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Frozen screw on tool bit

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  • Frozen screw on tool bit

    I have a tool bit for my lathe, that has a triangular carbide insert. One side of the insert is chipped, and I want to rotate the insert. There is a tiny screw holding the bit to the tool itself. It looks like a .050 allen head. I cannot get this screw out. I am bending the wrench like a licorice stick, but it won't move. I soaked the bit in liquid wrench, and put some heat on it from a propane torch. It just won't come loose. I have oxy acetelyne, but I fear that will be too much heat. What can I do to get this screw loose without destroying the tool?

  • #2
    Check the other side, where the screw threads come out. Usually there is another allen head on the other end of the screw. 2 allen keys at the same time.
    I have turned tools upside down and broken the insert, but that is a last resort.

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    • #3
      I just checked. There is no screw head on the reverse side. What now?

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      • #4
        More heat. Get it HOT! Heat it from the bottom and sides. Try and heat the tool part, not the screw.

        If the screw doesn't come out, the tool is junk. If the screw breaks, its still junk. You can only make it better at this point.

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        • #5
          Ive had good luck with shocking it with a small hammer, yes the insert is usually broken but the screw usually come out.
          I apply torque to the screw then smack the insert.
          Beaver County Alberta Canada

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          • #6
            I used acetelyne, and the screw still won't come out. It looks like I will have to break the insert.

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            • #7
              Well, I got it out. I took a Dremel tool, with a cone point, and ground down on the stripped screw head. I finally got it down enough, that I could use a small chisel to get under the damaged side of the insert. It took a lot of tapping to slip the insert over the remaining screw head. There was nothing remaining of the screw to grip, so I placed the tool in my drill press vice, and tried to drill it out from the bottom. It looked like a #3 screw thread. To my amazement, the drill bit unscrewed the remains for me. It fell right out. What a break. Even a bigger break was, there was an extra screw included in the tool set. Back together again, using a fresh side of the insert. Almost as good as new!

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              • #8
                Too late now, but if you can see the hole on the back side, then getting the tool fairly hot, then putting oil down the hole on the back, will often pull oil in and loosen it up. Might take a couple tries. You can put the oil in first, you won't need to heat it hot enough to cook the oil.

                The screw does not need to be in super-tight. better not to do that. It only needs to hold the insert snug. The "pocket" should hold the insert from turning. Too tight can crack the insert, and there goes a few bucks.
                2730

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Everything not impossible is compulsory

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                • #9
                  I know I'm late to the thread too but aren't insert tooling screws usually torx headed?
                  Please don't take it the wrong way, but I know torx screws look like they would take a hex key sometimes.
                  Good work in getting that dang screw out.
                  In my day-job we have to loosen the set-screws on lock cylinders when we need to change them. Very often these little 8-32 screws that take a 5/64" hex key are on exterior doors and so are corroded to hell and back. I find that if the hex on the screw gets rounded over at all that I'm in for a long job/long day.

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                  • #10
                    Torks bits are often ground with a taper. You can grind them back to the taper, then hammer them into an allen head screw

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