Thank You for your reply. If you wouldn't mind walking me a little further through this problem I would appreciate it. Also thanks for correcting me that this has a one piece -not split- cross feed nut. I really need to get a parts manual so I understand this lathe better. My lathe does have the power cross feed option

        I went out to the shop this morning and tried to reengage the carriage by turning the handle counter-clock-wise and gently, then firmly pulling or pushing the carriage into it, with no success. I can see the cross feed screw turning, and the handle turns easy, but I do not feel any resistance as I try to move the carriage to engage the nut. The carriage doesn't move but a few thousands. It almost feels like I have a bolt locking the carriage in position. But I'm not aware of such a bolt that I might have engaged. I've been trying to call Clausing Tech Support, but just stay on hold .
        OK, first thing is to make sure that we agree on terminology. Then we can figure out what is wrong. You may have it correct, but from what I am hearing I think there may be some confusion.

        Carriage: this is the large casting that rides on the lathe bed (or ways) and travels from left to right. The vertical front piece of the carriage is the apron. The ways of the Atlas are flat on the top and square on the sides and underneath. The carriage is moved either by engaging the half nuts, which clamp down on the spinning leadscrew, or by turning the large hand wheel at the lower left of the apron, which operates a gear engaging the rack mounted underneath the front way. The carriage may be locked in position by the square-headed clamp screw on the top right. Engaging the half nuts, by operating the lever at the right of the apron, will also lock the carriage if the leadscrew is not turning. The fit of the carriage to the ways is adjusted by the gib screws which bear on the flat metal gibs which in turn bear on the ways. You would normally not touch these after they have been properly adjusted.

        Cross slide: this is the casting that sits on top of the carriage, and travels from front to back. It rides on a dovetail machined onto the top of the carriage. There is a gib inserted on the right side of the cross slide which is adjusted for fit by the several screws along the slide. Once these are adjusted they should be left alone, although the center screw may be used to lock the cross slide. There is no other lock for the cross slide. The cross slide is moved by a feed screw running through the top of the dovetail. It may be turned by hand using the handle, or under power if the power cross feed is engaged and the leadscrew is turning. The feed screw runs in a brass nut underneath the cross slide, which is attached to the cross slide by a single screw on the top of the cross slide. You will find two screws on the top of the cross slide - the rear one attaches the rear cover, the one just in front of it holds the brass nut.

        Compound slide, or top slide: this sits on top of a swivel casting on top of the cross slide. It runs on dovetail ways with a gib and adjusting screws, just like the cross slide. On the Atlas, the feed screw that moves it is operated only by the hand crank. There is no lock, although as with the cross slide the center gib screw may be used to lock it.

        It still sounds to me that it is your cross slide that has come off its feed screw, by advancing it too far away from you. It should be no problem to re-engage it with its feed screw. As the feed screw turns freely, the power cross feed is not engaged - and that is as it should be. The feed screw has a left hand thread. Turn it counter-clockwise, and pull the cross slide toward you. It should re-engage. If it doesn’t, try loosening slightly the screw holding the brass nut - it is possible that it has swiveled out of line with the feed screw. Tighten it back up when it is properly engaged. If that still doesn’t work, it may be that the threads on the front of the nut have been deformed. Remove the rear cover and loosen the screw holding the brass nut and see if you can turn the nut 180 degrees. I’m not sure that you can on this lathe, but if you can you should be able to get the feed screw started.

        Get a manual as soon as you can. In the meantime, check out the lathes.co.uk website.

        Hope this helps.

        Comment


        • #5
          Slacken off the slide adjuster screws on the side of the cross slide (the one you call the carriage) until the slide moves easily. Then pull it towards you while turning the handle. It should re-engage easily. I've run slides off their screws loads of times, and it isn't usually difficult to re=engage them. When you've done, re-adjust the screws.
          'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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          • #6
            The original switch is just a single pole metal toggle. The plate it mounts to is on E Bay for 20 plus dollars so I would just make that. I also mounted a drum switch which gives me reverse on my non stock motor. I only use reverse with no load as I have no locking mechanism for the threaded chucks. Having one spin off is more excitement than I want. Personally I would try and get more familiar with your lathe before putting it to work. The Atlas Lathes can do pretty good work but can be easily broken by inexperienced operators. I run my compound at 29 1/2 degrees and I see many people run it at 90 degrees. The quick change tool post is nice and I use mostly HSS bits. The Atlas is not rigid enough for carbide tooling in general.

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