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Seeking a home shop machinist to advise on a DIY flatware project

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  • Seeking a home shop machinist to advise on a DIY flatware project

    I’m a flatware designer looking for someone with knowledge on benchtop drill presses and counterboring stainless steel. I am relatively new to this scene and would like to hire someone to advise on my process and best practices. Looking to counterbore steel handles using a benchtop drill press and combine to the fork/knife/spoon using compression rivets. I work out of a small artist studio, so space is somewhat of an issue.

  • #2
    Originally posted by kfair View Post
    I’m a flatware designer looking for someone with knowledge on benchtop drill presses and counterboring stainless steel. I am relatively new to this scene and would like to hire someone to advise on my process and best practices. Looking to counterbore steel handles using a benchtop drill press and combine to the fork/knife/spoon using compression rivets. I work out of a small artist studio, so space is somewhat of an issue.
    Welcome to the forum.

    Most likely, you're in for a bad time. Counterboring is one of the most rigidity requiring operations for a drill press. Even on an MT3 industrial press I've had to go down to speeds lower than possible from the factory. Stainless just ups the ante. For anything over 1/8-3/16" I think you will struggle with a benchtop drill press.
    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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    • #3
      Yikes, it's never easy is it? I need a pretty shallow counterbore (think it's called a spot face?) just enough so the compression rivet is flush with the surface. Rivet is 2mm thick.

      Is there something else you would recommend for a job like this?

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      • #4
        I would disagree that counterboring is beyond the capability of a small drill press. When the counterbore pilot is sized correctly to the hole in the part, it generally goes quite well. Speed must be slow enough to not burn the cutter, and feed must be aggressive enough to not workharden the part, but it’s really not that difficult.

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        • #5
          Hi John — Attaching a photo of my project for context. I located a counterbore bit that fits and was recommended an rpm of 200 by the manufacturer. If I locate a drill press that can match that speed do you think it will be possible to spot face the stainless steel handles successfully?

          Click image for larger version

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          • #6
            Any drill press that normally runs 200 rpm should be fine. Most bench tops are usually around 700.
            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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